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what's the steepest One can ski ? - Page 3

post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
If by "conventional" you mean, lazy, and somewhat novice, then yes I agree with you.

Watch almost any decent ski movie out there (no warren miller) and you will see people skiing, (conventionaly or otherwise, that are making turns and staying in control) on sustained pitches of 60+ degrees.

No, that's not what I meant, I think it's a stupid comment, and I think the concept of "skiing" on 60+ degrees of slope is a fantasy.
post #62 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by jviss View Post
No, that's not what I meant, I think it's a stupid comment, and I think the concept of "skiing" on 60+ degrees of slope is a fantasy.
How is it a fantasy? People do it. I don't see how you could think its fantasy. Trust me on this, people ski on 60+ degree slopes.

Maybe you put "skiing" in quotes because you think at that steepness "its not really skiing anymore" or something along those lines, but that just seems like the kind of mindset someone would have about something they refuse to comprehend.
post #63 of 76
Come on Maggot, don't you know it's impossible to ski more that 60 degrees or 60 mph?:
post #64 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
How is it a fantasy? People do it. I don't see how you could think its fantasy. Trust me on this, people ski on 60+ degree slopes.

Maybe you put "skiing" in quotes because you think at that steepness "its not really skiing anymore" or something along those lines, but that just seems like the kind of mindset someone would have about something they refuse to comprehend.
Maggot, your reply makes sense, and I agree, right up to tthe point that you call my ability or willingness to comprehend something into question; doesn't help your argument. WHy is that necessary?

Clearly something breaks loose on the way to 90 degrees. I'm sure it's not a simple answer like "63 degrees," but rather, a range of angles, probably small, through which one makes the transition from skiing to something else like falling, or "hopping down the slope with boards attached to the feet" - but maybe others would put that technique into the definition of skiing, I don't know. Traversing on the bases, and then carving or skidding a turn through the fall line into another travers, adn linking them together as one progresses down the hill - I think it might become nearly impossible at 60 or more degrees slope. I can't find a reference online using google to someone skiing on that kind of slope, but I'd be interested to see one if anyon can find something.
post #65 of 76

Well, maybe 60+ IS skiable...

Just found this:

http://www.skistats.com/slopes_detail.asp?lowest=30

Listed are two slopes at 60 or more degrees - has anyone ever skied these? I'd love to see that.

jv
post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by jviss View Post
Maggot, your reply makes sense, and I agree, right up to tthe point that you call my ability or willingness to comprehend something into question; doesn't help your argument. WHy is that necessary?
You were refusing to believe something is possible simply because you hadn't done it. I was just stating a fact, not insulting you like when you called me stupid. Since you are so concerned with being mature and all that, maybe you should start with your own comments.

And I'm glad you realized that well gosh darn, maybe it is just possible.
post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
You were refusing to believe something is possible simply because you hadn't done it. I was just stating a fact, not insulting you like when you called me stupid. Since you are so concerned with being mature and all that, maybe you should start with your own comments.

And I'm glad you realized that well gosh darn, maybe it is just possible.
Hey, I said the comment was stupid, not you; and I was referring to the comment: "If by "conventional" you mean, lazy, and somewhat novice, then yes I agree with you." Is someone skiing on a 45 degree slope lazy or novice? I'm sorry if I offended you.

I was trying to help define the question a bit, since there is clearly a departure from "skiing" before you reach 90 degrees, no? This is just the classic engineer's approach: first, define skiing, then examine the boundary conditions, and then go for some further understanding in the middle.

I might be the 60 is the limit for sustained slopes, since there are only two stated as 60 or more on that list. One of the top on the list, Tuckerman's Chute Variation (there are actually two, a North and a South, but the chart doesn't distinguish) is reported on the chart as 60 degrees, but in other guidebooks is reported as much less. Usually, these kind of slopes have entries at the cornice that are very, very steep, but the average slope of the "trail" is in the 45 degree neighborhood, and considered "very steep."
post #68 of 76
That skistats list not only contains at least some bogus data but is an invention of small minds. Apparently anyone can "add" a slope to the list. Check the add function. Doesn't even indicate how the person making the input is doing so. A person could add some beginner rope tow named Bunny Lane and rate the steepness as 70 degrees. Assigning a single slope angle pitch to any slope is hardly useful. Just about every steep slope varies in pitch so the only reasonable ways to quantify a run's slope at a minimum is to indicate minimum/maximum/average pitch or better create a graph. ---dave
post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave_SSS View Post
That skistats list not only contains at least some bogus data but is an invention of small minds. Apparently anyone can "add" a slope to the list. Check the add function. Doesn't even indicate how the person making the input is doing so. A person could add some beginner rope tow named Bunny Lane and rate the steepness as 70 degrees. Assigning a single slope angle pitch to any slope is hardly useful. Just about every steep slope varies in pitch so the only reasonable ways to quantify a run's slope at a minimum is to indicate minimum/maximum/average pitch or better create a graph. ---dave
I was going to pipe in with that as well.

I noticed their list says that Corbet's here in JH is 50 degrees. Other than the first step (which is pretty close to vertical), it actually isn't much over 40 degrees.
post #70 of 76
I think there is still a valid question buried in this thread. Some people can ski 60 degrees slopes; noone can ski an 89 degree slope (jump it yes, ski it, no). So where is the limit?
post #71 of 76
skistats especially exaggerates Mammoth's slopes.
post #72 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
I think there is still a valid question buried in this thread. Some people can ski 60 degrees slopes; noone can ski an 89 degree slope (jump it yes, ski it, no). So where is the limit?
You can figure it out. All you need is the coefficient of friction, length of skis, and position of skier's centre of mass. Calculate the maximum slope for zero torque about any point, say for simplicity front point of contact of skis. Shorter steeper slopes can be skied for a short time before tipping over.
post #73 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Well, it made a good story. Here is the picture with
the correct 38 degrees drawn on.

The blue lines are at 38 degrees.
This is one of those deceptive photos -- the shoulder defining the edge is not really part of the run. It's not really a very good photo for measuring slope, but the coincidence of an exact match was (I thought) too good to pass up.


Wow. You're a nerd with wayyy too much free time.
post #74 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by jviss View Post
Just found this:

http://www.skistats.com/slopes_detail.asp?lowest=30

Listed are two slopes at 60 or more degrees - has anyone ever skied these? I'd love to see that.

jv
I'm by no means a regular at Mont Sainte Anne, but I don't recall a 55 degree T-Bar line there. :
post #75 of 76
The skistats site, as others have pointed out, seems a little suspect. Perhaps the Mammoth stats have some truth at the cornice entrances, but the slopes mellow out quite a bit after a few turns.

The most intimidating in-bounds steeps I have skied are at Big Sky/Moonlight. It's not just the slope angle, but the amount of vert at that angle and the consequences of falling.
post #76 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by donteatyellowsnow View Post
Wow. You're a nerd with wayyy too much free time.
why? Cause I can do trig? or because I corrected my mistake?
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