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New skis need to be waxed/ edges done etc???

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I just bought my wife a new pair of Rossi Bandits...we usually buy used gear and i was wondering if they need to be waxed, edges done etc??? I got a steal on these off ebay.....07 bandits ladies version with new look 12P bindings.....190.00 bucks
post #2 of 25
any racer will tell you yes.

that said- most bandits probably never get a proper tune.
post #3 of 25
I ski Rossi Viper X's, Bandit X's, Bandit B3's (two...06' in 184 and 07' in 176). All bought new. They have all come with a workable factory tune.

What I mean by "workable" is that the tune is good enough for most conditions and yes, you could put a better tune on them, but I don't waste the time and take material off the new ski. Just ski them for a few days and then do your normal tuning.

The only thing I would do is hot scrape the bases and then hot wax a few times...If you want top performance and base protection this is a must on any new ski. IMHO.
post #4 of 25
I would say at least check the base for flatness with a true bar. Without getting into whether they should be flat at the tips and the tails, they certainly should be flat along the rest of the base if they are going to see use on groomed slopes. Personally, I'd also check the edges but that's me. Then wax as as been suggested, and go.

As far as a stone grind taking off material and shortening the life of the ski I don't see that as a problem for most people. You will very likely replace the skis with the latest technology four or five years from now before you have ground the skis so often that they have little edge or base left. The only caveat I offer is that the machines, while great, are entirely dependent upon their human operator for the quality of the grind. If you do a stone grind go to a reputable shop that has tuning credentials.

Why all of this? A poorly tuned ski may never make itself known to the skier. The skier may well assume that poor performance is owing to their own deficiencies. This can make for a lot of unnecessary frustration.

Some companies enjoy better reputations than others when it comes to the quality of tune the skis that they produce receive, even though the skis themselves are fine from a design standpoint. However, even among the best companies, it can make a difference where in the production schedule yours skis were when they were stoneground-right before they changed the belt or just after... How much time the ski has had to cure before it's tuned by the factory is another consideration that enters the equation. When the ski continues to set up after leaving the factory, a ski that left flat can wind up convex, concave or both during transit and storage before sale.

I guess my final point is since you spent some real money getting the sks for your wife, it seems worth it to determine that they will perform as they were designed to and that your spouse is having a good experience with the gift that you bought her.
Just my $.02.
post #5 of 25
I would wax. If the edges are sharp, leave them be. If the edges are not sharp enough the sharpen them.
post #6 of 25
I've got to go with edge and wax new skis always. Factory wax doesn't last long often just a few runs and edges are rarely good from the factory and the beating the skis take before you get them. As for the bases, check them with a true bar.
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I would wax. If the edges are sharp, leave them be. If the edges are not sharp enough the sharpen them.
Ditto.

And, if you care about bevels, you'll want to set them. If not, you can take what you get...
post #8 of 25
For the first time in my life I will be on my own ski's this season instead of renting. I planned on skiing my new Metron's a day or two then bringing them into the shop at Solitude for a wax and tuning. What does a tune and wax generally cost at the resorts? I figured I'd rather have someone who sees 100"s of ski's a season do it than go to my local Sport Chalet where the flunky from the shoe department might do a several a year - and chance a sub-par job.
post #9 of 25
Delete. See duplicate post below.
post #10 of 25
I'm not familiar with the shop at Solitude, but resort shops may or may not be the best places to have skis tuned. There are a lot of members here form the SLC area. They can probably give you a line on Solitude's ski tuning operation or suggest some alternatives.

If nothing else make sure that you have a note attached to your skis saying what you want done to your skis. For example:

"Bevel 1 degree base 3 degrees side. Edges sharp tip to tail. DO NOT DULL."

Even with the advent of shaped skis, many skiers continue to make skidded turns. Resort shops know this and often dull tips and tails to facilitate skidding and keep most of their customers happy. Similarly, many shops in the west tune 1 and 2 for base and side bevels. Atomic specs call for 1 and 3. You cannot necessarily rely on a shop to tune to Atomic's specs. Ultimately bevels are a matter of personal preference. However, it makes sense to start out with how the manufacturer believes their skis will perform their best.
post #11 of 25
For new skis, especially Bandits, I'd wax them and then ski. Get to know them first. See what you would want done. The factory bevels might be OK, and if not, take 'em in.

