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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Brush, do you need a 'ski' brush? Plastic or Brass?
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Brush, do you need a 'ski' brush? Plastic or Brass?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm sure like any tool, you put a specialty name in front of it (boat, jewelry, ski) you double or triple the price for the same tool.

So, do I have to spend $15-20 or more on a special brush to brush my skis after waxing?

Also, what's preferred for after waxing/scraping-- brass, white plastic, or blue plastic? Does it make a big difference?

I have a $2.85 blue plastic bristle brush from a hardware store with bristles about 80% as stiff as the bristles on a ski brush. I used it after waxing/scraping and my skis look real good. There's some fine structure instead of the glazed base you get if you just scrape and rub. Now for a non-racing sport skier, is this good enough?

Looks to me like it is but I'm just learning to do a little better job maintaining my boards.
post #2 of 20
While far from an expert on tuning, I am an expert on reusing/recycling/being cheap/frugal/thrifty. I use a new brass grill brush, scotch brite pads, and stiff nylon scrub brush purchased at local "deep discounter" for about a total of $5 for after scraping treatment of my skis. These brushes all have nice handles and work great IMO. I don't use them for anything else, they just stay in the ski tune kit, which is an old two gallon paint bucket w/lid, cleaned out and recycled!!!

I believe these work just as well as other specialty skiing brushes. Just choose wisely in shape and size, along with holding comfort.
post #3 of 20
Sounds like you'll be OK.

I use a brash brush prior to waxing to get the old gunk out followed by a few sweeps with a coarse scotch brite-like fiber pad.

After waxing I take a few passes with a stiff nylon brush followed by a fine fiber pad.

Works great !!!
post #4 of 20
To get the in-the-grooves polishing action of a round-tip bristle brush you could try to lightly singe one side of it with a lighter.

Hair brushes with short boar bristles work really well (better than generic nylon ones, IMO) to clean deep structure, clean tools, and clean wax polishing corks when they develop a glaze.


BTW keep an extra one of those $3 brushes in your pack for when you head home.

Brush out the snow from the bindings for much, much fewer rust problems.
post #5 of 20
I agree a good middle and versatile brush would be a stiff horsehair or other animal hair brush. You might want to also consider a soft multipurpose nylon bench/shop or other brush to clean off bases of excess dust and wipe with a towel before using the nylon fiber pad. It'll extend it's life by not getting gunked up faster. Some people like polishing with a fiberlene towels which are also useful for cleaning. The brass brush can be judiciously used to impart base structure as well as free structure with harder waxes. By adjusting pressure and number of strokes, you can get by with a lot of off the shelf brushes for multiple tasks, including getting your best glide.
post #6 of 20
normally id agree that generic is fine, and in this case it may be, but why cheap out? You have skis that may have cost you $400 plus. What is 20-25 on a decent brush or 2? I would think of it as investment. I have a brass and a nylon brush that I bought from tognar and together they cost less than $25. They will last a long time and will make things much easier when actually brushing. Also consider that if you are going to invest the time tuning, why risk not having the best possible wax job.

I kind of compare it to the people with $3000 LCD or Plasma TV's that are to cheap to buy a decent home theater package for audio or pay the cable an extra $10 a month for the HD programming.

It is what it is, but i would just buy some decent brushes, it will make brushing out the bases much easier. On the other hand, if you skis are old and you dont really care mush and just want a quick "okay" job, im sure all of the above mentioned ideas would be fine.
post #7 of 20
Both of my daughters went through the race program at Okemo. Like many dutiful parents, I got caught up in trying to help my kids have an edge and bought good quality tools from reliable racing and race place. That was over ten years ago, I still use the tools several times a week on the wife's three pairs of skis and on my quiver. There is nothing like a tool that is designed for a purpose and does its job the right way. Get the best tools you can afford and learn to use them by using them every time you go out on the snow.
post #8 of 20
Related brush question: recently I've started using my brass brush after waxing and scraping--three or four passes to get more excess wax out. I know you're supposed to use a softer brush, but it seems more effective to use the harder brush.
Bad idea if I'm racing? I do fibertex and scotchbrite following this.
And even after a lot of scraping, the brass brush pulls up a fair amount of excess wax.
post #9 of 20
I skied for more than forty years without brushing my skis. I recently acquired a nylon ski brush which I use, but I can't tell the difference. Hair brush, no brush, you'll be OK. Yes to brush off snow and towel dry after skiing, rust never sleeps.
post #10 of 20
Do you "need" specific brushes? NO.
Do you need to wax or sharpen? NO.

