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is Slush crud? if so I don't like it. - Page 2

post #31 of 43
I <3 slush. it awesome stuff to ski. fat long skis and aggressive technique works best.

and does it really matter what we call the stuff on the slope its frozen, its there, ski it.
post #32 of 43
I`m glad you realize that its not the skis,its the skier.I ski at Summit/Bear in slush and love it.If there is any snow that makes you look good its that.I`m on p60`s BTW.Work on your teqnique and learn to embrace the constantly changing conditions we are blessed with.Variety is the spice of life Bro.Sounds like you are applying to much tip pressure when going straight.Try to stay nuetral/balanced on your skis.That should help your hooking problem.
post #33 of 43
WAX! and FAT skis! slush is easy with the right wax. why people don't tune enough needs to be called-out. Daily buff jobs keep it simple. It's the yearly tunes that are a severe pain in the ass, and the skis suck.

After skiing my gotama for 2 years, I discovered a new thrill last spring... waist-deep slush carving on steep pitches.
post #34 of 43
I love slush ...


...crud...not so much (but it's still better than not skiing). Oh, and I prefer a long and burly mid-fat in the slush (I find fatties slide out too much).
post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I skipped the mountain this past weekend and plan to go next weekend. I'm going to readup on waxing my skis so I can get 'em done before sundays ski trip.
post #36 of 43

Roll'm & Squirt

More important than waxing is rilling (structuring) your bases. A smooth polished bottomed ski will create suction in wet snow. If you lightly groove your bases from tip to tail after waxing and buffing it will allow the water to flow along the bottom of the ski and reduce the sticky feeling.

Slush is some of the most fun stuff to ski. Like BushwakerinPA says, you need to be agressive. With a little speed the slush will push up under your ski during the turn and form a perfect platform at whatever angle you choose. If you hit it hard you can "roller skate" down the slope on a continuous smooth surface you create as you go, and stop on a dime when desired. Steep bumps become docile when they slush up. Fat skis make it easier but are not required unless the snow is approaching the rotten stage.

It takes some practice, but slush can be much easier to ski than hard snow. Keep your knees and skis together, stay low, then roll'm and squirt.
post #37 of 43
I would also like to add that sometime fat skis can be to much and end up sticking more cause of the surface area. Mid fats then become your friend.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I would also like to add that sometime fat skis can be to much and end up sticking more cause of the surface area. Mid fats then become your friend.
YES! surface area sucks when it's dry and sticky, lacking a proper tune. Perhaps wax/structure is even more important the fatter you go.
post #39 of 43
Bushwacker and Mudfoot could teach a late spring slush-fest clinic. I personally enjoy the semi water skiing experience.
post #40 of 43

Surf the Rockies!

Like powder, slush takes some time to learn to ski, but most people don't get that many chances. It will also kick your ass in a hurry if you make a mistake and is not as forgiving as powder, so it is even more important to keep your skis together. When it gets deep and heavy you need to stay low and push both skis into the snow. Slush favors the heavier skier.

Living in the southwest I get to enjoy a long season of "spring" skiing when the snow melts and refreezes every day, so I get lots of practice. We laugh at the spring tourists who go out first thing in the morning and ski "frozen doorknobs" for three hours and then leave the mountain just when it is starting to get good around noon or 1:00 and miss the great "corn snow." Many skiers end their season right when the slush season starts in the Spring. The only danger is that once the hill starts its melt freeze cycle you may get a cold snap without snow, and then you have an ugly icey knobby monster until it snows or warms again. That happened to me once at Jackson Hole when I arrived the day after a two week sunny streach.

It also takes some thinking to hit the good stuff because different aspects of the mountain soften up at different times. In late March or April at a place like Snowbird you can spend almost the entire day skiing ice or soft slush depending on how you follow the sun. Watch where the locals are skiing. The high altitude sun works fast, so timing is everything.

In the backcountry some people actually prefer slush to powder. You can walk up the frozen north slope with skis on your back and then ski the sweet corn on the sunny south side. There is nothing like skiing the super steeps when it is perfectly hard and smooth with just the top 3 inches lightly toasted to velvety softness.

Try a little surfing this year and you just may find that it becomes one of your favorite conditions.
post #41 of 43

Is slush crud ?

No. Slush conditions is what us eastern skiers were bitching about two weeks ago, and what we refer to now as "the good old days"

Wounded Warrior
post #42 of 43
I'm with mudfoot on this (your name seems suggestive here!). I really like slush too, and we get it rather often over here in Europe. I love the way it makes a platform for your turn. Mind you, there is a certain stage of really deep, wet slush off piste when it becomes almost unskiable. You have to either work really, really hard or lean right back so your points come up near the surface, and sort of bounce them from side to side, and on less steep slopes the latter is the only way not to just stop.
I remember once at Argentierre (Chamonix valley) on a hot spring day in the steep Lavancher back bowl taking the whole thing straight and hardly going above a beginner's speed. But that was extreme.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
It also takes some thinking to hit the good stuff because different aspects of the mountain soften up at different times.
Follow the sun.
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