The advice to leave a note taped to your skis saying "DO NOT DULL/DETUNE" is good advice. Part of getting to know your skis will be to see how much you want to detune the tips & tails, and you could easily do that yourself.

Race skis demand a lot of prep; Bandits are not race skis. But, at least wax 'em. Every ski needs wax.
post #12 of 25

New ski advice

I went into Snow & Rock (a leading snowsports shop) with my new skis to get the bindings attached and set-up and (I thought) for an initial waxing.

However, the dude pretty much refused outright claiming that there was "plenty" of wax already and no need to wax them. Being British, I didn't argue the point. Should I have?
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info !!!!!!!!
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malcomtent View Post
However, the dude pretty much refused outright claiming that there was "plenty" of wax already and no need to wax them. Being British, I didn't argue the point. Should I have?
YES! These were new skis, right? Even if they were wrapped in plastic when you bought them, they need wax.

By the bye, it is impossible to 'overwax' a ski. Should you return to this shop, ask the tech dude about hotboxing, to see what he replies.
post #15 of 25
Good advice.

I always wax new skis.

If the factory tune is good, you shouldn't need to do anything to the edges of a new ski. In the old days, the factory tunes were really often not good. Apparently, they're better nowadays. Anyway, mine have been good (though that's much too small a sample to tell you much of anything). The exception was some Elan junior skis - season rentals, but brand new - which had horrifically railed edges. I don't know if that's a slam on Elan, since I have a secret belief that all the kids skis come out of the same one or two factories in Eastern Europe anyway. But you might want to do a quick fingernail check on your kids' skis before forcing the poor tyke to fight down the hill with skis that won't turn.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malcomtent View Post
However, the dude pretty much refused outright claiming that there was "plenty" of wax already and no need to wax them. Being British, I didn't argue the point. Should I have?
"Dude" being the key phrase here. :
post #17 of 25

post #18 of 25

OK that did not work about a year later!  Here is the info.

post #19 of 25

       Nice video! It's important to mention that when planing a cap ski, you do NOT want to cut into the fiberglass material on the side (doing so can cause damage to the ski). You just want to trim down the bumper a bit--but nothing above. On skis which begin and end in a cap and have sandwich in between, I would advise being very careful near tip and tail. smile.gif

 

 

    zenny

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

       Nice video! It's important to mention that when planing a cap ski, you do NOT want to cut into the fiberglass material on the side (doing so can cause damage to the ski). You just want to trim down the bumper a bit--but nothing above. On skis which begin and end in a cap and have sandwich in between, I would advise being very careful near tip and tail. smile.gif

 

 

    zenny

May be true, but I have never had a problem.  Thanks for that input Zentune!  Gotta' have that Zen!  Sometimes  I tune with music; then when I am happy with the ski I dance a bit of Zen!  Oh yea!

post #21 of 25

On another note, sometimes I don't realize that I posted already a long time ago!

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post

May be true, but I have never had a problem.  Thanks for that input Zentune!  Gotta' have that Zen!  Sometimes  I tune with music; then when I am happy with the ski I dance a bit of Zen!  Oh yea!

 

   I figured. Looks like you know your stufficon14.gif. My comment was mainly geared towards others with less experience with trimming/planing.

 

     zenny

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

 

   I figured. Looks like you know your stufficon14.gif. My comment was mainly geared towards others with less experience with trimming/planing.

 

     zenny

Zenny, that good to give your input!  That's how others can learn and be helped, from others with the knowledge.  As much as I try to cover it all, there is always more.

post #24 of 25
totally agree!! its cool to see other peoples methods...smile.gif

someday when i get the time i may post some tuning videos as well.

zenny
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

totally agree!! its cool to see other peoples methods...smile.gif

someday when i get the time i may post some tuning videos as well.

zenny

That's good because folks who want to become a real ski bum like me, they need to know this stuff.  It make all the difference in how well one can ski and carve a ski.  Be good!   Now I'm back to my ski shop.  Year around care of bases is needed.  This is also the time to be sure everyting is up to par on the tunes.  I have several ski tuning videos at my YT channel.  I aslo have a playlist of how NOT to tune a ski!

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › New skis need to be waxed/ edges done etc???