or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Whats with the duct tape and screws?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Whats with the duct tape and screws? - Page 3

post #61 of 111
Performance levels?

I'll duct tape my rear tags on the back of my C-5.

That's the only way you'll ever see em' cause it'll never be through your rear view mirror.

post #62 of 111
Thread Starter 
C-5 is a cute car if your into that sort of thing, girl I dated once had one. I like cars with a bit more character power and steel, like 700+hp BB Olds via Hurst engineering Course the supercharged chevy powered 86 XJ I have pushing 450hp is no slouch either.
post #63 of 111
Thread Starter 
LOL just realized that the ad on epicski for backcountry.com says 'ditch the duct tape thousands of new jackets on sale'...funny stuff.
post #64 of 111
SO..if a skier was able to find some mediocre mid-80s gear, and refit it with some expensive aftermarket parts, or even fabricate something altogether new, though not out of duct tape of course, and give it a nice paintjob, then that would be OK? I'm asking because your arguments about old Jeep Cherokees could be used by some die-hard skiers.

But skiing and cruising the Francis Louis Boulevard aren't quite the same thing.

If you ever get to ski out west, let me know. I'd like to see your reaction as you strain to see if that guy smokin' you is really wearing a Carhartt snowmobile suit with duct-taped knees or not.

[The XJ Cherokee was a great suburban "SUV"...my wife drove one for years. But when Jeep abandoned the original Cherokee/Wagoneer design in favor of a lighter, cheaper aluminum unibody design, they seriously hampered its off-road ability. It's good for a town car that hits the logging roads ocassionally or needs the 4x4 when the weather gets bad. As for your claim that it, the XJ, is the original SUV (it's not even the original Cherokee), you might want to google the International Harvester Scout and especially the Land Rover, which must be the most succesful "SUV" ever produced. They *still* make 'em and you find them all over the world.]
post #65 of 111
So an XJ is a jeep? I thought all along he was talking about Jaguars.
post #66 of 111
For anyone interested, you can go to the RedGreen Web site and sign up for their forum and share your many uses of duct tape.

I personally liked the jet ski he made out of an old snowmobile.
post #67 of 111
: Photo? 700 hp ski rig?
post #68 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
: Photo? 700 hp ski rig?
No not ski rig a 75 Hurst/Olds...youll be able to see it on TV in a few weeks my bro and I participated in a reality show on Spike with it. Lets just say the Murcielago met its match

The Jeep is not a ski rig either its a street Jeep. My monster trail Jeep is only 225hp.
post #69 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
No not ski rig a 75 Hurst/Olds...youll be able to see it on TV in a few weeks my bro and I participated in a reality show on Spike with it. Lets just say the Murcielago met its match
Pinks?
post #70 of 111
How about this creative way to get down the hill?
Note the duct tape, fixing the tobbagons to the pic nic table
This is from RedGreen.
post #71 of 111

Duct, Duct, Goose!

It has been known for decades that Duct Tape is the preferred tool of choice in Vermont. Known to repair most anything - use spans well beyond ski season.

So much so that when a ski bud and Vt. Native built his home in VT, it was the obvious choice for a housewarming gift.....
post #72 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
SO..if a skier was able to find some mediocre mid-80s gear, and refit it with some expensive aftermarket parts, or even fabricate something altogether new, though not out of duct tape of course, and give it a nice paintjob, then that would be OK? I'm asking because your arguments about old Jeep Cherokees could be used by some die-hard skiers.

But skiing and cruising the Francis Louis Boulevard aren't quite the same thing.

If you ever get to ski out west, let me know. I'd like to see your reaction as you strain to see if that guy smokin' you is really wearing a Carhartt snowmobile suit with duct-taped knees or not.

[The XJ Cherokee was a great suburban "SUV"...my wife drove one for years. But when Jeep abandoned the original Cherokee/Wagoneer design in favor of a lighter, cheaper aluminum unibody design, they seriously hampered its off-road ability. It's good for a town car that hits the logging roads ocassionally or needs the 4x4 when the weather gets bad. As for your claim that it, the XJ, is the original SUV (it's not even the original Cherokee), you might want to google the International Harvester Scout and especially the Land Rover, which must be the most succesful "SUV" ever produced. They *still* make 'em and you find them all over the world.]
Bettering, reinventing, and altering their gear is one thing, sticking sheet rock scews into clearly way past prime skis, is a totally different thing all together.

Francis Lewis Blvd....LOL you know the hood well. Was my main cruising area in my youth.

