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Skiing and College - Page 3

post #61 of 80
[thread detour]

Has EpicSki become a panel at the LSA (or MLA)?

The txting argument towards a revision of linguistic conventions and norms is faulty. While those conventions are entirely appropriate in text messaging or chat rooms (or marketing), they do not hold valence beyond those media, not even in e-mail, really.

Those same arguments were being made in the '90s when e-mail became commonplace. It was to be the end of grammar. Way too many journal articles on the subject. It turns out that e-mail has not altered language at all. It became a new discourse. In the end, the discourse theorists were right: there is a social currency that increases in value with the knowledge of how to participate in (and when to move among) various discourse communities. It's common sense to anyone who speaks more than one language.

As it turns out, grammar and syntax are still accurate indicators of a great many things. Even the Chomskyans agree. Not even a rosy-eyed adjunct or an overzealous TA teaching Freshman Comp would accept a paper written even partly in "txtish" (OK, unless perhaps it were in dialogue.) What do you think university admissions officers are looking for when they read essays/personal statements? Verbal skills are not the only thing, but they are very important.

Imagine a wedding invitation or State of the Union address written in "txtish"? Or a cover letter?

"hey...ur corp is kewl <3 lol...gimme a job @ ur office pls. c u l8r. thx"

[/thread detour]
post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
[thread detour]

Has EpicSki become a panel at the LSA (or MLA)?

The txting argument towards a revision of linguistic conventions and norms is faulty. While those conventions are entirely appropriate in text messaging or chat rooms (or marketing), they do not hold valence beyond those media, not even in e-mail, really.

Those same arguments were being made in the '90s when e-mail became commonplace. It was to be the end of grammar. Way too many journal articles on the subject. It turns out that e-mail has not altered language at all. It became a new discourse. In the end, the discourse theorists were right: there is a social currency that increases in value with the knowledge of how to participate in (and when to move among) various discourse communities. It's common sense to anyone who speaks more than one language.

As it turns out, grammar and syntax are still accurate indicators of a great many things. Even the Chomskyans agree. Not even a rosy-eyed adjunct or an overzealous TA teaching Freshman Comp would accept a paper written even partly in "txtish" (OK, unless perhaps it were in dialogue.) What do you think university admissions officers are looking for when they read essays/personal statements? Verbal skills are not the only thing, but they are very important.

Imagine a wedding invitation or State of the Union address written in "txtish"? Or a cover letter?

"hey...ur corp is kewl <3 lol...gimme a job @ ur office pls. c u l8r. thx"

[/thread detour]
I don't think anyone is going to deliver a State of the Union Addres written in text. Nor a resume, etc... And that wasn't my point, sorry to have not stated it more clearly. I should have been more concise. I do thank you, however, for making my point more valid and clear. Which is that he is ready for college. He is ready to study a variety of languages intertwined with more than one discourse. Without doing so, it will be very obvious he didn't receive any higher education. And you're absolutely right, it is common sense to anyone who speaks more than one language.
Cheers. We're on the same page.
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
Be honest with yourself - you're obviously not ready to go to college to get an education. You're ready to go because you're supposed to go.

Based on your priorities, as well as your grammar and spelling, college isn't your thing right now.

Take a year off, it'll help you figure out what you really want to do.
Old School nailed this one. If your sole reason for attending college is to ski, then just ski. Move to a resort town, get a job, and ski. When you're ready to further your education, then go to college. Otherwise you're wasting your time and money (or your parent's money).
post #64 of 80
Hey boston, is your dad's offer on the table indefinetely? will he pay in years to come after your ski-binge? Say... when you're 26?
If not, I wouldn't consider it a waste of money to take him up on the offer. Most people's first two years are just getting General Courses out of the way anyway. It is entirely feasible that your first two years will not apply directly to your major and may still count towards a degree if you decide to take time off half way. Actually, many of those generals aren't much of a step up from your highschool studies. They honestly don't require all that much attention. Maybe you can get the bogus stuff out of the way when you're not so interested. (which is what 90% of the partying students do.)
Taking time off and then coming back when you want to hit the books may frustrate you in the sense that your classes are kind of gay in the first two years of uni. being 26 in biology 101 can be pretty demeaning. I remember some of those guys talking about how they'd forgotten how to study and so forth too. That may be worth thinking about.

on a side note about money; Student Loans are around 3% wtih consolidations as low as 1%. And often, you can defer the interest and payments until you graduate. You can get a much bigger return than that on very safe investments. I always wondered why the kids who had their education paid for didn't take out loans anyway and invest them elsewhere. (some don't qualify for financial-aid. loans are different.)

Assuming you don't already have one; an IRA (Independent Retirement Account) accrues drastically if you get one while you are still 18. The retirement benefit differences between one who started an IRA when he was 18 and one who started one when he was 26 are mind-numbingly different. We're talking hundreds of thousands of dollars. Student loans, if you don't need them, is practically free money to invest with.
Now how much of a waste-of-money is going to school? Play your cards right, and you should be able to profit.
post #65 of 80
And, Boston, take care of your teeth, and get to bed early; watch the red meat; read more; buy land.
post #66 of 80
Marry rich.
post #67 of 80
Marry a girl who's funny, make your own money...
post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug
My son is awesome and going to RIT
<- Son.

I grew up skiing, and certainly miss it every weekend (especially this year).

I really do not know what else to tell you except what has already been mentioned in this thread. If you want to go to college and are prepared for the consequences, then go. But if you want to ski, then you'll just spend time longingly staring out the window with text books in front of you.

