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World's Longest Board

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Neighborhood friend.......


Central Oregon man's 'Big Kahuna' snowboard might be the longest in the world
By Mark Morical / The Bulletin
Published: December 25. 2006 5:00AM PST
The "Big Kahuna" is propped up against a wall inside Mt. Bachelor's Sunrise Lodge.
Every skier or snowboarder who walks by stares up in wonder at the towering innovation - all 8 feet 3¤ inches of it.
"Is it a ski or a snowboard?" one young boy asks.
The Big Kahuna is most definitely a snowboard. And at 252 centimeters, it's quite possibly the longest snowboard in the world.
Doug Dryer of Bend carves his unique board down the freshly groomed slope near the Sunrise chairlift. It's obvious he is riding a snowboard, but his carving motion down the mountain is a rarely seen art form: He digs the edge of his board deep into the snow, leaning so that his body is parallel to the slope and his face barely a foot from the corduroy lines.
Dryer places his hand on the slope, "caressing the snow," as he reaches nearly 40 mph and his board cuts a deep track, spraying snow several feet in the air.
"It's the ultimate turn," Dryer says. "You're up close and personal with the snow."
Alpine snowboarding
* Doug Dryer of Bend, who rides what might be the longest snowboard in the world, is trying to promote the fading sport of alpine snowboarding.
* In alpine snowboarding, the focus is on speed and carving the perfect turn. For more information, log on to www.bomberonline.com or call Dryer at 385-8304.
Dryer's form of snowboarding is basically alpine, in which riders wear hard boots with their feet pointed more forward on the board than freestyle boarders.
But Dryer tries to get his body closer to the slope than most alpine snowboarding racers. He calls his form of riding "extreme carving."
"Doug's a very good rider," says Mike Tinkler, who custom built the Big Kahuna for Dryer. "He tips it over pretty radical. A lot of pros (racers) don't do that because they need to get to the next gate."
Tinkler and Dryer are part of an alpine snowboarding community that has grown smaller and smaller as freestyle and powder riding have come to rule the snowboarding world.
At his west Bend home, Dryer, a woodworker who has lived in Central Oregon for about four years, has a collection of nearly 30 boards, many of which he uses to help alpine boarders get started at Mount Bachelor.
Equipment for alpine snowboarding is now difficult to find, because most manufacturers no longer make it. Many alpine riders must go to custom-board makers, like Tinkler.
Last year, Dryer ordered a board from Tinkler that was 201 centimeters long. Then he upgraded to a 222-centimeter board.
But that just wasn't long enough for Dryer, and next came the Big Kahuna, which Dryer rode for the first time this month.
"It rockets you into the next turn," Dryer says. "Most people do not ride a board longer than 200 centimeters. With length comes more speed. Everything is intensified."
And as far as Dryer and Tinkler know, the Big Kahuna could be the longest snowboard in the world. They posed that question in forums on several alpine snowboarding Web sites and have heard from no one who knows of a longer board.
"We have not found anyone who's built anything longer," Tinkler says. "Our only competition would be a powder board. The longest powder board we heard of was 8 feet long."
Tinkler, who lives in The Dalles, was a competitive surfer and windsurfer in Hawaii. He's been in the alpine snowboarding industry since the early 1990s and has worked with World Cup racers.
Tinkler needed about three months to build the Big Kahuna, which he says would cost about $3,000 retail. The board includes a wooden core of poplar and white ash with a high-grade aluminum as the laminated top plate. Tinkler also implemented his "Snow Stix," a flex adjustment system that allows riders to alter the stiffness of the board, depending on how aggressively they want to ride.
"I crank them," says Dryer, who likes to ride as aggressively as possible.
The Big Kahuna also features a split tail, which provides shock absorption for smoother riding.
The board can often be mistaken for a ski because of its long, narrow design: 18.3 centimeters wide at its slimmest point, at the center - or waist - of the board. Conventional boards are 25 centimeters or wider at the waist.
The narrow design allows for quicker turning from one edge of the board to the other.
Dryer uses step-in bindings, with his feet at a 65-degree angle forward. He focuses on keeping his hips straight forward down the mountain, more so than most freestyle boarders.
Because Dryer likes to run his hand and arm along the snow when riding, he says he goes through gloves and jackets rather quickly. He reinforces the palm of his right glove with black silicone.
The best terrain for the Big Kahuna is a wide, freshly groomed slope, Dryer says. He can ride it on two to three inches of new snow, but any more than that and riding the big board becomes dangerous.
"If there's a pocket of soft snow, the nose will penetrate a soft spot and just dig in and stop - and you keep going," Dryer says.
He notes that Bachelor's Thunderbird run near the Pine Marten chairlift and Beverly Hills run near the Summit chairlift are some of the best slopes on which to ride the Big Kahuna. But he says he can take it on most places at Mount Bachelor, just not on a run that's too narrow - and definitely not in the trees.
And with the speeds Dryer reaches on the board, he is ever cognizant of other snowriders.
"It's about yielding and being real smart," Dryer explains. "You pick and choose your line. If it (the slope/run ahead) is cluttered, I stop and wait. I never want to scare a beginner. It would scare the living daylights out of them."
On the slopes, skiers and snowboarders don't have much time to catch a glimpse of Dryer as he rips down the mountain. But inside the lodge and on a chairlift, there is no shortage of curiosity and dropped jaws.
"I get questions a lot: 'Is that real? Is that legal?' " Dryer says. "Someone at West Village Lodge thought it was a decoration. The feedback is just hilarious."
But the sport is extremely serious. It takes concentration and commitment when flying down the slope at such high speeds. Crashes can be catastrophic.
"There's no holding back in this sport," Dryer says. "If you get timid, you'll be in trouble. You have to make very quick edge changes between turns or else you'll be in the sidelines. Getting on edge, you need to completely tip the board - all or nothing."
post #2 of 35
The longest board is 100 meters long and carries 100 skiers. Also piloted by a Mt. Bachelor skier:

