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PMTS near Boston? - Page 9

post #241 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
If you are 100% on the outside ski, what happens when something knocks that ski off the rails?
BK
It's never happened yet. Being 100% on the outside ski while tipping the free foot gives me control. If something were to knock that outside ski off (hasn't happened yet), then I'd instantly make the inside ski the weighted ski. Or try to anyway.
post #242 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
I try to "slice through" crud rather than lifting to avoid it.

Not saying you actually do slice through! It is my mental image to stay forward and balanced.

To me, this leads to one of those "aha" moments when you get it right.
Thanks for the advice! I think you’re onto something. Mental imaging helps a lot with skiing.
post #243 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post
It's never happened yet. Being 100% on the outside ski while tipping the free foot gives me control. If something were to knock that outside ski off (hasn't happened yet), then I'd instantly make the inside ski the weighted ski. Or try to anyway.
The comment above was an answer to Bode asking about what happens if you ski with only one ski on the snow in crud.

First it depends on what you mean by crud. If you mean something this is hardpak and/or frozen then the one footed approach might be useful (I say might be because even in those conditions I keep both feet on the ground).

If the crud has any depth then its hard for me to imagine anyone skiing this type of crud with grace and style with 100% of their weight on the stance foot (I suspect the skier would get tossed all over the place until they fell). All of the high lvl skiers I know (PMTS or otherwise) ski with two feet in powder and crud. I agree that you can rapidly move from the outside ski to the inside ski, but this is going to be easier if both skis are on the ground and in powder and crud you want to be skiing with weight on both skis (the weight distribution probably won't be 50/50 except at the float but weight is carried on both feet throughout the turn). PMTS teaches two footed skiing for off piste conditions. This is covered in the 2nd book and at the camps.

Its important to understand that the Phantom Move doesn't need to have a lifted stance foot to work (also covered in the books).
post #244 of 256
Max_501, this makes sense to me, as well. In fact, when we ramp up the speed in what I think of as crud (cut-up new snow, days old snow, even mashed potatoes), the snow tosses our skis around enough that we need to allow for surprises very frequently.

While I could do it, I'm not sure I'd want to spend a lot of time one-footed skiing in those conditions for safety reasons. There's a lot less to respond to the surprises if I have a foot in the air, and I'd be concerned what a nice chunk of snow hitting the ski just wrong could do to me! :
post #245 of 256
I'm only talking about slight crud. An obstacle here and there. For those it's easier to just lift my ski over the trash than to go though it.
post #246 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
I know Glenn well. We are on the hill together regularly. His skiing is improving.
So your a hot shot. Why not tell us who you are.
post #247 of 256
No Volklskier, You have the wrong impression. I'm a seasoned old race coach. Ex-LIII PSIA, I currently teach 12 and under athletes. Full time. I use ski poles. Accurate skiing is what I teach. Glenn does some bootwork for some of our athletes. I wear his footbed. I assist him with his on snow awareness. I ski Volkl too!

Frankly, I like Harb's material. It's clear, and yes, very good skiers utliize the skills addressed. Ski accuracy is a good thing.

I asked for a Black Cert for a reason. Where are they? In PSIA, there's examiners and dev teams and dcl's and stuff, yet in PMTS you cant even find a Black Cert. Again, guess you gotta be real good.

And no Max, I don't think a black level is overkill for groomers. No offence to the blues.
post #248 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post
I'm only talking about slight crud. An obstacle here and there. For those it's easier to just lift my ski over the trash than to go though it.
I guess it depends on what the "trash" is. If it's an ice chunk, you bet! Frozen groomer glop, too. But, if it's some kind of semi-fresh snow, I like blasting through it. It's fun, and I love to see it explode on impact. Like a slush bump in the spring!

But, I wouldn't call obstacles "crud," either. Crud conditions to me are at least cut-up new snow, and perhaps mashed potatoes, frozen chicken heads, or other such less-than-stellar snow surface. As a result, you can't really lift a ski over something and be done. It's consistent enough that you have to ski it somehow.

How would you ski those kinds of conditions, NYCJIM?
post #249 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
...I like blasting through it. It's fun, and I love to see it explode on impact.
Yeah, me too, except when its a friggin log in disguise! Found one yesterday. Scared the crap out of me, luckily it launched me rather than taking me down.
post #250 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
It's consistent enough that you have to ski it somehow.

How would you ski those kinds of conditions, NYCJIM?
Not sure.

I'm a releatively new skier (4 years). I ski groomed trails. When I occassionally encounter some obstacles, I find lifting a ski over the junk can be easier than not.

In short, I ski like I drive. When i see a pothole, I'm not too eager to put the car into it. If I can easily go around it, I'll do it.
post #251 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post
Not sure.

I'm a releatively new skier (4 years). I ski groomed trails. When I occassionally encounter some obstacles, I find lifting a ski over the junk can be easier than not.

In short, I ski like I drive. When i see a pothole, I'm not too eager to put the car into it. If I can easily go around it, I'll do it.
Interesting...

I can understand this for "obstacles" (like Max's log! : ), but don't think this way for snow in any of its forms. Especially since there's often another one nearby, and if I get off one ski, that may be the ski that hits it. So, I'll avoid it with my line if I don't want to ski near it.

However, as you expand your skiing experience, I hope you get the opportunity to ski ungroomed terrain. These are the kinds of conditions that we mean when we say, "Crud." And you will find that skiing them two-footed will be very important for your balance and ability to ski it smoothly.
post #252 of 256
Thanks for the help. I look forward to putting it into practice when some cold and snow hits the northeast!

-Jim
post #253 of 256
I attended the PMTS All-Mountain camp at Arapahoe Basin last week. Crawford Pierce, former US Ski Team Men’s Technical Coach and US Regional Racer Development Director, Program Director, Crested Butte Race Academy, skied with us at the camp. He explained that the U.S. Ski Team has training manuals and standards for tactics and other aspects of racing, but nothing for basic excellent skiing technique which some developing racers lack. They're looking at PMTS and "Essentials of Skiing" to fill this need. Some of the development programs are already using the book.

By the way, I learned a lot from the camp and recommend a PMTS camp highly--I really like the way I ski using PMTS techniques. The coaches, Bob, Rich, Dianna, Jay, and even HH himself, are totally approachable, courteous, have the ability to spot the skier's problems and the underlying reason for the problems, and to express the solution in clear, understandable terms. Yes, not many PMTS coaches around the country, and few PMTS ski schools. As Harald told me, "how do they retrain 300 instructors?" And, full retraining of instructors is necessary. I've now skied with two PSIA full cert instructors that are also PMTS trained, and they tell me that they teach PMTS to their private lessons.


Ken
post #254 of 256
Ken, glad to hear you had a good time. I would hope that PSIA/PMTS instructors would teach skiing in private lessons, not one particular type - otherwise they aren't necessarily giving the students what they want or need! - I prefer instructors who teach students, not systems.
post #255 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
Yes, not many PMTS coaches around the country, and few PMTS ski schools. As Harald told me, "how do they retrain 300 instructors?" And, full retraining of instructors is necessary.
Ken
did i just read what i think i just read????
post #256 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy View Post
did i just read what i think i just read????
Wow, I guess someones math skills leave a little to be desired.

And just out of curiosity, how many PMITA instructors ore there, and how ever does he train them.
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