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5 year old ski/snowboard?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
We took our 5 and 8 year old skiing Mt Hood yesterday and they both did awsome! I was so surprised at how much just a couple of years of lessons has paid off. My daughter blew through the blue runs like nothing, my son was able to wedge his way on the blue runs, and did great on the green runs, no more bunny runs for these guys. So my question is: if my son wants to snowboard, how bad is for a 5 year old to transition to snowboarding if he's already been taught to ski? What the best age to teach someone to snowboard? I tried snowboarding once, and didn't take to it well. I've been skiing for over 30 years (not half as good as I should be, thats another thread) and I'm afraid I won't be able to help him snowboarding because I know nothing about it. I've even considered taking lessons again with him (powder, packed powder conditions only, not ice like I did the last time, ouch!!). Thanks, Dave
post #2 of 14
not an expert on this, but If it was my kid I'd make sure he was good at skiing first. I say wait untill he can handle blacks on skis, then once he's "an expert" have him move on to snowboarding.

The way I see it is why make him go to a different sport if he hasn't mastered this one yet ? unless he's bored with the sport i'd wait till he's really good first.

In reality, I personally would only encourage skiing on to him. If he wants to try snowboarding that he's "problem" hehehe.
post #3 of 14
Welcome to Epicski, grumpy. You might PM a "patroller" (moderator) to move your question to the snowboard instruction forum where it will receive more attention from experienced snowboard instructors.

Get him on a board as soon as possible, before that wedge becomes a deeply ingrained bad habit.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Welcome to Epicski, grumpy. You might PM a "patroller" (moderator) to move your question to the snowboard instruction forum where it will receive more attention from experienced snowboard instructors.
I'll do that, but I thought I would give a shot where skiers would see it as well, thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Get him on a board as soon as possible, before that wedge becomes a deeply ingrained bad habit.
My main concern...
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy_one View Post
I'll do that, but I thought I would give a shot where skiers would see it as well, thanks.


My main concern...

You are correct in your main concern is not to ingrain that wedge. To that end get him off the blues and stay on the easier trails until he can ski those doing all different types of turn shapes and with varying speeds with very little wedge or none at all. Sounds like he is being over terrianed trying to keep up with his older sister and that is just magnifying his habit.

There are all sorts of things you can do to challenge him on the greens that will help his skiing. Look for little jumps, especially where the groomers leave a ridge on the back side of a lift tower. Try 180 to 360 degree spins on the snow, 180 spins to skiing backwards. Little racer tuck runs tippping the skis on edge to let them carve turns. Hop turns can help to break the wedge. Make a game to see how far he can stand while moving on 1 ski usually in a traverse if traffic permits.

If he ingrains that wedge pushing motion and learns that is how to brake/ slow down, instead of turning up hill to slow and adjust his line he will figure that out on a baord also and just push and scrape instead of trying to work the board and use its side cut to its natural ability.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post
There are all sorts of things you can do to challenge him on the greens that will help his skiing. Look for little jumps, especially where the groomers leave a ridge on the back side of a lift tower. Try 180 to 360 degree spins on the snow, 180 spins to skiing backwards. Little racer tuck runs tippping the skis on edge to let them carve turns. Hop turns can help to break the wedge. Make a game to see how far he can stand while moving on 1 ski usually in a traverse if traffic permits.
WOW, you do know that he is only five, has had only a couple of lessons when he was 4, and been up a chair maybe only once before yesterday. I was proud as h*ll just to watch him go down the hill with what ever he had the ablity to do. 180 360 spins, skiing backwards???? That doesn't even compute.: : :
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Welcome to Epicski, grumpy. You might PM a "patroller" (moderator) to move your question to the snowboard instruction forum where it will receive more attention from experienced snowboard instructors.

Get him on a board as soon as possible, before that wedge becomes a deeply ingrained bad habit.
That wedge is just a hallway he goes through to get to parallel . Don't let it concern you. It has no bearing on his adjustment to snowboarding. We'e talking about young kids here and they will adapt much easier than we could. Let them take a lesson or three and decide for themselves.
My thought is you might have a couple snowboarders on your hands. It happened to me x3
post #8 of 14
I'm with Garry.

My six-year-olds wedged most of last year before developing parallel skills, and one of them even did the classic stem christie transition to parallel. They reverted a bit at the beginning of the season, but they're getting the hang of it again.