http://www.cccski.com/main.asp?cmd=doc&ID=4210&lan=0
post #3 of 35
Slider,

Thanks for posting this!

It's interesting, among other things, that the "longboard movement" still exists in some corners of the alpine world. Off of some internet forums it seems dead in most corners of the ski world and freeride and freestyle snowboards have for the most part gotten shorter over the years; the move to PGS and away from GS and SG has also effectively shortened typical race snowboards too.

With snowboarding still a young and very fashion-driven sport, it'll be interesting to see whether our "longboarders" -- including the Tanker 200 folks (a 200cm freeride board), etc. -- stay as a niche, or not.
post #4 of 35
I have been assured by an ex-Burton Racer that Burton Snowboards R&D made longer race boards than this, in the 1980s.
Hem
post #5 of 35
The longer race boards, I'm further assured, had too high a frictive coefficient past a certain LxW.
This from my current SSD
Hem
post #6 of 35
Anybody can say that "We did R & D on longer boards"

This thing rides.
post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills View Post
Anybody can say that "We did R & D on longer boards"

This thing rides.

The video doesn't really help the case that the length is practical imo, though.
post #8 of 35
whether or not a board is used for R&D or retail, the worl'd longest board is, in fact, the world's longest board.
I'll ask my SSD if Burton racers ran longer lengths in actual competition.
He seemed to imply that they did.
Best, Hem
post #9 of 35
Bu**shi* - Burton never made any raceboards. It was Oldenbürg (Upper Austria - now insolvent) who build them for burton. They had an exclusive deal for more than 20 years. Burton Teamriders like Sigi Grabner were however in contact with Oldenbürg on the development of boards

The longest board to my memory which was once featured on bol was a I think 280cm snowboard made for Ross Powers used on the speed slope of LaGrave (197km/h or something as ultimate Speed for that board).
post #10 of 35
"Bu**shi* - Burton never made any raceboards. It was Oldenbürg (Upper Austria - now insolvent) who build them for burton. They had an exclusive deal for more than 20 years. Burton Teamriders like Sigi Grabner were however in contact with Oldenbürg on the development of boards"

This, I am assured, is not true. You're referring to the PJs and some retail Safaris, while the Team Boards were, in fact, manufactured in Manchester, directly under the eye of competitiors such as Andy "Dog" Coughlin, et al.
This is from my SSD, whom raced for Burton, himself, in the 1980s. There were two different factories and two distinctly different teams for a time.
Should you wish to argue this with an ex-burton racer, I'll pass along your info, if you'd like.