As I said, I love skiing, but I am prepared to sacrifice those recreations in order to do well in college. I probably will join the RIT ski team, but I doubt I will make the main team, so it will also help me work on my studies.

Though to reiterate what everyone else said, try to put of college until you are ready and good luck in your education.
post #69 of 80

Re: Schools

I am biased but I am recommending three Colorado schools. All three have solid academic reputations and are close to the mountains.

1. University of Colorado at Boulder (CU)
2. University of Denver (DU)
3. Colorado State University (CSU)

Can't beat the Colorado Pass: $379 for unlimited skiing at Keystone, Breckenridge and Arapahoe Basin with 10 visits to Vail or Beaver Creek. If you have any questions about these schools, let me know.
post #70 of 80
Thread Starter 
lol i dont know were you guys got the idea that i dont want to go to college in fact i'm looking forward to it and my dad isnt paying for it all he said he could help. I'm going to need student loans to pay for what i can't pay for between money i save from work and grants.
post #71 of 80
How about Spokane? It has Gonzaga and Washigton State. Never been there, but I was just thinking about the same subject since Boise State won one of the Bowl games. Of course, it would be for my son and not me. I would just visit him a little more frequently perhaps.
post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsmeboston View Post
lol i dont know were you guys got the idea that i dont want to go to college in fact i'm looking forward to it and my dad isnt paying for it all he said he could help. I'm going to need student loans to pay for what i can't pay for between money i save from work and grants.

I think some people are justifying not going to school to themselves, boston. remember when I said it was obvious when one hasn't received any higher education? that is an example.

(please don't shoot me non-college promoters, I'm not directing that at anyone or picking a fight. Just a thought as no one I have ever met who finished school recommended to others not to go.)
post #73 of 80
i dont think anyones mentioned my alma mater UMF. University of Maine at Farmington. they have a major in skiing, ski industries degree. it is 40 minutes to the best hill in the east, Sugarloaf; and 50 minutes to Someday bigger, i mean sunday river. if you are part of the ski program, you get an ASC pass, so how can you get wrong. the best part, the girl to guy ratio is like 4 to 1. it is a teachers college so it works out for us. awesome small town, ranked #1 for small schools in the east, in new england, how can you go wrong. ok maybe boulder or bozman but it is the east.
post #74 of 80

anybody mention the University of Utah? Here's a cool site promoting their ski areas: ski.utah.edu.

post #75 of 80

A girl I met on a semester abroad back in the mid-70's claimed that she was majoring in skiing at College of Idaho.

post #76 of 80

Plymouth State University (part of University System of New Hampshire) will get you within easy striking distance of lots of ski areas. UNH in Durham is NOT near any skiing.

 

I also agree with the recommendation of Bend, Oregon. Great small city, beautiful, tons of recreation year round, good climate, and fabulous snow at Mt Batchelor. Oregon would be a great change of pace for a Bostonian. The entire state is beautiful. Great people, too.

post #77 of 80

Here's a suggestion out of left field.  Appalachian State in North Carolina.  Your parents might not even suspect that you'll be close to decent skiing (for the East that is) until they see the area for themselves. 

 

http://www.appstate.edu/

 

They've also usually got a pretty good football team

 

Skiing within 15 minutes:

 

http://www.skisoutheast.com/sugar_mountain/default.htm

 

http://www.skisoutheast.com/ski_beech_mountain/default.htm

 

http://www.skisoutheast.com/appalachian_ski_mountain/default.htm

post #78 of 80

Personally, I would recommend going to the best college that you can get into. I spent my first year of college in Colorado. Good school and had a fantastic time. However after my first year, I realized that school academics were more important to me than the skiing. Ended up transferring to Northwestern University in Chicago. Suffice to say, the skiing sucked, but the whole college experience was outstanding. 

 

Nowadays, I have a job that I love and am able to provide myself and my family with a nice lifestyle. Could I have achieved what I have at another school? Of course, but going to the best school that I could gave me a leg up on the competition. For example, my roommate in college at Colorado had slightly better grades and the same test scores, but it took him 2 years after college to finally get into a medical school (and not one that he really wanted to go to, since it carried an armed forces commitment). I was accepted into five schools after college.

 

Maybe I'm too old fashioned (ha, never thought that would be me!) , but working hard now will give you a huge payoff in the end.

post #79 of 80

Also in Burlington VT is Champlain College.  My son is there in his freshman year right now and I am very impressed.  So far he says he has not had much time to ski but has made a few trips out.

 

here's a list of majors:  Undergrad

 

 

post #80 of 80

 Hey FWIW if your looking at New England schools check out Norwich.  20 minutes to Sugarbush, 30-35 minutes to Stowe, and about 1.25hrs to Killinton.  Military and Civilian sides to the school, and if you choose the corps theres no military obligation after school unless you want.  They also have a Mountain Cold Weather Rescue Team that gets trained to carry out rescues throughout VT.  Skills for life if your looking to live a backcountry lifestyle.  The communications program there is one of the best in the country for video production and an outstanding engineering Dept.

 

Oh yeah I forgot...Video Production as a degree is not bad because TGR is always looking for interns and so is every other ski film company. 

You: "Dad I have to do my college internship"

Dad: "Thats very responsible son glad to see your thinking about your future"

You: "Yeah I know...Dad I need a ticket to JH!"

Dad: "Ummmmm?"


Edited by lbj832 - 2/18/2009 at 03:25 am
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