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Brilliant Skiing: Great Ski Book!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just reread Brilliant Skiing by weems, and I have to say it really is a very good book. I unfortunately only have the downloaded-and-printed-on-my-own-paper version which is a bit awkward but...

First off the Sports Diamond concept is very good and I believe can be a great help to anyone who incorporates it.

In addition there are a lot of tips that are great. It's not really a "how to" book, but his master pointers and other pointers work REALLY well for me, I think the more you understand skiing the more these things are incredibly helpful.

So what ever level you are I think it has a lot to offer, and it really is unique in the annals of ski book writing (and I know I have a lot of them!)

(btw I am not affiliated in any way, nor have I ever met weems - although I'd like to )
post #2 of 19
BTW, participants at 2006-07 EpicSki Academy events receive a copy of Weems's book and personally hear the author explain his concepts. You might say Weems is the Socrates of our Academy.
post #3 of 19
There is also a thread over in the Technique forum for discussion of the Sports Diamond.
post #4 of 19
Gotta love Weems!
He is an inspiration!
Rob, Fox and I were discussing how Weems and Jeb boyd left us in awe when they hit the moguls together.

If you witnessed it, you couldn't help but watch them, jaw dropped, saying WOW!, Just WOW!
post #5 of 19
Where can you get the book?
post #6 of 19
Matt, if you click on the Partners tab at the top of any forum page, Weems is an Epicski Sponsor and his link to Brilliant Skiing is there.
post #7 of 19
I read it. I thought that there was some good advice in it but a lot of it seemed pretty hoakey, like the sports diamond.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Matt, if you click on the Partners tab at the top of any forum page, Weems is an Epicski Sponsor and his link to Brilliant Skiing is there.
Thanks, I will check it out.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
I read it. I thought that there was some good advice in it but a lot of it seemed pretty hoakey, like the sports diamond.
I don't find the Sports Diamond to be hokey at all. I guess your hoke threshold is very low.
post #10 of 19
I have to admit Iwas a little weary of this book after 4 chapters but then I got into chapter 5 the pointers and it all came together. Great info. By far my favorite was:

"Ski nonstop runs, at least four every day, or eight if your ski area is small. If you’re fit,
there is no reason to ever stop skiing until you get to the bottom of a lift—unless, maybe,
you’re waiting for your boyfriend. Most people, however, ski trails in sections demar-
cated by changes of pitch or turns in the trail. This kills the rhythm and character of the
mountain and blocks you from really understanding it. As the saying goes, shut up
and ski! Nonstops are a great example of how changing your idea in one corner
(e.g., Purpose) leverages results in the other three: Touch (developing a real feel
for the mountain), Will (the courage to push through a little fatigue and take on
the whole hill), and Power (through uninterrupted skiing, your technique
always improves). So, yeah ... nonstops. "
post #11 of 19
It's pretty hokey and makes no sense. Unless you are trying to power your way through a situation and it isn't working so then you might redefine your purpose to fit the current situation . Feel your way and define the textures you can sense and use your commitment to finding a solution that helps you solve the puzzle of what confronts you.
This stuff you can use to cross the street or fly to the moon. When you next find something that perplexes, confronts or seems to block your progress use another path to reveal the possibilities you might be overlooking.
Hokey? Maybe just gibberish from a whitebeard on gay skis ?Or maybe not? Let's use Power, Touch , Purpose and Will and find this out for ourselves.
post #12 of 19
It's all hocus pocus. But it's MY hocus pocus so I gotta live with it.

Actually, it's also
  • a way to frame the decision-making process
  • a road map
  • a lens
  • a self-coaching system
  • a check list
  • a model
  • a mindset
  • an escape hatch
  • and, it's what I absolutely know I use on my best days in any sport.
But none of that matters. What matters is that you shift your focus when you get stuck somewhere rather than get bogged down in your favorite little trip. I believe the masters (master performers, master learners, and master teachers) know this at a deep and intuitive level. They recognize instinctively that there is more to the game than specific movements and techniques. The point of the diamond is to help develop conscious competence about how to find what YOU need at any moment and therefore unlock your own athletic genius.

I had some students today who had all the technique in the world, but they had no clue about the possibilities of various lines in the bumps. When they realized the importance of line (and of rhythm), I didn't have to tell them very much about technique. They made it up, because there purpose was clear and their great moves came right out of their rhythm.
post #13 of 19
Weems book and his diamond harken me back to the early days of my instructing career when the American Teaching Method was evolving into the American Teaching System and the focus was going away from teaching bits and pieces and towards more Holicstic Learning Concepts.

As I have begun to grasp the sports diamond, it is a total package that must be applied all at once with the recognition that focus, movement, or breakthough in one corner will effect the whole.
post #14 of 19
Thank you, Stache. This is, indeed, my intention.
post #15 of 19
The Diamond helps me keep it all in focus. It reminds me that I don't have to "get it" all today. And neither do my guests. It's enough to enjoy the day and sense movement and learning of any kind. Discovery. Change.

Things that are alive are constantly changing. Things that aren't constantly changing aren't alive. A pool that's not changing becomes stagnant and then dies.

The Diamond reminds us that there are many aspects to growth, and growing in one area while ignoring the rest leaves us stunted. We need to catch up with the others before we can move on.
post #16 of 19
To co-opt and warp a line from some movie I forget the title of: writing about skiing is like dancing about painting.
post #17 of 19
To be more accurate, when done well writing about skiing is like painting dancing.
post #18 of 19
Cool. Both comments are inspirations to write better. Second edition is in the mental works, and these are good visions to carry into it. Thanks, guys.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by asland View Post
I have to admit Iwas a little weary of this book after 4 chapters but then I got into chapter 5 the pointers and it all came together. Great info. By far my favorite was:

"Ski nonstop runs, at least four every day, or eight if your ski area is small. If you’re fit,
there is no reason to ever stop skiing until you get to the bottom of a lift—unless, maybe,
you’re waiting for your boyfriend. Most people, however, ski trails in sections demar-
cated by changes of pitch or turns in the trail. This kills the rhythm and character of the
mountain and blocks you from really understanding it. As the saying goes, shut up
and ski! Nonstops are a great example of how changing your idea in one corner
(e.g., Purpose) leverages results in the other three: Touch (developing a real feel
for the mountain), Will (the courage to push through a little fatigue and take on
the whole hill), and Power (through uninterrupted skiing, your technique
always improves). So, yeah ... nonstops. "
I read Brilliant Skiing a year ago, and totally forgot about this passage- at least I thought I did. Recently, this fundamental truth about skiing has become evident to me, which explains this thread:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=49180
It's interesting how information that may not be significant when you first read it has a way of dancing into your mind at a latter date.

This can explain why I am often uncomfortable in classes that stop evey five minutes. Sometimes, I am aware that I am moving incorrectly, but I need time to "play with the skill."
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