New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shin Bang :(

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I just bought some Nordica Speedmachine 14s that are a size smaller than my current boots (that were sized incorrectly and were too big). My old boots were giving me shin bang b/c of being too big.
The new boots feel as though they fit great - I am confident they are the right size now.
I skied on them for the first time this weekend, and found on day two, my shins were killing me again
I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. All the suggestions my bootfitter has given me haven't worked. Are there adjustments you'd recommend I do to my boots to help this situation? It's making skiing very painful
Thanks
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefJef View Post
I just bought some Nordica Speedmachine 14s that are a size smaller than my current boots (that were sized incorrectly and were too big). My old boots were giving me shin bang b/c of being too big.
The new boots feel as though they fit great - I am confident they are the right size now.
I skied on them for the first time this weekend, and found on day two, my shins were killing me again
I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. All the suggestions my bootfitter has given me haven't worked. Are there adjustments you'd recommend I do to my boots to help this situation? It's making skiing very painful
Thanks
Mkae sure that there is nothing in your boot other than a thin sock. No leggings going down into the boot. Make sure that the tongue of the boot is in teh correct spot. Look and see if you have a huge gap in the cuff when you flex forward if so tighten the power strap or bring the power strap under the buckles so it's against the tongue and tioghten it there.
post #3 of 21
Take a look at the Insta Print Tongues that are about $20. They velcro to the tongue of your liner and will provide better contact between your shin and tongue. Maybe a Booster Strap will help too.
post #4 of 21
Might be a nugget in here somewhere:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ight=shin+bang
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post
Maybe a Booster Strap will help too.
There is one (as licensed by Nordica) already built into the boot. He just has to run the strap inside the shell.
post #6 of 21
One thing you can do is tape over the hot spot with ordinary cloth adhesive bandage tape. Most shin bang and hots spots are caused by friction, not just pressure, and the tape often takes care of it. Nobody ever believes it, but it's always workrd for me, even when I had Lange Comps.
The other thing you can try is a cream that's made for people with prosthetic legs. (If you think you have problems, think about a guy walking around on a wooden leg.) I don't recall what they call it, but you can get it at pharmacies, or stores that sell medical supplies.

BK
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
wow, thanks for all the suggestions. I love this site!
post #8 of 21
Sitting back causes shin bang much worse than being overly aggressive. Try a set of heel lifts.
post #9 of 21
i have the same boots and had the same problem last week. it was my first considerable time in them. I just cranked the booster and buckels down and it went away. you might just want to try cranking it down
post #10 of 21
Make sure the tongue is snug against your calf. The Booster helps that a lot, so make sure that it's inside and snugs the liner around your leg (but not too tight!).
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh View Post
i have the same boots and had the same problem last week. it was my first considerable time in them. I just cranked the booster and buckels down and it went away. you might just want to try cranking it down

All buckles or the upper boot buckels? Did it cut off your circulation?
post #12 of 21
upper ones made the most difference

i did lose a bit of blood flow, but the runs, even at jackson, didnt last long enought to lose feeling, just loosen them on the lift. Not the best fix, but the boots are really nice.
I want to try that velcro shin pad, im curious if its going to make my back seat problem worse
post #13 of 21
I'd focus on the Booster first. If that doesn't help, then try the upper buckles tighter... but a little at a time!
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Make sure the tongue is snug against your calf.
Lessee here...I just checked, and the way my leg is put together, the calf is in back, but on my boots, the tongue is in front. I can get the tongue snug against my shin, but no matter how I try, I can't get it against my calf. Am I doing something wrong???
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
Lessee here...I just checked, and the way my leg is put together, the calf is in back, but on my boots, the tongue is in front. I can get the tongue snug against my shin, but no matter how I try, I can't get it against my calf. Am I doing something wrong???


Well done!
post #16 of 21
Keep in mind that shin bang is an injury or trauma to the tissues or tendons at the front of the ankle and shin. Too much instep room causes you to flex at the ankle to get contact to the boot and that strain is the real cause of much shin bang. Getting out of the backseat skiing, heel lifts and booster straps are all helpful.

Once you have the injury, you are vulnerable to continued trauma and pain. Part of the problem in new boots may be an incompletely healed injury from the old ones.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh View Post
upper ones made the most difference

i did lose a bit of blood flow, but the runs, even at jackson, didnt last long enought to lose feeling, just loosen them on the lift. Not the best fix, but the boots are really nice.
I want to try that velcro shin pad, im curious if its going to make my back seat problem worse.
Be careful about heel lifts, spoilers, etc. designed to force you forward. Depending on your individual body geometry, you may find that you drop your hips to compensate, and end up more in the back seat than ever.

The velcro shin pad, on the other hand, may help you stand up and get centered. In fact, you may find it allows you to apply moderate, controlled transient pressure to the front of the boot as necessary without requiring large movements and major leverage. It may relieve the back seat problem. Again, depending on your body geometry, skiing style, etc., YMMV.

I ski in Nordica Doberman Pro 130s. I ski off piste much of the time. I do not suffer from shin bang. (Well except on my left shin after I skied into a buried stump...but it's getting better! ) I do have small calves and shin bones, so the boot fitter made a shim out of dense closed cell foam that I insert in front of the tongue before buckling. The idea is to avoid overbuckling the boot and still make it so the cuff follows the motion of my lower leg accurately. Although the tongue is foamed, you can't put so much foam in the tongue that it doesn't wrap around the shin, so, in my case, other methods are required.

I buckle the top buckle quite firmly, but it does not interfere with circulation (and it shouldn't). The instep buckles are just buckled barely enough to prevent them from coming open and catching on things.

Having to buckle your boots to the point where it interferes with circulation is an indicator that the boot may not fit correctly.
post #18 of 21
dumb question: what is YMMV?
thanks
post #19 of 21
I actually had to ask a friend what it meant a while ago.

Your mileage may vary.
post #20 of 21

All of the recommendations about getting a good boot fit, and tightening the boot are necessary.

Once you have a bruise, you can keep the tongue of the boot away from the bruise by cutting a hole in a shin pad.

I saw one guy here used a foam beer cooler cut in half...which should work after you cut a hole for the bruised area.

I used simple "frost king" thin foam weather stripping which you can find at home depot.  Run the strips on both sides of your shin AWAY (on the sides) of the crest of the shin.  Do not add padding on top of the bruised area.   Ski socks only and crank those buckles!

The "eliminator" which is a giant tongue, is far too think and is only appropriate for very loose fitting boots.

post #21 of 21

svt:

 

Welcome to Epic.....won't comment about your advice but FWIW............the last post was 4 years ago and I'd guess the OP has it sorted by now.

 

SJ

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion