or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Group Lesson or Private Lesson (which do I choose)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Group Lesson or Private Lesson (which do I choose)

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,

So I'm planning on taking lessons to improve my technique. I want to work on skiing Bumps/Moguls and I want an Instructor to annalyze my current technique and correct anything I'm doing wrong. My main concern is my Inside ski. I don't think I have full control at higher speeds and steeper terrain, like I do on a Blue run over my inside ski.

So my question is this. Hunter has Private lessons and Group Seminars. They hold a Group lesson to teach Bumps, Moguls and steeps. So I'm debating to either take that group lesson or Get a 3 hour lesson from a private instructor. Please Advise...and please don't say taking both. I'm looking for the solution that will help me out faster and more efficientely.

Also any Idea to why my inside ski is so out of control ? I'm assuming it's weight balance, so I tried putting more pressure on the inside ski and when I do so I catch edges...any Ideas ?


All your input is appriciated..


~X marks the Spot~
post #2 of 17
Find out who is teaching the bump clinic and try to book them for a private. Either way would probably be good though.
post #3 of 17
I think a one-on-one private is likely to get you the most possible input in a given amount of time. Group lessons have the advantage that while the instructor is working with someone else, you can practice. But, you certainly don't get the instructors full attention for the entire time...
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks Guys,

I'll probably do a 2 or 3 hour private lesson... 2 hour lesson is only $130 at hunter...that ain't bad.
post #5 of 17
If you can afford a two or three hour private then do it.
If you are trying to get the most value for your $$ then do a group lesson on a weekday (good chance it will wind up being a private). Lessons at the higher levels have few students and the small group size and longer time on snow will give you the most return on your investment. One hour wonders are OK for a quick tune up or a quick launch to the next lower level but at the higher end Steeps, Deeps, and Bumps time and mileage are as important as input.
post #6 of 17
Actually, I'd go the clinic! It'd be cheaper, and you'd have a very bump-specific instructor, plus you could see and hear what was happening with the other students, which is great sideways learning.

Not all resorts offer skill or terrain-specific group lessons, so take advantage when they do!
post #7 of 17
Your post is a bit confusing.

You want to work on bumps/moguls ...

and ...

You don't have full control at higher speeds on steeper terrain.

Sounds like a three hour private would sort thing out quite nicely where the concentration could be spit between the two issues.

My fear in a clinic or small group is that there is always one person who seems to demand attention and dominates the group.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Your post is a bit confusing.

You want to work on bumps/moguls ...

and ...

You don't have full control at higher speeds on steeper terrain.

Sounds like a three hour private would sort thing out quite nicely where the concentration could be spit between the two issues.

My fear in a clinic or small group is that there is always one person who seems to demand attention and dominates the group.
how's my post confusing ? I want to work on skiing moguls and I want better controll over my inside ski in certain situations. But I know what you mean, it's two seperate issues so a group clinic woudn't be ideal like a private lesson...

thanks guys...


Any Idea to why I don't have as much controll over my inside ski as I do on my outside ski ? weight balance ? any input is appriciated.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity View Post
how's my post confusing ? I want to work on skiing moguls and I want better controll over my inside ski in certain situations. But I know what you mean, it's two seperate issues so a group clinic woudn't be ideal like a private lesson...

thanks guys...


Any Idea to why I don't have as much controll over my inside ski as I do on my outside ski ? weight balance ? any input is appriciated.
If you don't have good control of your indide ski you have a balance problem. Try picking it up, and try pulling it back under you. If you can't pick it up, you definitely have a balance problem.
Before you can learn to ski moguls, you need good balance, and strong flexion and extension for pressiure managemant. Once you have those skills, it's easy to learn the tactics you need for moguls.
Between private lessons and a multi day group program, I'll take the group every time. Private lessons are a hit or miss deal, unless you know the instructor. My experience has been that when ski schools market multi day clinics, they generally choose instructors pretty caerfully based on what the program goals are. Everyone involved is looking develop a new area of business beyond the beginner and babysitter thing that dominates the business now. If the group is unhappy with the program, they can easily go back to the ski school manager have changes made. In any event, groups create a better environment for learning than the typical private lesson, which often ends up just being an instructor fishing for a tip by telling you how great you are.

BK
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
If you don't have good control of your indide ski you have a balance problem. Try picking it up, and try pulling it back under you. If you can't pick it up, you definitely have a balance problem.
Before you can learn to ski moguls, you need good balance, and strong flexion and extension for pressiure managemant. Once you have those skills, it's easy to learn the tactics you need for moguls.
Between private lessons and a multi day group program, I'll take the group every time. Private lessons are a hit or miss deal, unless you know the instructor. My experience has been that when ski schools market multi day clinics, they generally choose instructors pretty caerfully based on what the program goals are. Everyone involved is looking develop a new area of business beyond the beginner and babysitter thing that dominates the business now. If the group is unhappy with the program, they can easily go back to the ski school manager have changes made. In any event, groups create a better environment for learning than the typical private lesson, which often ends up just being an instructor fishing for a tip by telling you how great you are.