However waxing and brushing consitutes proper maint. of your skis. As owner of a US based ski tuning brush manufacturer I can't even begin to tell you how much research goes into a brush. Bristle length, diameter, hardness, etc. We spend tons on R&D annually. Proper education and use of ski tuning products in general = favorable results.

Summary- Can I get the equivalent tune using a grill brush and candle wax? I doubt it.
post #11 of 20
McMaster Carr is a great resource for stuff like this.
While I buy a lot of my stuff from SlideWright I've found things like fine brass bristle brushes (grill cleaners are way too stiff IMO) and many other items at cheaper-than-ski-specific pricing.
My vises (both screw clamp and lasso style) are both from McMC at low prices.
post #12 of 20
You can buy a SMALL pocket brush for shorter money or try this...Split a brush.

Get a buddy. Buy a brass and Nylon. Take a hacksaw (you need a blade that will cut metal) and cut each in half.

This fall I cut off about a third of an older nylon brush ithat I keep in my pocket for a quick final brush on race night. TIP. If you cut one, do it outside. Bristles go everywhere and make a mess.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nilaszewski View Post
normally id agree that generic is fine, and in this case it may be, but why cheap out? You have skis that may have cost you $400 plus. What is 20-25 on a decent brush or 2?.
Thats exactly correct. Life is way to short to drink cheap beer and use crappy tools. Nothing more gratifying than using good tools built for the job while swilling good beer. Buy the best tools you can afford.

My neighbor tunes his kids ski's for JR races. They were doing construction in his garage so he came over and was cleaning the kids base with some crappy brush he had. I gave him my Toko brass brush to use. After he was finished he said: " Wow that Toko brush really works well"

Snow has been here a long time Mountains have been here a long time. You are hear relatively a flash in time. Enjoy it while you can.

P.S.
Go into the ski shop off season and pick them up in the bargain bin for half price.
post #14 of 20
We're having a 20% off sale on brushes and Moonflexes, etc. With the Epic Supporter Discount (good through the 22nd), you get an additional 20% off.
post #15 of 20
How do you get the Epic Ski Supporter Discount? I am looking to buy some tools soon.
post #16 of 20
Supporter discounts are listed in the Supporter Lounge.

Support EpicSki and get better deals.c
post #17 of 20

as long as we're shopping....

Alpinord,

Nice web-shop! I hadn't visited before, but you may make several sales today. Along with wax and brushes, I've been looking for a small edging tool, and you seem to have several, including two orange-body 3-in-1 models by Tools4Boards. They look very similar online... can you tell me difference between model #2002TX and #T2017?

Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
We're having a 20% off sale on brushes and Moonflexes, etc. With the Epic Supporter Discount (good through the 22nd), you get an additional 20% off.
post #18 of 20
p.s. Sorry, I stumbled into this through the back door, and hadn't noticed that there was an entire thread reviewing the T4B Razor!

Having read, though, I think my question still stands, as to any difference between these two T4B models?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKN View Post
Alpinord,

Nice web-shop! I hadn't visited before, but you may make several sales today. Along with wax and brushes, I've been looking for a small edging tool, and you seem to have several, including two orange-body 3-in-1 models by Tools4Boards. They look very similar online... can you tell me difference between model #2002TX and #T2017?

Thanks!
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKN View Post
I've been looking for a small edging tool, and you seem to have several, including two orange-body 3-in-1 models by Tools4Boards. They look very similar online... can you tell me difference between model #2002TX and #T2017?
Thanks DKN. The Razor (2002TX) was just reviewed.

The Razor (2002TX) and the Xact (T2017) are both capable of multiple angles for base and side edges, along with sidewall cutting. The Razor uses different peg lengths to set the angles, while the Xact uses and asymmetrical angle dial. Both hold any length file or stones for side edges. The Xact only holds the included or comparable short file for base edges, while the Razor can hold any stone or file length, up to 6mm thick. This difference is less of an issue for some than others as the side edge bevel is where you sharpen the most with stones. I haven't had any big issues just using the Swiss file for base edges only. Feel free to give a shout if you have more questions.
post #20 of 20
Thanks, Alpinord! Very helpful, just what I needed, and my credit card is already in hand.

Apologies to group for slight detour... now back to brushes......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Thanks DKN. The Razor (2002TX) was just reviewed. The Razor (2002TX) and the Xact (T2017) are both capable of multiple angles for base and side edges, along with sidewall cutting. The Razor....
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Brush, do you need a 'ski' brush? Plastic or Brass?