As far as the the Jeep, I don’t want to keep getting off topic here. But Ill say this much the Jeep Cherokee owes its success to that deviation in utilizing a unitized body over a body-on-frame construction. Technically, it is called a uniframe, different from a unibody. This imparted previously unfound rigidity and lightweight to a 4x4 vehicle. The chassis is steel by the way not aluminum, these factors gave it a power to weight ratio better than anything in its class; aluminum bodies and frames actaully cost way more than steel. Its wheel base, weight power made it even better off road than the Wrangler. The XJ now has more aftermarket support than it did when it was in production, and is considered THE 4x4 to build up for racing and off-roading when not going all out to a tube chassis rock buggy. In Police trials, the XJ outperformed the Caprice Classis, Explorer and Crown Victorias on all accounts…exception was seating room and ergonomics for gear-laden officers. The Land Rover is a make like Jeep is. Range Rover, Discovery, LRII, etc. is a model. Now if you are going to argue about makes, then Jeep has you beat there, they are the originator of the species. Incidentally, Land Rover's Range Rover was aluminum, with steel frames, which are notorious for galvanic corrosion. The new Range Rovers are now unitized construction and are steel. International is a defunct company as far as passenger vehicles. The 84 Jeep Cherokee was the first compact sport-utility vehicle to offer a 5-door body style, previous to it everything was either only 3 door or very large. It was also the first to emphasis the sport part, and was built from the ground up to be an SUV not a truck or car with an SUV body attached to it. In all its years of production it went through only minute changes, it basically remained the same vehicle all those years, unlike the Rovers which have gone through at least 3 complete redesigns since the XJ’s inception. The internet and car books are full of info about this, its not hearsay.

As far as a grocery getter, sure it can do a great job as that even if your groceries happen to be on top of a mountain, sadly most XJ owners do not realize the unlimited potential of the great vehicle that they own:



Man, talk about getting off topic! Sorry Jeeps are my thing.
post #73 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Pinks?
No its called Bullrun, they started running the promos already, Im in the commercials! But it will air in March. Ten episodes....Im psyched!
post #74 of 111
"Rover" is the make; "Land Rover" evolved into a marque under that. Prior to the 1970s there was only one Land Rover, made by Rover, until the Range Rover was introduced. The Defender series is the current avatar of the original Land Rover; they had to give it its own name in the early 1990s once they had more offerings than simply the Land Rover and Range Rover, and for nearly all of the English-speaking world, and much of the non-anglophone world, "Land Rover" refers to that vehicle and its antecedents.

Its not unlike the history of the "Jeep" marque. There was only one "Jeep" until they started to introduce other models. And for many, the sole term "Jeep" will mean the Wrangler/CJ lineage of vehicles.

If those pics are of your Cherokees, then they are impressive. Modified like that, I have no doubt that they are very capable off-road vehicles.

Congratulations on your show.

If you want to see some *really* old gear, try spending time in the BC. You'll run into some seriously old-school telemarkers on superannuated gear, but they perform magic on it.
post #75 of 111
K2 twin tips seem to come with screws on them already.
post #76 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
"Rover" is the make; "Land Rover" evolved into a marque under that. Prior to the 1970s there was only one Land Rover, made by Rover, until the Range Rover was introduced. The Defender series is the current avatar of the original Land Rover; they had to give it its own name in the early 1990s once they had more offerings than simply the Land Rover and Range Rover, and for nearly all of the English-speaking world, and much of the non-anglophone world, "Land Rover" refers to that vehicle and its antecedents.

Its not unlike the history of the "Jeep" marque. There was only one "Jeep" until they started to introduce other models. And for many, the sole term "Jeep" will mean the Wrangler/CJ lineage of vehicles.

If those pics are of your Cherokees, then they are impressive. Modified like that, I have no doubt that they are very capable off-road vehicles.

Congratulations on your show.

If you want to see some *really* old gear, try spending time in the BC. You'll run into some seriously old-school telemarkers on superannuated gear, but they perform magic on it.
Thanks!

Those are not my Jeeps, my Jeeps are actually even more modified than those, but I dont have any cool photos like that. But all it takes are 31" tires on an otherwise stock XJ and you have a serious contender, they are that good, know former Hummvee H1 drivers that are converts.

Yeah I am sure that in the more hardcore areas far far away from metro NYC I would find even more duct tape and screws. Incidentally I asked the oldtimer I saw on the lift with the screws in his skis whats was going on there, he laughed and said its about the third time he had repared them, and that they were coming apart again....he said it might finally be time to get new skis...I said, you think?...and we both laughed as went up to the top of the mountain. Good times.
post #77 of 111
This thread reminds me of a stupid joke:

Why is duct tape like the Force?

It has a dark side and a light side and it holds the universe together.
post #78 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
Now I know not everyone can afford new gear on a regular basis, but whats with some people skiing with vintage crap that has already delaminated, and even broken apart then screwing it together with sheet rock screws? And how about the people who go around with duct taped gloves and jackets???? I mean you can go on ebay or even to any store and get stuff on clearance that is only a season or two old that costs less than some lift tickets and is better than the 80's circa stuff these people are running...I just dont get it, is this a cool thing to do? Man if my stuff fell apart like that there is only one place where it would be seen...the trash can. This past week in Stowe I saw some kid racers with taped up Reusch gloves, I saw a guy with screws all around the edges of his straight k2 skis, and a kid with duct tape all over the front of his Lange boots. I almost felt like donating some money to help them get some new gear! Ive even seen instructors and patrol with gear in various states of disarray...is this some medal of honor to go around with used-beyond-life-span gear?
Those people are called "skiers".

