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Another Fine Patroller story

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Today, my husband Pictured here
had a significant collision with his buddy. His buddy is solid and easily outweighs him by 50 lbs. Said buddy didn't budge but instead sent my husband into the trees.

Patrollers were quick to respond but found a terrible patient.
Refusing to be treated. Unable to tell them what month it was. (you know the drill). He did eventually end up on a toboggan with a collar, and did not recognize me.(that could be a good thing). He ended up Demanding that they unload him from the ambulance, after I instructed them to load him up and I'd meet them at the hospital. I ended up bringing him home, after signing a few releases stating that he refused transport. He's been clear since just prior to unloading him, but his ribs really hurt.
The patient has a few cracked ribs, but a really hard head!
He broke the visor on his MOTOCROSS helmet. If he rung his bell this bad wearing a motocross helmet, how bad could this have been had he not been wearing any helmet at all?

Any way........to the patrollers who had to deal with my husband. My apologies and gratitude!
post #2 of 26
Well, how cheap was the MX helmet?

Did you bring him to the hospital, or just determine he had some broken ribs? I haven't been patrolling long, but I don't know if I'd let someone go if they were in a C collar and everything. I thought when the c collar was put on, it only got taken off at the hospital. At least that's what they taught me in OEC class. Must just be local protocol around here. I'm probably wrong, too. (barely passed my OEC test at 80%)
post #3 of 26
The patient can refuse treatment. The issue about not taking off the collar and taking a patient off a backboard, refers to a patroller deciding to removing the patient.
post #4 of 26
I know they can refuse it, but I wouldn't feel right letting them go if they had a C collar on. But, where I patrol, we put a C collar on someone like a couple times per year.
post #5 of 26
first of all Trekchick---please keep an eye on him all evening. be sure to call 911 if he seems disoriented or has any other cognitive difficulties as the evening progresses.

Be sure to replace the helmet too. Ski helmets are intended to be one use. Motocross I'm not that sure about.

Ham---you do not have the authority, nor does anyone else up the foodchain, to retain a patient against his wishes---assuming he -or she is of majority and makes an informed decision.

If he is disoriented, I'd do my best to keep him on a backboard and let the ambulance guys deal with it---because if disoriented, he is not able to make an informed consent.
post #6 of 26
The way it sounded to me, the person sounded disoriented. That's why I thought what I did. Sorry, now I feel so dumb. This is my 1st year. I'll keep my mouth shut from now on.
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
To answer the helmet questions:
The MX helmet was 40.00, on a close out sale. My husband's desire to embrace the gaper in him is a whole different thread topic.

Skier_J, Mx helmets are also a one impact rule. That is where I got my original research on helment impact. That is also why my husband bought 6 helmets like this one when he found them on close out. I think this is the last one left in the "quiver of helmets"
He was very disoriented at the scene.
He became very coherent after being loaded in the ambulance. That is when he was CLEAR he wanted to be let go!!! The patrol didn't actually release him. The ambulance did. But.....I signed releases for both of them, and witnessed my husband signing both releases also.

Did I say he is stubborn?

I've been up several times tonight(its 2:30 am now) and checking him.

Since he's a Motorcycle racer and I'm the Insurance communications officer at our local motorcycle track, I'm fairly aware of the refusal of treatment, release of liability, and all that goes with that.

BTW, did I say, he's swedish?
You can always tell a swede, you just can't tell 'em much.
post #8 of 26
I missed this thead today and wish you and Terry the best for a quick recovery and you just never know. Sounds like the helmet was a good idea, OTOH, you've said his head is hard enough to stop a brick, so you should know.

Best wishes. Let us know if we can help in anyway.
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
I missed this thead today and wish you and Terry the best for a quick recovery and you just never know. Sounds like the helmet was a good idea, OTOH, you've said his head is hard enough to stop a brick, so you should know.

Best wishes. Let us know if we can help in anyway.
Well..........The things I could use your help with are things I gave up on a long time ago:.
post #10 of 26
I like that guy. He sounds like someone I know.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Well, update. I got up several times in the night to check on his clarity and also check the snow conditions to decide on calling my employees out to plow.

Upon checking on my husband at 2 AM, he was going to go check "the guys" Never came back. When I was out doing my plow accounts, I found him in his JCB Plowing parking lots, like he didn't have a care in the world.

When he climbed out of the loader, he winced a little...........okay, he winced a lot:

Back to business as usual:
Don't know why I expected different from him.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post

BTW, did I say, he's swedish?
You can always tell a swede, you just can't tell 'em much.

Hey, I resemble that remark! Guess it could be true.

