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What is my DIN?????

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm 5' 10" 140 pounds. Type 2 skier. My bindings are marker m1000 boot 310mm
post #2 of 18
When you say "type 2" what do you really mean? Do you know what your actual level is (for instance, I'm a level 7-8)?

On the shop cards at most places they say type 1, 2, 3 but that's really broad...Typically type 2 refers to an intermediate skier, but once again, too general.

Since you are asking about this on a public forum I'm assuming you are attempting to set the DIN youreself, or checking on the shops settings?

Please don't take this the wrong way, but if you are going to set the DIN youreself and are attempting to get the correct DIN by just mentioning your height, weight and referring to youreself as a very general stated "type 2" skier, please take them to a shop...Not worth the injury if you get it wrong.

Just as important a factor as weight, height, skier type, boot sole length there's also forward pressure.

Any competant shop should ask you questions about how you ski, where you ski, conditions you like to ski, etc. All this determines DIN.

For example: Myself - Level 7-8 skier (type 3 on standard shop card), 200lbs, 5'10", 330mm sole length...On my Look/Rossi bindings that puts me at a 7 DIN. On my frontside groomer zoomer ski's that's fine. On my off-piste, backcountry ski's they are cranked up to 9+ because in some situations I simply can't risk a pre-release.
post #3 of 18
Click image and use image zoom in Mozilla Firefox to read.
post #4 of 18
Age is a factor too ... and a major one. You'll find that out when you pass the big "5-ooh" and they hand em' back with a smile and say sorry cowboy ... yer' days on "10/12" are over.

Older bones break easier ... and yes, I keep them cracked down even though an evil little voice was telling me to get the screwdriver out ...
post #5 of 18
The comment that skier type is just a less specific skier skill level is wrong. A type 1skier is not a beginner, just someone who favors low speeds and lower than normal retention settings, and the opposite is true of type 3 skiers. While it is true that a type 3 skier is usually advanced/expert, this is not always the case- plenty of advanced skiers choose to ski cautiously and just as many less skilled skiers like to ski aggressively.

Also, just a word of advice to anyone having shops do their binding work- type 1- and 3+ are NOT there for your ego. They are solely there to allow shops to put skiers into bindings whose DIN ranges they would not fall into using the traditional skier types- i.e., a lightweight racer on a race binding many times will have a chart DIN under the lowest DIN on the binding.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618 View Post
The comment that skier type is just a less specific skier skill level is wrong. A type 1skier is not a beginner, just someone who favors low speeds and lower than normal retention settings, and the opposite is true of type 3 skiers. While it is true that a type 3 skier is usually advanced/expert, this is not always the case- plenty of advanced skiers choose to ski cautiously and just as many less skilled skiers like to ski aggressively.

Also, just a word of advice to anyone having shops do their binding work- type 1- and 3+ are NOT there for your ego. They are solely there to allow shops to put skiers into bindings whose DIN ranges they would not fall into using the traditional skier types- i.e., a lightweight racer on a race binding many times will have a chart DIN under the lowest DIN on the binding.
You are correct, but so am I...Refer to my statement about the shop asking questions about the actual skier (where they ski, conditions preferred, speed, aggresivenes, etc)and not just level, or "type".

Regardless of the definitions, it still holds true that they shouldn't be setting DIN settings themselves if they have to ask.
post #7 of 18

Start low and tighen if you blow

I'd bet most ski shops give you the 30 second spiel on Type 1,2,3 ask your weight, age and sex and set it to the chart. Anything else and their setting themselves up for your Dr. bills.

