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Old Rope Tow Video

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Here is an old Rope Tow Video back in the days when we skied on snow made by mother nature (not the stuff that comes out of a snow gun). I like the guy that hangs on, snaps the rope, and knocks everyone down on the rope tow. Takes a while to load. Be patient its worth it.
post #2 of 14
Excellent. That brings back lots of memories. Ropes were great at small areas because you could just keep doing laps.
post #3 of 14
LMAO!!!! I'm laughing outloud at work! Hilarious! Although, I DO remember those days!
post #4 of 14
Reminds me of my son and his first day skiing. After his lesson (he was a tiny seven year old), he wanted nothing to do with Mom & Dad; there was only the little boy and the big rope ... it became his whole focus, the only thing in his world.

He would grab the rope and get a face full and the nice lifte would pick him off and brush him off and up he would go, again and again.

Second day brought the same thing, a face of snow followed by those turns a bit bolder each time.

After lunch he walked out with us and just pointed toward the chair lift that serviced the blue run and said ...... "I'm ready to go up there" ...

One "artifact" that has been recently lost was my Marker Rope Gripper; an aluminium bar almost ice cream scoop type thing with a notch for the rope. Much easier on the arms. Rawhide mittens too, a tow could chew up conventional gloves in minutes.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

One "artifact" that has been recently lost was my Marker Rope Gripper; an aluminium bar almost ice cream scoop type thing with a notch for the rope. Much easier on the arms. Rawhide mittens too, a tow could chew up conventional gloves in minutes.

look familiar?

check out NZ. Nutcrackers, (just like walnut crackers, but bigger) attached via a small rope to a climbing harness that you wear. ropetows even have ski-in banks so you can approach the rope with speed. (honestly-- they go really fast and are hard to grab onto.

rope tows in america are for beginners. Rope tows in New Zealand are for experts only.
BTW... these tows access some ridiculous terrain.
post #6 of 14
That's it! My version was a ringer for that one .... but we sure didn't have a speed approach ramp .... you let the gloves slip till they gripped and then slid the bar on.

Fun on the way up was the "slalom" around the fallen bodies that got slung by the ruts.

post #7 of 14
I remember hanging on my harness while going up a 45 degree pitch in a non-lit canyon at about 20 mph seeing remnants of a distant flood light pearing its fingers over the rock above me, snow beating my face, my nutcracker sparking on the steel pullies, knowing that not leaning to the side to keep all my extremities from getting cut off would surely result in such. Tool blared over the speakers at 11pm and four beers weren't enough to promote resistance to the temptation of skiing unmanned ropes that started up with the push of a big yellow button. The whole place, maybe twenty of us, skied that rope in knee deep, invisible, pow fields back to the small light at the bottom of the rope. Nobody saw a thing in that storm that night. And we all ripped pow ripped and blind for about two hours.

if you readers ever venture to new zealand in an attempt to signify the lengends you hear, DO NOT miss the club fields!
post #8 of 14
Remember my rope tow days vividly. Holding on as hard as I could trying to get to the top before my arms would fail me and I'd have to leave go. . Shredded mittens . Before there was high speed, gortex, shaped skis, footbeds and great fitting ski boots there was skiing. Amazing!
post #9 of 14
I fondly remember my first ever downhill skiing experience. Spending 1/2 hour trying to get started on the tow .... many face plants (and much laughter from the lifties) later I finally got it right and up the hill I went. No one told me how to unload however, so I got to the top, let go of the rope .... and promptly started skiing backward down the tow line
post #10 of 14
I have only gone one-on-one with a rope tow once. It was on my first-ever day of skiing at Wisp in Maryland. Their bunny hill was serviced by a rope-tow. I'm amazed I didn't kill myself on that thing.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I have only gone one-on-one with a rope tow once. It was on my first-ever day of skiing at Wisp in Maryland. Their bunny hill was serviced by a rope-tow. I'm amazed I didn't kill myself on that thing.
Good point. Rope tows were not danger free. The ropes would sometimes twist in your hands. Many years ago I saw this girl with very long waist length hair get her hair caught in the twisting rope. By the time she got to the top where the operator had fallen a sleep, her hair was wound around the rope right up to her skull when she screamed and woke up the operator. The lift operator worked for about an hour unwinding her hair. He eventually untangled the hair ball with out having to cut anything. I don't think she was aware that the lift operator was sleeping at the controls, which BTW was a car frame, car motor, drive shaft, clutch, standard transmission, brakes, gas lever (cruise control), and wheels with no tires. No steering wheel was necessary but it had one anyway.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post
Remember my rope tow days vividly. Holding on as hard as I could trying to get to the top before my arms would fail me and I'd have to leave go. . Shredded mittens . Before there was high speed, gortex, shaped skis, footbeds and great fitting ski boots there was skiing. Amazing!
Don't they still have rope tows at your hill?

I spent my first season on a rope tow slowly acquiring the skills necessary to safely ski the runs served by the t-bar. (There was a test). I couldn't really lift the heavy rope by myself, if I was alone on the rope, I held it at about ankle height.
post #13 of 14
I remember when I was about 5 years old (I think my Mom has a movie of it) I was too small to reach the rope tow so my Dad would get his skis in the tracks and let the rope run through his hands while I quickly stepped over his outside ski and positioned my skis between his. I would lean back and hold onto his KNEES while he pulled us both up the rope tow. Fond memories!
post #14 of 14
We finally exchanged a "magic carpet" for the beginner tow rope at Boyne Mountain this season. Even though Boyne's rope tow was slow and easy, compared to the video and my memories from 60 years ago when I first met these tortureous devices, it still was a pain to teach and use.
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