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ive been wondering this for a while . . .

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
basically ive always been putting pressure on my outside foot to carry out and initiate the turns. i dont claim to be very experience, only skiied for 3 weeks. is this right? or should, as i progress be putting a fair amount of pressure on my inside foot too? i think when im turning most of my weight is on the ouside foot and the other just kind of trails. sorry not the best explanation but hopefully someone can understand and tell me the rights and wrongs
post #2 of 13
Welcome to EpicSki--and to skiing--Robbbbbb!

If you search the archives here, you'll find that this topic has been discussed a LOT!

My advice, in brief, is not to worry about which foot you "should" be standing on, and learn to balance on either or both. In real skiing, you'll find plenty of times when you'll need that skill!

There was a time when the more pressure we could get on a ski the better (it made the ski bend more and perform kind of like our skis today perform with much less work), so it made sense to focus on skiing entirely on one ski all the time, with a distinct weight transfer from turn to turn.

There are still a number of reasons why we usually ski with most of our weight on the outside ski of the turn, but it is less critical these days. For the most part, I don't even worry about which foot bears the most weight. Normally, if I let them, the forces of the turn will pull me toward my outside ski, just as they pull you toward the outside when you turn in a car. It would take work to fight against that, so go ahead and let your weight shift to the outside ski. Practice balancing on it so that you are confident and capable when the forces pull you there.

Balancing on the outside ski still has several advantages. It takes work to avoid it, for one thing. The outside leg is biomechanically in a better position to withstand the forces of the turn than the inside leg. And it keeps the inside leg and ski available as a backup, should the outside ski slip away a little (or a lot).

But don't get in too much of a rush to move to that outside ski. If you try to transfer weight to the other ski without the aid of the forces that pull you there, it will require you to make movements that will disrupt that smooth, effortless, sensuous flow from turn to turn that is the mark of the expert skier. Especially at lower speeds, where the forces of the turn are less, it may take some time in each turn for the weight to shift to the outside ski. Be patient!

And don't panic if you do get some weight on that inside ski. It carves as well as the other ski! If you learn to tip and guide that ski accurately, it will be able to take over as much of the load as needed to help continue the turn. If the outside ski slips a little on ice, the inside ski is right there to help. If you're skiing powder, with both skis in, rather than on the snow, the pressure will be more even, without you needing to change your movements.

Most importantly, like I said, don't get too caught up in trying to shift your weight to the uphill ski to start a new turn, especially at low speeds, as that movement will surely produce an unwanted glitch in your smooth transitions from turn to turn.

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbbbb View Post
basically ive always been putting pressure on my outside foot to carry out and initiate the turns. i dont claim to be very experience, only skiied for 3 weeks. is this right? or should, as i progress be putting a fair amount of pressure on my inside foot too? i think when im turning most of my weight is on the ouside foot and the other just kind of trails. sorry not the best explanation but hopefully someone can understand and tell me the rights and wrongs
No, not a bad explanation at all and yes, you should have most of your weight on your outside ski. How much, as much as you feel comfortable with. Later on when you are able to bring your skis closer together you can start to distribute your weight more evenly on both skis but the outside ski should allways be carrying most of the load.

PM me if you want a video lesson on this topic.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
but the outside ski should allways be carrying most of the load.
Many "modern" technique skiers would disagree quite strongly with this statement. And once you get in the habit of doing things with a heavy emphasis on the outside ski it'll take a ton of time and effort to untrain yourself...

I'm not quibbling about a small differential in pressure - but the notion of heavily favoring the outside ski under all, or even most, conditions is dated. Despite that fact that many still seem to teach it.

Of course, I have no pins of any color and I am no doubt contaminating the technique forum...
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Many "modern" technique skiers would disagree quite strongly with this statement. And once you get in the habit of doing things with a heavy emphasis on the outside ski it'll take a ton of time and effort to untrain yourself...

