EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Humour and Fun Stuff › The Japanese (ski) word list...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Japanese (ski) word list...

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'll try to keep this introduction short.

Inspired by "The ski word association" thread, and my own need to up my studying a notch, this is set up for those who care about how the Japanese refer to skiing. If you study Japanese, or just get a kick out of other languages, please feel free to add, respond and/or correct me as I'm just a student myself. I will take requests, however please don't turn me into an online dictionary. Also, please add your humor... that's the point afterall.

-------------------------------------------------------------
SNOW Each post will start with a single English word in bold.
YUKI Followed by the Japanese translation written in Romanji.
ゆき Followed by the Japanese written in Japanese.
雪 Followed by the kanji.

Yuki ga huru/furu. It's snowing. Followed by an example in use.

Yuuki = courage. Followed by another meaning or relation...
-------------------------------------------------------------

Rules about the phonetics... (sorry, but it must be said.)

Japanese is made up of three syllabaries;
Hiragana; ひらがな Note the curves. (one symbol / one syllable) Used to write Native Japanese words. Has 48+ phonetic symbols.
Katakana; カタカナ Note the sharp angles. (one symbol / one syllable) Used to write words borrowed from other languages. Has 48+ phonetic symbols different from Hiragana.
Kanji; 漢字 Chinese characters used in Japanese writing. Being able to read about 1,945 characters will consider you fluent and able to comprehend a newspaper. (Many highschool students in Japan are not yet fluent in Kanji. That learning curve never ends.) And to really piss off the foreigner, those characters often (if not usually) have more than one word/meaning/phonetic.

Romanji is used to help us english speakers read the language.
A couple of simple rules apply; (think spanish)
99% of Japanese phonetic sounds involve the combination of a constonant and a vowel. Vowels have only one sound. Accents are not to be worried about as the language is kind of steady/flat and each syllable has equal value.
A = is pronounced ah (caught)
E = is pronounced eh (bay)
I = is pronounced ee (street)
O = is pronounced oh (boat)
U = is pronounced oo (flute)

double vowels uu aa ee ii oo will be pronounced using a long pause.
example from above; YUKI is pronounced yookey
YUUKI is pronounced yooookey.

Okay, now that the boring yada-yada is over, let's go...
Again, please add your humor, insert your jokes, etc...
post #2 of 28
Ok, you've piqued my interest of ths language spoken often by visitors to Western coastal regions. In Seattle we have much influence and trade by Japanese culture.
How do you say ;

Chair lift
Let's go skiing
Snowboard
Skis
Powder snow

This language is so differant than our Euro born speech and type that the concepts are hard for us to get started in. I always wish I had studied Japanese or Chinese. It would be so relevant these days and the not so distant future
post #3 of 28
I am sukii-kichigai (sp?)
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito View Post
I am sukii-kichigai (sp?)
???
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
???
Ski crazy; ski nut
post #6 of 28
Speaking of Japanese, what is this category of ski gear called Demo that they only have in Japan? I was on the Head site and they have a bunch of cool gear exclusive to Japan called Demo.
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
Speaking of Japanese, what is this category of ski gear called Demo that they only have in Japan? I was on the Head site and they have a bunch of cool gear exclusive to Japan called Demo.
think psia demo-team style skiing. There are skis designed specifically for that style, just like every other style; bumps, pow, etc...
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
How do you say ;

Chair lift
Let's go skiing
Snowboard
Skis
Powder snow
Oofta.

many of these requests are actually borrowed into japanese.
Chair lift= Lifuto; リフト  so katakana is used to write it. (pronounce the U)
Let's go skiing!= Suki ni ikimashyo. スキにいきましよ
Snowboard = sunoboodo スノボド
Skis = suki スキ
powder = powda パウダ
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito View Post
I am sukii-kichigai (sp?)
 
thanks
ども domo
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
avalanche;

nadare
なだれ
雪崩

nadare o mita= I saw an avalanche.

nadare is kind of like "don't dare", eh?

and for those who think the Kanji 雪崩 looks like a bunch of chicken scratches, I'll break it down (because in all honesty, it can be really interesting stuff.)

the first kanji 雪 (yuki) shows snow. Perhaps you can see the sky in the top line, the cloud in the second horizontal line, the dashes of falling snow and the three layers at the bottom showing something falling from the sky and building up.
the second kanji 崩 (actually 崩れる) actually means kuzureru= collapse. See the mountain at the top? the 山 (yama)? Under it is two moons 月月 (tsuki). If the mountains collapse you will see twice as many moons. :

combine snow (yuki) and collapse (kuzureru) and get nadare.
combine 雪(yuki) and 崩れる(kuzureru) and get 雪崩

holy insane... wish me luck on this thread...
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito View Post
I am sukii-kichigai (sp?)
Lunatic
Kichigai
きちがい
気遅い

watashi wa suki-kichigai = I am a ski-freak/dork/lunatic...

the kitchen-guy at work is a fricking lunatic. All them knives...
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
ICE
KOORI?????ko o ri
???
?
looks very similar to

?? ?? /mizu / water

note the days of the week. m / t / w / th /?f / sa / su
?????????????????????????