Hem
post #11 of 35
well I'm referring to for sure the Burton Speed, The R17, The Ultra Primes and the Primes and all other burton race boards "made in Austria". At least in the 90s the burton team boards were made at Oldenbürg too, I've seen a many racers EC/FIS and non FIS riders on non-official burton raceboards from Oldenbürg.
The Freestyle cap boards were never made at Oldenbürg. For freestyle sandwich boards I assume some were made at Oldenbürg but not many.
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver View Post
well I'm referring to for sure the Burton Speed, The R17, The Ultra Primes and the Primes and all other burton race boards "made in Austria". At least in the 90s the burton team boards were made at Oldenbürg too, I've seen a many racers EC/FIS and non FIS riders on non-official burton raceboards from Oldenbürg.
The Freestyle cap boards were never made at Oldenbürg. For freestyle sandwich boards I assume some were made at Oldenbürg but not many.
Mr. Carver: This revised viewpoint doesn't quite square with your initial claim of "Bu**shi* - Burton never made any raceboards."
Burton race snowboards, I am assured, were first made in Manchester, Vermont, including the original "Safari" race models, which were ridden and raced by Andy Coughlin, Scott Palmer, Tara Eberhard, and even Craig Kelly.
Perhaps what you meant to say was: "Most Burton race boards of the 1990s were manufactured in Austria, while the earlier iterations, including the 225cm Comp III race prototypes, were manufactured in America."

In either event, Burton did, indeed, manufacture race Snowboards.
My SSD will be in Kaprun later this month, perhaps the two of you might enjoy some lighthearted laugh sover some beer to discuss this fact.

Gruss Gott,
Hem
post #13 of 35
Well for me that were more sort of alpine boards, not raceboards. But you're right. Called up some lads that confirmed the vermont factory.
post #14 of 35
...best to call friends first, before stating that one someone else posts is "bull***t".
This brand of conduct can only serve as divisive in a community such as ours of like interest...I am convinced that you are an excellent individual whose viewpoints warrant great respect, and ask only the same.
I spoke to my SSD, and he'd stated that he would be happy to visit with you in the south, when he'll be in Kaprun and, likely, Samnuan, next month.

You would have many laughs and good runs, as he's an ex worldcup racer and an incorrigible prankster

Cheers,
and all my sincere best-
(how's the snow down there?)
Hem, Carpathian Mtn.s
post #15 of 35
Snow - What Snow. Hopefully it comes next week (its the first time since 2 month that cold weather is predicted). Prob is that I live in Vienna - 6-7hrs away from tirol/Voralberg. I'll probabely join the Extremecarving Session in Zinal (CH) and then run out of money to do many more trips to the west as I've got a season pass for the east and we've got races on pretty much every weekend in Feb.

Otherwise I'ld have loved to go there.
post #16 of 35
As you may have noticed, I have no AM lessons, today.
We've snow in the higher resorts (see attached photo of one of my students, on Friday, here in the "hills of the vampire"), I'm taking a personal day, regardless, as work had been nonstop to this point.
We should be getting a good dump this week, and, should you still be dry down there, feel free to visit us. I'm sure we can help with free accomodation, and, if you teach, classes to defray costs.
Best,
Hem
525x525px-LL-vbattach1148.jpg
post #17 of 35
Hem- Nice picture. A smiling student and a great background, sweet.
post #18 of 35
Thanks, Schnee- I love the smell of the Carpathians at sunset...
...Smells like.....Vampires...

Cheers,
Hem
post #19 of 35
I'm dying to try that board of Doug's. He's an awesome rider and a great carver.

I have to claim BS on Burton making anything longer than 2M, but I suppose I could be wrong.

Everything I've heard about those Tinkler's has been great. I routinely ride a 210cm Custom Donek SG board. It is a blast to ride and very fun. There are some riders over on BomberOnline that ride long boards. My everyday rides are a 171 and a 180, although I demoed a Prior WCR 187 this weekend that has me considering stepping up to one of their Metal boards.

I need to get my ass up to Bachelor and talk Doug into letting me try out one of his big Tinklers (he also has a 223).

I can't find the pic of Doug with his quiver. Its about 50 boards - pretty cool.

Here's one of him riding a fairly long F2 board wearing snowboard hardboots. I guess it was a low snow winter.

post #20 of 35
Why do you feel the need to claim "BS" on Burton raceboards which exceeded 200cm?
My SSD raced for/on them, as did many other fine riders, such as those whose names I'd cited.
What do you base your claim on?
This is an odd tack, for sure.
I have seen 210 cm Burton race snowboards, myself.
I simply cannot understand the habitually recurrent need which some people exhibit, to state that the claim of another is "BS".