I'm not quibbling about a small differential in pressure - but the notion of heavily favoring the outside ski under all, or even most, conditions is dated. Despite that fact that many still seem to teach it.

Of course, I have no pins of any color and I am no doubt contaminating the technique forum...
This is especially true regarding turn initiation. Jumping immediately onto the new outside ski reduces the efficient use of modern equipment.

As Bob noted, let the turn itself determine when and how much weight goes to the outside foot.
post #6 of 13
robbbbb,

You have nice answers above. I think of balancing between my skis and let my weight continusally change between the two as needed.

RW
post #7 of 13
Agree strongly on the last post. Bob B summed things up quite well. I also think of having half on each foot in a straight run, and as I begin a turn, physics takes over and I'm not equal anymore. I do have a substantial amount of weight on my inside ski, but I won't quote a percentage because it changes so often and depends on many, many factors for any given situation.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Many "modern" technique skiers would disagree quite strongly with this statement. And once you get in the habit of doing things with a heavy emphasis on the outside ski it'll take a ton of time and effort to untrain yourself...

I'm not quibbling about a small differential in pressure - but the notion of heavily favoring the outside ski under all, or even most, conditions is dated. Despite that fact that many still seem to teach it.

Of course, I have no pins of any color and I am no doubt contaminating the technique forum...
No, you are not contaminating the technique forum and yes, a more two footed stance is more "modern" but when we are talking about lower level skiing it is important to get familiar with the the forces and how to manipulate them in order to turn and to stay in balance. I allways try to teach students to feel the force (on the outside ski) before we move on to more complicated issues of skiing.
post #9 of 13
This is where I think we differ in point of view. I do not think "two footed" is more complicated for a beginner. And when you get used to relying on the outside foot for everything, you also get used to pretty much dragging your inside foot along for the ride - the classic "I know I was carving, but instead of leaving RR tracks, I left a cut from the outside ski and an inside ski smush at the apex of the turn" phenomenon. And no matter how hard someone tries, and tries, and tries it does not get better until they completely restructure their turns - everything from entry to balance to tip lead issues. Why make someone go through this when the two footed thing is really no harder a way to learn to ski in the first place? And results in someone being comfortable shifting variable amounts of weight/force to either ski - and hence using all 4 edges. And as an added benefit results in a much more natural transition to skiing variable snow and off piste - including powder.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
No, you are not contaminating the technique forum and yes, a more two footed stance is more "modern" but when we are talking about lower level skiing it is important to get familiar with the the forces and how to manipulate them in order to turn and to stay in balance. I allways try to teach students to feel the force (on the outside ski) before we move on to more complicated issues of skiing.
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
i think im kinda doing what spindrift describes. right i think im putting way to much weight on my outside foot than i should be but only sking one week a year kind of makes things diificult. ill budget for some lessons on my next trip. thanks for all your advice. tdk6 ill give you a pm in a few days about that video, i feel it might be just what i need!
i can ski reds and blacks so not that much of a novice, just think im not sking them properly or with any proper technique!
post #12 of 13
When I first started teaching skiing in 1970, we did things like TDK6 describes, which basically is teaching the turn backwards. The focus then was on developing familiarity with the ends of turns and then the middle of turns and then the starts of turns. The problem is that most folks never learn a proper start of a turn, so they're always working their skis to catch up with the forces the turn generates rather than managing those forces from the turn entry onward.

The more "modern" approach is to teach beginners from the beginning to use both skis to start a turn and--very soon in the learning process--to use corresponding edges.
post #13 of 13
The best explanation I ever got on pressure skills is it's not "doing" pressure it's "dealing with pressure".

Tip and turn and then allow your pressure to adjust to keep you in balance. It's likely that, even with modern technique and equipment, more pressure will naturally build on your outside ski; just let it and balance with it. You don't need anything active to create it.

Or, to be even more terse "what Bob said".
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › ive been wondering this for a while . . .