I prefer to go low on the DIN, and crank them incrementally if I am blowing out. If you can't stand on your ski and twist either foot out with some effort I would suggest your toes are too tight. Usually toe and heel should be within about 1 DIN. - That's just how I do it. Part of it is your style also, you can ski very fast and hard, but smooth, and you don't need as high of a DIN.(not saying I am particularly smooth)

I also tend to have a lower DIN at the start of the season, and notch it up after I get my ski legs and turn it up a notch on the speed.
post #8 of 18
Din setting is detrimental when its not set to your style. When i was learning how to ski my friend lent me his ski with dins at 7 (I'm 5'10" 130lb)...trashed my knees. Also recently bought new skis did the 30 secound speal while reffering to their card found out i was "Type 3". My dins were set to 6.5 and i think there .5 to high. Had one crash in the trees that involved a lot of pressure on the knee...all i can say thank the ski god i was going fast outherwise i would have tore my knee before release. Long storie short...i ski the slopes advanced/eperts do but i'm not as fast and agresive enough for my current din settings (but like MemoSteve said when i'm skiing back country i want my dins up). So i'm in a bit of delema of what to do leave them or change them and risk lossing one of my new babbies....Just thought i'd give you some food for thought before you get yours set.
post #9 of 18
There is a big window in the selection process that is deliberately broad and wide to limit the liability of the shop. Where I get my work done, you circle what type of skiing you do and initial the form. Keeps the wolves (lawyers), at bay.

Look at the race kids as a prime example. Every year there are a few parents who will take their kids in and every year without fail, the kid is coming out of his/her bindings five gates into the first race. There is no setting for true high end skiers that the shop is going to dial in and every year ...... out come the screwdrivers ..... and with fear and trepidation ... the kids bindings get cranked up while the parent watches and you pray the kid doesn't snap a bone.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the chart it was helpful
post #11 of 18
23




...
post #12 of 18
I agree with wath most people were saying. IF you don't know how to read the cart don't set your own DIN. Skiing with a din too high or low can lead to injuries. Always have them set a a shop that is ceritified. To get certified you need to pass a test for each manufacturer, so they feel it is very important to know what your doing
JP
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
23




...
I don't think the question was for heel and toe DIN added together, but I guess that works.:
Maybe you should say 46
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by D_Rock View Post
Din setting is detrimental when its not set to your style. When i was learning how to ski my friend lent me his ski with dins at 7 (I'm 5'10" 130lb)...trashed my knees. Also recently bought new skis did the 30 secound speal while reffering to their card found out i was "Type 3". My dins were set to 6.5 and i think there .5 to high. Had one crash in the trees that involved a lot of pressure on the knee...all i can say thank the ski god i was going fast outherwise i would have tore my knee before release. Long storie short...i ski the slopes advanced/eperts do but i'm not as fast and agresive enough for my current din settings (but like MemoSteve said when i'm skiing back country i want my dins up). So i'm in a bit of delema of what to do leave them or change them and risk lossing one of my new babbies....Just thought i'd give you some food for thought before you get yours set.
Thats why I twist out while standing, if you've got bad knees thats especially important to know you'll be OK in the slow twisting fall. As for losing your ski... powder cords for sure, or wireless ski locators are also available.
I'd rather yard sale than blow out a knee for sure.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski-2-fly View Post
I'd bet most ski shops give you the 30 second spiel on Type 1,2,3 ask your weight, age and sex and set it to the chart.
I think you're generally right, but in my experience, it's more like a 5-second spiel.

Ski shops typically just have the kid who's talking to you point at the wall-chart with the three little line drawings and ask which one you are, get you to provide the other information that's on the chart (all of which, except for age < or > 50, is in the original post), then look it up on the chart.

The only difference between a ski shop employee looking up the original guy's DIN on the chart and anyone else doing the same thing is that the ski shop has liability insurance.
post #16 of 18
5.25 should be your DIN - according to www.dinsetting.com (assuming you have not reached the big 5-ooh). If you are 50 or older, your DIN should be 4.5. Brings up an interesting point, anybody know why age plays a part in the binding release charts - shouldn't it be based on skill level and measurements only?

This is based on Marker's Binding chart, similar to the Salomon chart above.
post #17 of 18
Here's a quick guide link for DIN setting:
http://www.forskiers.com/gear/din.asp
post #18 of 18
As said above, old bones break more easily, thus the need for a lower release setting.

It may be less risky to crank up the heel release setting. It's usually the toe binding failing to release in time that causes knee ligament damage.

Don't trust the setting scale on the bindings. Spend the extra coupl'a bucks for an actual release test. Some brands are less consistent than other brands, i. e., may give a #7 release at the #6 mark on the scale, or whatever...get the actual test.


Ken
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