Not everyone has the kind of money you do, Lakshmi Mittal.
post #79 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
. . . .how about the people who go around with duct taped gloves and jackets????. . ...is this some medal of honor to go around with used-beyond-life-span gear?

Anecdote:

In January 2006 I was skiing my first run of the season in brand new $150 pants. . .and busted. One of my skis came off and somehow made a 3 inch slice in the side of the right pant leg. . (Total fluke, I've skied a bunch of days since with no further damage). .

When I got home, I showed them to the people at the ski shop where I got them, but there was no way they were taking them back.

One piece of duct tape solved the problem. I think they've got more character now. There was no phreaking WAY I was throwing them out having JUST PURCHASED them.
post #80 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
Those people are called "skiers".......

Perfect answer
post #81 of 111
I have told the story about skiing 30in of untracked at Windham with one of my bindings duct taped to my ski.

I used to wear hard plastic kneepads under my pants, which could cut the pants if I hit my knee on icy or abrasive snow. So I had one strip of duct tape on each of the knees of my ski pants. The tape held tight for years. I thought it made my knees more visible like a mogul competetor and it gave me the core local look. When it finally wore off, I saw that there was no hole and I thought to myself, what a poser, you put duct tape to look cool, no repair was needed! Actually there are some small holes that don't go all the way through. I guess I taped them to prevent further damage. It worked, those 11 year old pants are my favorites, you can still see where the duct tape was.

I suppose I could afford some bibs from Costco, but I prefer my vintage Burtons.
post #82 of 111
I have a tiny piece of duct tape holding together the little plastic tip on one of my brakes. It's been there for years. Without it I'd have no longer have a tip on that brake.
post #83 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
Those people are called "skiers".
Not everyone has the kind of money you do, Lakshmi Mittal.



just returning
post #84 of 111
Who cares if their clothing is duct taped? As long as it keeps them dry/warm. As far as the race kids go, duct tape is a way of life for racers. You wouldn't believe the amount of duct taped gear I've seen at some pretty serious race clubs. The only thing I semi-agree with is the straight skis, specifically parents who stick their kids on 20 year old straight skis cause its "good enough for what they're doing". I'm not talking 2 year old todlers, I'm talking kids in their "formative years" of learning to ski. Now I know skiing is an expensive sport and many families can't afford new gear, but nowadays there's lots of pretty old gear that is still much better than straight skis and can often be had for cheap or even free. I see shaped skis for kids 6-12 at swaps and ebay all the time for $25 or less. Sticking a kid on ancient straight skis is not only starting them off on the wrong track (learning to ski an absolutely obsolete piece of equipment) but often boarderline dangerous since usually those old skis come with bindings that shops will no longer agree to work on/safety check. For the older people still rocking straight skis, well, to each his own, but you're missing out.
post #85 of 111
My ski edges sliced several different fingers on one of my $75 gloves. We were out of duct tape, but my husband, being a ski patroller, had some first-aid tape in his backpack. So, we wrapped it around the glove fingers that had been ripped. Four years later, that first-aid tape is still on those gloves, but since they're packed out, they are now my spring ski gloves. I'd hate to toss out my favorite gloves, they work just perfectly, and they ARE still waterproof and breathable...

Who knows, first-aid tape might give me even more personal steeze than duct tape...:

Thatsagirl
post #86 of 111
I know for a fact that the space shuttle doesn't launch without a roll of duct tape on board. They wouldn't take it if they didn't use it. I think the shuttle is considerably more expensive than new ski equipment.

Quote:
I've even seen instructors and patrol with gear in various states of disarray...is this some medal of honor to go around with used-beyond-life-span gear?
We do accept tips to go in our gear replacement fund. I don't know how many warm brand new gloves of mine have been sliced up while teaching snowboarding.
post #87 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
But in the case of the screwed together 1986 skis...just throw them away....youll be happy you did.
Bah!

There is a clear upgrade path with Designer Rivets*




*TM some Viking or Saxon dood
post #88 of 111
Another thing, while on a backpacking trip I burnt a hole through one of my boots. So much for the waterproofing. I put on some ducttape and voila, Waterproof again. At least until it falls off anyway.
post #89 of 111
Devils Fiddle ...... weren't using that boot as a bong were you? :
post #90 of 111
re: sheetrock screws, aside from their intended purpose sheetrock screws are the most useless fastener available they are brittle and rust like it's going out style so the dude who fixed his ski with them will not be skiing them for long...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Whats with the duct tape and screws?