BK

I guess I should be more spefic to what it's doing... It dosn't get out from under me, I always maintain a parallel stance. I feel that I get more "chatter" from my inside ski usually. In addition I feel that on steeper runs I'm not innitiating the turn with my inside ski, I'm using the hoop method more than innitiating the turn with my inside ski... It could be balance...this is why I want the lessons.

Thanks for ur input.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity View Post
I guess I should be more spefic to what it's doing... It dosn't get out from under me, I always maintain a parallel stance. I feel that I get more "chatter" from my inside ski usually. In addition I feel that on steeper runs I'm not innitiating the turn with my inside ski, I'm using the hoop method more than innitiating the turn with my inside ski... It could be balance...this is why I want the lessons.

Thanks for ur input.
Chances are that if you are having similar issues in steeps and bumps that seem to be particularly related to confidence and turn initiation, it sounds like you are letting the terrain scare you at least a little. Basically, what is happening is the same thing that happens to beginners when then are learning turns and are uncertain or their own abilities and they hang their inside foot back (as well as lean back). In bumps and steeps when you get an unweighted inside ski or have to rely on hop turns, balance and confidence are typically the biggest culprits. Having new tactical approaches should allow you to feel more comfortable in how to ski the more challenging terrain without as many or as defined mental stumbling blocks.

Now, your initial question about lessons. Unless you know who you are working with, typically I would say go for the group lesson. For the price, you can normally get many group lessons for the price of one private (especially if they offer a bumps/steeps specific group lesson). From their, you can figure out who you liked working with the most and who's teaching style matched well with your learning style and from their you can take private lessons that you will be certain will be worth the money.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity View Post
I feel that I get more "chatter" from my inside ski usually.
Chatter on the inside ski only is pretty unusual, or maybe I'm confused by your description. Chatter is generally caused by over pressuring the ski, so maybe you have a lateral balance issue. Maybe there's a fore-aft balance issue as well. But the advice remains the same. Try picking up the inside ski, try pulling the inside foot back, try advancing the outside foot. Watch what happens. If it doesn't work, stop doing it.
I've been working with a bunch of guys who let their skis chatter too much. They all seem to think that the solution to every ski problem is more edging. I make them ski round turns on perfectly flat skis. Once they are comfortable with that, they can add back a little bit of edge. The goal is to teach them a soft, progressive edge engagement that never overpowers the ski.

BK
post #13 of 17
My choice would be the moguls bumps and steeps seminar. You are going to get instructors that know moguls bumps and steeps and you get personal attention and you can also learn when others are getting critiques.
post #14 of 17
I would check out Hunter's moguls and more workshop. You will get a solid mogul instructor.

From hunter's website:

Moguls and More - (Skiers age 19 and over)
Dates: #1: Feb. 3 & 4 (weekend), #2: Mar. 3 & 4 (weekend)
Open to skiers who are comfortable on blue square terrain or better, this workshop is designed to enhance your bump skills through a variety of drills that enhance short turns and mogul skiing ability. Learn how to pick the best line, and use different tactics to navigate even the toughest of bump fields. All workshops meet in Goldye's of the Learning Center and run from 8am-4pm.
  • 1 day without lift tickets: $105
  • 2 days without lift tickets: $210
post #15 of 17
extremity,

A bump clinic sounds great. For specific issues as you describe, a private lesson would be your best bet. So, my answer is do both. Do the private lesson first for 2 hours or so. That way you would have time and milage on any technique adjustments before the bump clinic. I teach a few miles away from Hunter if you are interested in doing a private lesson with me at Windham Mountain.

RW
post #16 of 17
The one hour private is the biggest rip off in skiing. Do not take one. 3 hours is great with a private instructor. If you are going this route then let me make a suggestion. Forget about Hunter for this. Go to Belleayre and ask for Doug Pierini. He is a National D-team member. You can't do better than that unless of course you go out to CO and ski with Harald. :
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
If you can afford a two or three hour private then do it.
If you are trying to get the most value for your $$ then do a group lesson on a weekday (good chance it will wind up being a private). Lessons at the higher levels have few students and the small group size and longer time on snow will give you the most return on your investment. One hour wonders are OK for a quick tune up or a quick launch to the next lower level but at the higher end Steeps, Deeps, and Bumps time and mileage are as important as input.
Sometimes, you can get a private when buying a group lesson. Hardly anyone does a level 7/8 lesson (which is the bump/steep level) by going to the regular lineup. Years ago, as a season passholder at Hunter, I acquired some free group lesson tickets. I went to see if some instructor friends needed them, and they advised me to use them myself and told me how. I picked one of the busiest weekend days of the season, walked up to lineup and stood at the 7/8 sign. I was the only one there, and most of the higher level instructors knew me, and after finding out what I was doing there, started jockeying to get my lesson. Finally, the line-up supervisor, a PSIA level 3 and sometime ski companion, came over and asked if I'd mind if he taught my lesson. We spent the next hour and a half, cutting lines, skiing hard, and squeezing some instruction in.
I also think those weekend bump clinics that MANCES00 suggested seem pretty good. There's some good bump ski instructors at Hunter, and I believe they also use some of the freestyle team coaches, as well as borrow some outside talent to coach at them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Group Lesson or Private Lesson (which do I choose)