Please let's find a more positive way to discuss these things.
When one criticises something of which one is ignorant, one's only criticising his/her own ignorance.

Cheers,
Hem
post #21 of 35
Hem,

It amazes me how two diametrically opposed viewpoints can sometimes both be "right" at the same time. Sometimes it boils down to semantics or "conditions". Then again, sometimes someone who "knows" they are right can also innocently be dead wrong. For purposes of moderation, I'll accept a definition of "calling BS" as equal to saying "you're wrong". It's not the politest way of doing it, but I've heard it used that way among friends so I've chosen to take it that way until proven otherwise.

Who knows, the explanation behind all this might be interesting, or maybe even funny, or even better ... worth a beer. Among friends, such things are usually settled with a wager.
post #22 of 35
It strikes no one else as odd that a 250cm board is being used to make GS turns?

I'm trying to think how I would react if I saw someone on a pair of 250cm skis trying to ski like the woman in the EC skiing thread that was on here a few weeks back. Does not compute imo.
post #23 of 35
I think this board could be the world longest snowboard. Ridden at the World Championships in Arosa.
I couldn't find any pictures of people riding it though but it was after the PSL ceremony by the Schoch Brothers fanclub
525x525px-LL-vbattach1159.jpg
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
......... Among friends, such things are usually settled with a wager.
Or dueling pistols.
post #25 of 35
Therusty:

When I worked at Sugar Loaf, I was astonished by the length of many boards, manufactured by many brands, which the Alpine Snowboarders of the Carrabassett Valley Academy leaned against the lodge during their lunch breaks.

I was further astonished at the commonly-in-excess-of-200 cm length of the boards, again of widespread manufacture, which the competitors at the US Open at Stratton, VT., raced upon.

That you would describe someone stating "BS", to one who has both seen boards of such length, and whom works for a retired Snowboard racer who assures the veracity of claims of Burton Snowboards (amongst others) which well exceeded 200 cm in length, as being "right", is a tad askew.

Perhaps you meant to state this differently.

You have my sincerest wishes for abundant snowfall, post-haste.
Cheers, Hem
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
The longest board is 100 meters long and carries 100 skiers. Also piloted by a Mt. Bachelor skier:

http://www.cccski.com/main.asp?cmd=doc&ID=4210&lan=0
Those would be skis
post #27 of 35
Oh BTW - How long are Tandem Snowboards?
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemingway View Post
That you would describe someone stating "BS", to one who has both seen boards of such length, and whom works for a retired Snowboard racer who assures the veracity of claims of Burton Snowboards (amongst others) which well exceeded 200 cm in length, as being "right", is a tad askew.

Perhaps you meant to state this differently.
Hem,

I was speaking in general in attempt to keep the peace. Speaking more specifically, but still hypothetically, I can see how one person could honestly believe how Burton made such boards after seeing such boards in person and how another person could equally believe "made" is not true because a different factory actually produced the boards. Just because a top sheet says a name does not necessarily mean the name actually made it. Who knows, maybe some French guy named Booortawnnnnnne (phonetic spelling) made long boards until Burton shut him down? I guess my point is that some people still believe the Earth is flat. No amount of arguing is ever going to convince them, so it's better to just let them be. The points have been made. Knowledgeable people watching the discussion can come to their own conclusions. In my mind, it's not hard to figure out a close enough approximation to what really happened for it not to matter who's "right" or who's "wrong".

Now if I can only take my own advice in the rebound thread, I'll be in good shape.
post #29 of 35
Again: Burton, Manchester, Vermont, United States Of America, Down Hill Snowboards in length excess of 200 cm, made under the eye of Andy Coughlin, et al.
My SSD, who is extremely (to a brutal fault) honest, used to pick up his DH Burton Snowboards at the Manchester factory in 1988.

Cheers,
Hem
post #30 of 35
Well my Prime was made in Austria, so I don't know...

Haha, just kidding. I suppose like most companies, Burton rolled their own before outsourcing. When I bought my first Burton, a M6, it was made in Austria, but most Burtons were still being built in Vermont at that time. What I've gathered from this 'discussion' is that all the alpine boards were produced in Europe by the time my Prime was made. Does Burton still make alpine boards for the European market? I know they don't market any here in USA. Do the freestyle boards still come from Vermont?
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