And nothing makes them love a hockey stop more than being able to spray a family member in the process.
post #9 of 14
Ski until he is 7 or 8. While some kids can snowboard at a younger age, with a lot of one on one instruction, they lack the Nero-muscular development needed for fine motor movements of the ankle needed in snowboarding.

If they are controlling their speed with a breaking wedge rather then turn shape, get off the blues. Find rolly terrain where they play with a bit of steepness without reverting to the death wedge.

Snowbowler is spot on about the spin, back wards skiing and other games. I have used that stuff with kids that age all the time. Don't spend a long stretch of time on it, just throw a little bit into each run. Even if they are not "successful" in the task, they are exploring different ways of moving on skis. Then one day out of the blue that will be spinning like a top.

Bodie and Benny stared out wedging, its OK
post #10 of 14
I wasn't suggesting the wedge would affect his adjustment to snowboarding, my idea is that he wouldn't be able to wedge on a snowboard.

My friend has a daughter that started snowboarding at an early age and another who chose skis. They both did fine, yes there was wedging and heel edge slides/stops. For a long time toeside turn was only used to enter the fall line and heelside to slow or stop (turn out of fall line). I guess that's the kids equivalent of wedging on a snowboard.

If he decides he wants to ski, the drills(games) Snobowler suggests shouldn't be too far down the road. I agree that he should stay on easier terrain.

Skiing is easier to learn, so if he isn't going to be on the hill very often, it might be the way to go.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy_one View Post
WOW, you do know that he is only five, has had only a couple of lessons when he was 4, and been up a chair maybe only once before yesterday. I was proud as h*ll just to watch him go down the hill with what ever he had the ablity to do. 180 360 spins, skiing backwards???? That doesn't even compute.: : :
Grumpy, You said your main concern was not to in grain the wedge, I gave you 1 reason that that might happen by taking him on blue trails. If he skis around on the greens that will be better for his very early development. Use the drills/games I talked about to have fun on that terrain while helping to dissolve the wedge. I think you have every right to be proud of what he has accomplised at 5. But now he can go much further with a little guidance. Would you like to ski bumps, steeps, terrain parks with him under control when he is about 8? Develop the skills now when it is easier to learn. I'm not trying to be mean to you.
post #12 of 14
Ski for longer for sure. Last year some of our friends came with us- 11, 8, & 7 year old boys. They had all been skiing before and the 11 year old had been snowboarding a couple of times before. The 8 & 7 year old were in snowboard school the whole time and when we finally decided to take them on a green run on the slopes they struggled big time. It took them forever to get down. The ski school their age and even younger were all over the mountain. Even the 11 year old struggled on some blues.

I think skiing is easier to learn at a younger age. They need to get those basics down before jumping to snowboarding.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post
Grumpy, You said your main concern was not to in grain the wedge,
You're correct, but what I meant was the transition from ski's to snowboard. It's been so long since I've had to deal with the wedge, I forgot how much of a bad habit it can be...:

Quote:
I gave you 1 reason that that might happen by taking him on blue trails. If he skis around on the greens that will be better for his very early development. Use the drills/games I talked about to have fun on that terrain while helping to dissolve the wedge. I think you have every right to be proud of what he has accomplised at 5. But now he can go much further with a little guidance. Would you like to ski bumps, steeps, terrain parks with him under control when he is about 8? Develop the skills now when it is easier to learn. I'm not trying to be mean to you.
I know your weren't trying to be mean, I just wasn't thinking outside the box :. But I do know about the tribulations of teaching your own family members, so I'll leave the lesson's to the pros. In the mean time, I'll hone down my own skills. I haven't skied much since marriage and kids (11 years!! time flys). Now that we are only 1 hour form the slopes vs 3 hours from our last house, we have a great opportunity to become a ski family. Thanks for all the input
post #14 of 14
Grumpy: You will have a great time skiing or boarding as a family, it has been some of the most enjoyable times on the slope for me to be out skiing with my 2 kids age 11 and 9. There is definately some time commitment involved in the younger years but keep at it because it pays huge dividends in the end. I keep instilling(bugging) my kids that when they get older and have careers and $$$$$ then they can take out their parents to ski. Ha Ha I'm sure they will have long forgotten that when the time comes around. Make some great turns!
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