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Best bang for the lesson buck?

Poll Results: Best lesson choice

 
  • 12% (2)
    1-hour private
  • 12% (2)
    90-minute private
  • 25% (4)
    1/2 day private
  • 12% (2)
    full-day private
  • 37% (6)
    Group lessons
16 Total Votes  
post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
It's been said that the 1-hour private is not an effective way to spend your money. What is the most cost-effective way for an advanced skier to progress with lessons?
post #2 of 20

Flawed

No multihour private on consecutive days.
post #3 of 20
For me at least, the 1hr group lesson is the best deal and you get the same group of instructors as the private lessons. Being a higher level (8-10) you get to more or less choose your instructor. I almost always get a "private" lesson as very few people take lessons once they are "competent" skiers. It also is dirt cheap, at least with the deal through my school: unlimited group lessons and lift tickets after 4:00pm for only $200 (150 for lift, 50 for lessons). Over the course of an average season I save over $1500 in lesson fees; its hard to beat $1 per lesson. If you have this deal available, I would think that it would be difficult to beat.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
It had to be flawed.
post #5 of 20
[shameless plug] ESA event [/shameless plug]
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig View Post
Being a higher level (8-10) you get to more or less choose your instructor. I almost always get a "private" lesson
I agree—a couple of weeks ago, I took a group class midweek (level 7)--turned out to be a group of one! But my biggest breakthroughs have not occurred in classes but rather while skiing with people who are much better than me. Spending hours (actually days!) on the hill with the likes of Uncle Louie, ssh, bong, Rick, and countless other great Bears has done wonders for my skiing (and my budget!). Classes are great for getting out w/someone new who can offer some tips and tricks—then it’s a matter of just getting out and skiing.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube View Post
I agree—a couple of weeks ago, I took a group class midweek (level 7)--turned out to be a group of one! But my biggest breakthroughs have not occurred in classes but rather while skiing with people who are much better than me. Spending hours (actually days!) on the hill with the likes of Uncle Louie, ssh, bong, Rick, and countless other great Bears has done wonders for my skiing (and my budget!). Classes are great for getting out w/someone new who can offer some tips and tricks—then it’s a matter of just getting out and skiing.
Excellent strategy indeed Sugarcube and has worked for me a few times in the past.

That ESA thing is Ok too
post #8 of 20

And the answer is ...

It Depends
post #9 of 20

Another Choice......

free clinics.

I learned more from free bump & powder clinics at Alpine Meadows and Copper Mtn. than any paid lession I ever took.
post #10 of 20
My two "group" lessons ended up being, in essence, four-hour privates.
Works for me.
post #11 of 20
The three best ways aren't on there.

1) Become an instructor, pay your dues teaching beginners while you take as many staff clinics and PSIA events as you can.

2) Do an all-day two-day (or more) academy type lesson somewhere were you are put in a group of like-ability skiers.

3) Do a multi-week program somewhere where you get a two-hour to 1/2-day lesson with the same instructor and/or group every week for several weeks.

Well I suppose 0) would be 2 or 3 above as a private with the best instructor in the world but for multi-day work, groups can be fun, cheaper, and may be just as good.
post #12 of 20
I'm a big proponent of Multi day clinics. I don't know why more ski schools don't offer these typ programs. the success of The ESA is a case in point. people are learning having fun and telling others. I can see ESA doing several academies a season.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
It Depends
seconded!
post #14 of 20
What has helped me the most is season-long group lessons with the same coach -- it becomes a process of working on issues. The coach and you are familiar with each other, and the progression is much more rapid than occurs with repeated diagnosis and remedy. Unfortunately, most ski schools still do not understand the value in such an arrangement. Bummer.

Mike
post #15 of 20
I have always hated teaching 1 hour privates. The people who buy them have this vast list of things they want to "fix" and it just ain't going to happen. It's obviously important to them, but they'd have been much better going for group lessons. Once you're through the wedge/wedge-combo levels, group lessons are generally smaller, with better instructors (whom you can audition for privates). They are much better value for money. And if the lesson sucks, complain (with reasons).
post #16 of 20
For beginners amd intermediates a six week group series will give them a good start and insight with time in between to work out stuff you were shown. I like the continuity of knowing your class and understanding their individual specific needs.
For the very experienced I like the half day private for lots of coaching and intensive work on very specific areas to work on.
So I guess I am adding to the it depends motion.
post #17 of 20
I like the idea of becoming an instructor and spending hours and hours at training and skiing. One single hour won't cure anything, it will likely help someone start changing one thing, maybe two, but skiing probably won't be dramatically different until the student replicates the movements hundreds of times. Band-aids are for little cuts, not major injuries. One hour lessons are like band-aids. Multi day privates are horrendously expensive, but bang for buck would yield the ideal results.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by schanfm View Post
I like the idea of becoming an instructor and spending hours and hours at training and skiing. One single hour won't cure anything, it will likely help someone start changing one thing, maybe two, but skiing probably won't be dramatically different until the student replicates the movements hundreds of times. Band-aids are for little cuts, not major injuries. One hour lessons are like band-aids. Multi day privates are horrendously expensive, but bang for buck would yield the ideal results.
except most (full-time) instructors don't spend hours and hours skiing and training. What they (we) do is spend hours and hours teaching other people how to ski.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49 View Post
I'm a big proponent of Multi day clinics. I don't know why more ski schools don't offer these typ programs. the success of The ESA is a case in point. people are learning having fun and telling others. I can see ESA doing several academies a season.
For me, this is really the only way, whether it's a PSIA clinic or an ESA or some other camp. It's immersion with others. The meals compliment the on-snow time, and there's conversation well into the night. Last year at Snowbird, we were up at the bar at the top of the Cliff lodge and a number of us were doing technique demos next to the tables. What better way to be engaged and learning than to have it be immersion?

Frankly, all of the other options pale in comparison. I'd suggest a once-a-week program as another great option, then a lesson with someone you know or are willing to get to know. So, I didn't vote. Sorry...
post #20 of 20
I haven't tried multi day clinics yet, though it seems to me like they'd be great. I'm hoping to get my skiing up and make it to ESA next year. As a noobie, whenever I go to a new hill I get the one hour private, not to fix a bunch of problems in my skiing, like ant said she's encountered, but to find good runs for my ability level and get tips along the way. Plus with them being small midwestern hills, one hour gives you many runs.

As far as furthering my skiing, I'm looking to take weekly lessons. I found an instructor I clicked with at a hill nearby, but they've been closed for a while now
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