Don't apologise to the patrol. They love this sort of stuff in some demented way. I just had a friend tell me about a combative head injury he had to deal with as though it was the highpoint of the year.

And keep an eye on him, and in particular, avoid any more head bangs for a good six months. Second and third concussions are serious.
post #13 of 26
Sounds like a farmer I know.
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for your care and advice.
I have been keeping an eye on him. Except when I went skiing today for 6 hrs and left him home alone.........does that make me a bad wife/nurse?

Lars, he has a harder head than yours.:
Maybe that's why we get along so well
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Question:
What does it mean that my husband didn't recall my presence during this mishap, but he remembers the cute patrol girl on the P40's?
post #16 of 26
Hit him on the head again!
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Question:
What does it mean that my husband didn't recall my presence during this mishap, but he remembers the cute patrol girl on the P40's?

OK. one more whack on the head might be in order.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Update and some humour!
My husband is wearing a helmet that is exactly like the one in the collision(did I tell you he got several on a close out a few years back)

Saturday we were skiing and happend on the chairlift with a patroller who starts taking, dialog goes as follows

Patroller: So, Terry how are you doing?
Terry: Okay, do I know you?
Patroller: aren't you the guy from the collision on thor a few weeks back?
Terry: Yea, why? Were you one of them?
Patroller: I wasn't on the incident but we all heard about it!
Terry: So, I'm famous!
Patroller: Well, you hit pretty hard!
Terry: Yea, and to think my wife picks on me for wearing a motocoss helmet.
Patroller: Well, the word is that you were somewhat combative, but your wife straightened things out! The patrollers love your wife!
Terry: You don't have to live with her!:
Me: No words, just laughing so hard I almost fell of the chair!!!!

My husband is famous!
post #19 of 26
Glad to hear he's back on the slopes. With his sense of humor intact.
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tooslow View Post
Glad to hear he's back on the slopes. With his sense of humor intact.
Necessity is the mother of invention. Ya hit a few trees and you learn to laugh about it.
I showed him where he went into the trees, over the weekend, he said "oh, that's why I hurt so bad for a week"
He doesn't remember a thing. What could I have done to him? Dang I missed an opportunity of a lifetime!:
post #21 of 26
This is the last one left in the quiver of helmets!? Does he remember being married at all? His mother? His name?
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver View Post
This is the last one left in the quiver of helmets!? Does he remember being married at all? His mother? His name?
Yea, sorta
He remembered the lady ski patroller with the p40's:
I told his buddy that I missed the chance to "get out" when he didn't recognize me
Just kidding of course.
post #23 of 26
people remember and don't remember wierd things with head injuries, although I was at refresher this morning and the neurosurgeon who was lecturing said that if a patient doesn't recognize his wife, it's not neurologic, it's psychologic.

maybe you should hit him in the head again
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamradio View Post
The way it sounded to me, the person sounded disoriented. That's why I thought what I did. Sorry, now I feel so dumb. This is my 1st year. I'll keep my mouth shut from now on.
Please keep asking questions and don't be afriad to question the answers that you get, esp on an internet forum.
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamradio View Post
The way it sounded to me, the person sounded disoriented. That's why I thought what I did. Sorry, now I feel so dumb. This is my 1st year. I'll keep my mouth shut from now on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
Please keep asking questions and don't be afriad to question the answers that you get, esp on an internet forum.
I agree with Tetonpwdrjunkie.
Ham, you're young and have shown a great deal of enthusiasm to be a positive force in this sport. Keep up the good work.
post #26 of 26
Two years ago, I was wearing a racing helmet when I took some air going off a cat track, landed off the trail, did a cartwheel and came down on my head.

I actually felt OK, put my ski back on, and finished the run. It was the end of the day. We went to the locker room, and my buddy commented on my fall, and my response showed I was disoriented. A nurse looked at me, and then took me to the doctor's office right at the ski hill - Crested Butte. The doctor diagnosed a mild concussion. About two hours after the fall, I was no longer disoriented and had pretty much full recollection of what had happened. Oh, and the helmet was fine!

A little later I developed a problem with two teeth. Apparently, what caused the concussion was my lower jaw banging into my upper jaw upon impact of my helmet with the terrain, and not the direct impact itself - my head had felt fine.

I then learned from some extreme skiers there, that they wear a mouthguard to protect against just such an impact. So I now keep my hockey mouthguard in my ski bag to wear if I'm going to ski any gnarly terrain.

Trekchick, based on a comparison with my symptoms, I suspect that your husband may have had a more severe concussion. He should get checked out for any lingering neurological deficits.
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