??? suiyobi = wednesday.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
mods--
pleae delete the question-mark posts.
post #14 of 28
heio gozzamassu ... (phonetic) ...

domo orogato (formal phonetic) ..

hajimea ..


will you be able to figure those out .. :
post #15 of 28
An usefull apres-ski phrase - Nama beer dai, kudasai
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
1- heio gozzamassu ... (phonetic) ...

2- domo orogato (formal phonetic) ..

3- hajimea ..


will you be able to figure those out .. :
1- ohayo gozaimasu. = Good morning.
2- domo arigato (gozaimasu) = formal thank you
domo = thanks
3- Hajimete= start/go/begin/first time.
post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sudovec View Post
An usefull apres-ski phrase - Nama beer dai, kudasai
useful indeed.

Fresh/uncooked/(draft) beer
Nama
なま


Beer
Biru
ビル

Large/Big
Dai
(note how the kanji looks like a person holding his arms out to show size.)

University
Daigaku
大学 (literal translation = big school)

Please
(O) kudasai
下さい

Two (of something general when ordering. Counting is another thread.)
Futatsu
二つ
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
Ice
KOORI ko o ri


looks very similar to 水/mizu/water

note the days of the week
M / T / W / TH / F / Sa / Su
月 / 火 /  / 木 / 金 / 土 / 日
Wednesday
Suiyobi
水 曜日 (literally translates as water day) Can you guess which is fire day? Wood/tree day? Gold day? Day day? Earth day? Moon day? (I taught you the moon kanji already.)
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
COLD
SAMUI
寒い

(Watashi wa) samui desu. = (I am) cold.
post #20 of 28
Samurai, great thread!
What about usage of "Hara Heta" - I understood that this is something like "empty stomach", a very informal way to express "I'm hungry". Is it OK to use this? Domo.
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sudovec View Post
What about usage of "Hara Heta" - I understood that this is something like "empty stomach", a very informal way to express "I'm hungry". Is it OK to use this? Domo.
Stomach    
Hara
はら
腹         

 
Stomach
Onaka
おなか
お腹

note the kanji (腹) is the same for both pronunciations. In yamagata, in northern japan, we say Onaka ga heta. for I'm hungry. Hara ga heta is fine too, just not common where I live. (the ga does not exist in english and can often get skipped over in japanese too. Just sounds kind of countryish/hickish.)

Inside/Middle
Naka remember stomach = onaka.
なか
中  pretty easy to see how this kanji represents middle/inside/central.
中  can also be pronounced chu which can mean medium/average/in the middle of. (this is the double pronunciation that makes learning these kanji so difficult. They change... and right when you think you read something on the street, you'll discover you're dead wrong.) although you may understand what the pictograms mean.

Denwachu = I'm on the phone.(or- I'm in the middle of a phone call.)
Denwa= でんわ = 電話 = telephone.

chewchu would be an example of my wife's and my japenglish for I'm eating./I have food in my mouth./ I'm chewing. we have our own language.
post #22 of 28
chudan .... stomach or middle ???

jodan ... head ???

hara I thought was a place ... the core or center of mass in the area near the stomach ??
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
1. chudan .... stomach or middle ???
2. jodan ... head ???
3. hara I thought was a place ... the core or center of mass in the area near the stomach ??
1. Chudan stumps both me and my dictionary.

2.Joke
Jodan
じょうだん
冗談

3. Hara ga itai. can mean I have a stomach ache. and true feelings.
Hara ga tatsu. translates as become angry.
so I can understand how you got CORE out of it.

Sore (wa) jodan desuka? = Are you joking? [literal= That (wa) joke is?]
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Steeps are fun!

Steep (pitch/slope)
Kyuu
きゅう

same pronunciation, different kanji.
Nine
Kyuu
きゅう



Kyuu shamen suki (wa) tanoshi desu.

[Literal- Steep slope ski(ing) (wa) fun is.]
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 
Vacation/holiday/break/day off
yasumi
やすみ
休み

note the first kanji 休 comes from 人 + 木 (person/hito + tree/ki) and represents a person resting under a tree.

(watashi no) ski no yasumi wa nagai deshita.
(My) ski break was long.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Bear
Kuma
くま


Not entirely related to skiing or Japan, but the photo deserves its place.
It stood 14' feet high, and weighed over 1600 lbs. The world record Grizzly. After it was killed, the remains of at least two humans were found in the stomach. The article I took it from said he was shot close to 20 times. 4 times by a 38 pistol (the owner was a hiker the bear had eaten) and two clips worth of 7mm rounds shot by the hunter shown here. He was hunting deer, the bear rushed him from 50 meters. He unloaded one clip, and dropped the bear at his feet. Then reloaded a second clip and unloaded again in his head to kill him. It is on display at the Anchorage airport to remind tourists of the dangers of the wild.

14' tall is you standing on your second story floor, looking out the window into the eye of a grizzly, the head of which is bigger than your torso, the nose of which is bigger than your head. In your fear, you say KUMA.
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
post #28 of 28
I understand that they start the attack with a tearing swat to the head that crushes and scalps ... and immobilizes.

The guy with a 32 .... never stood a chance unless he rammed it down the bears throat and/or got lucky with an eye shot and that might just scare it off.

Scares the crap out of me .... I had a large male black run out in front of me this summer .. the muscle and the speed ... I can't even imagine that monster in motion.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Humour and Fun Stuff
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Humour and Fun Stuff › The Japanese (ski) word list...