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Mouthpieces?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone have one custom-made for skiing? Benefits??
post #2 of 16
I never thought of using one for skiing but I used to use one for working out. I used to bite down so hard while lifting that I took precaution and got one of those heat and mold-at-home kits, worked well, just a bit of a messy PITA especially when your buddy tries to talk to you and you have to spit out this saliva covered piece of rubber...not a pretty sight.
post #3 of 16
My girls both have them from their orthodontist (yes, I have two in braces! : ) because of the looseness of the teeth generated by the orthodontia. If they were to take the wrong kind of fall without them, they could lose their teeth. It's less an issue with those who aren't having dental work done, but we did see a skier lose two teeth during the ESA at Snowbird last year... : IIRC, he hit his mouth with his pole grip.
post #4 of 16
I have a home molded one that I use for slalom when I'm too lazy to switch helmets. Or on bigger drops. I've had my knee slam into my with my chin before; not cool.
post #5 of 16
I saw a few skiers using them in Whistler/Blackcomb last January... generally, these people were hucking off any cliff band they could find. I rode the Excalibur gondola up with a couple of mouth guard equipped guys who were getting in some practice before heading down to Utah for a photo shoot. One even had a titanium case for his iPod that cost twice as much as the iPod itself.
post #6 of 16
There have been studies that either showed or claimed to show that mouthguards reduce the chances of suffering a concussion.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u View Post
There have been studies that either showed or claimed to show that mouthguards reduce the chances of suffering a concussion.
Interesting!!
post #8 of 16
I keep one in my jacket and put it in for anything over 20-30 ft
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
So is there any benefit to a "regular skiier type" or just for hucking, etc?
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenscats5 View Post
So is there any benefit to a "regular skiier type" or just for hucking, etc?
ya its extra protection, but not worth the hassle for low risk skiing
post #11 of 16
If you frequently ski on your lips, it could be beneficial.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
ya its extra protection, but not worth the hassle for low risk skiing
If you're not hucking, jumping, or doing moguls, what purpose would it serve?
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool View Post
If you're not hucking, jumping, or doing moguls, what purpose would it serve?
Depends on whether or not you fall, and, if you do, whether or not you hit your mouth on something...
post #14 of 16
For jumping and park skiing, if I were doing that, I think I'd wear one.

I don't wear one for regular skiing, but I wouldn't consider it crazy to do so. Normal skiing is "low risk" but it's not "no risk." At least two reasons: forward fall onto firm snow or being run into.

I don't know this (if it's even knowable), but I wouldn't be surprised if a mouthguard is as or more beneficial than a ski helmet, for ordinary skiers. Of course, the burden of wearing one is greater (mumbling and drooling like a punch-drunk boxer vs. looking sporty in a comfy lid). Actually, having worn one for football, a mouthguard isn't that bad if you don't have to talk (or people can understand what "dwenie-dree reh ah doo" means), or if you can put it in and out easily, which could be, um, awkward with ski gloves on.

There are rather dramatic, and I think pretty reliable, statistics on how beneficial mouthguards are for high school football players. The benefits for skiing aren't so dramatic, unless you're running into (or being run into by) people a dozen+ times a day (in which case, I think you have some serious problems that the mouthguard isn't going to cure). But the one collision or fall that hurts you can still happen.
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
For jumping and park skiing, if I were doing that, I think I'd wear one.

I don't wear one for regular skiing, but I wouldn't consider it crazy to do so. Normal skiing is "low risk" but it's not "no risk." At least two reasons: forward fall onto firm snow or being run into.

I don't know this (if it's even knowable), but I wouldn't be surprised if a mouthguard is as or more beneficial than a ski helmet, for ordinary skiers. Of course, the burden of wearing one is greater (mumbling and drooling like a punch-drunk boxer vs. looking sporty in a comfy lid). Actually, having worn one for football, a mouthguard isn't that bad if you don't have to talk (or people can understand what "dwenie-dree reh ah doo" means), or if you can put it in and out easily, which could be, um, awkward with ski gloves on.

There are rather dramatic, and I think pretty reliable, statistics on how beneficial mouthguards are for high school football players. The benefits for skiing aren't so dramatic, unless you're running into (or being run into by) people a dozen+ times a day (in which case, I think you have some serious problems that the mouthguard isn't going to cure). But the one collision or fall that hurts you can still happen.
Thanks!
post #16 of 16
actually, as it was mentioned before, mouthgaurds DO prevent many concussions because a lot of concussions are not generated by a direct impact to the head, but by the teeth hitting together and the shock traveling up and into the skull. This is also why mouthgaurds are recommended/required at water ramps, freestyle clinics, and by many backcountry/freeskiing competitions.
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