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Gear Under the Lodge Table

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I grew up skiing Mad River Glen, then strayed for about 20 years before returning in the '90s. Amazingly, I found MRG unchanged: you could still leave your pack under a table at the Basebox and be sure no one would take it. Over the years, I've come to value mountains like this. For example, my wife and I skied A-Basin a few years back and left all our gear in the base lodge during the day. Whitewater, in the BC interior, was a welcome throwback, with expensive backpacks full of serious gear hung on hooks on the base lodge wall. And even here in Europe, I've discovered Andermatt, where day skiers stash their backpacks in lockless cubbyholes next to the cable car. To me, this sense of honest community is priceless. How many of you have stories of mountains where you can leave your stuff unattended?
post #2 of 22
This reminds me of the other thread on "ski areas you've never heard of." All those little ski hills seem to be about that kind of ski experience, and there are still a lot of them left, it would seem.

Here in my corner of Montana we have Bridger Bowl, which is a non-profit community ski area. People can stash their stuff in a corner and leave it; people can brown bag if they want (the big families often do)...it's a really relaxed place with a great vibe.

We also have Big Sky, which is more or less a destination resort. As far as I know, crime, petty or otherwise, is not an issue there, but it doesn't have that same community feel as Bridger. Iamgine trying to leave your pack in the corner of Dante's? Big Sky does have the vertical, though. It also has one of those pay-the-man secure ski checks at the base. It would never occur to anyone at Bridger to build one of those. (FWIW, I ski both areas and enjoy both tremendously.)

In a somewhat recent interview (no citation, don't remember the pub, sorry), Plake defined good skiing by the atmosphere in the lodge, not by what the terrain is like or the quality of the on-snow experience. Just what it felt like in a small ski mountain's lodge. (He referred to the smell of drying socks, I believe.)

Of course, every ski mountain is a locals' mountain to someone, and most locals would feel the same about they mountain the grew up on or are raising their kids on.

Good idea for a thread. I'd be interested in a bigger list of such areas in Europe, Prickly, unless of course you want to keep them secret--I'd understand. I've only been to name-brand ski towns in Europe, e.g. Cham, St Anton, Wengen, etc.
post #3 of 22
This sure reminds me of our closest place There are 2 rustic lodges where "EVERYBODY know Your Name " and the grub is good

The skiing is uncrowded and inexpensive with 1250 well maintained vert and you can leave your stuff anywhere in the lodges and it'll still be there when you get back .

Man i DO luv this place --the big boyz could take a lesson from these guys in terms of skier satisfaction
post #4 of 22
I'm one of those people who gets pissed when I get in and sit down and there's ten bags under the only open table in the lodge. What do I do? I move them. Get your bags out of my space.
post #5 of 22

Time was...

I learned to ski at the St. Lawrence State Park ski hill on route 37 just outside of Ogdensburg, NY. It was in the St. Lawrence River valley for crying out loud. The bigest hills are the manure piles from all the dairy farms.

I heard that it was installed because the local congressman wanted a place for his kids to ski.

It had everything that a nine year old could want in 1972. There was a J-bar, night skiing and tree skiing. The vertical drop was about 25 feet. On one side of the hill, you could sled. On the other side you could ski. Only skiiers could ride the J-bar. It was free to ski there.

There was a small multi level lodge that was the pinacle of 1970's state sponsored design. It had a huge, round stone fireplace on the lower level with a built in wooden bench seat encircling the hearth. I remember that we would ski and sled until we were blue in the face and most other places. We would stomp into the lodge with our heavy ski-boots down those narrow carpeted stairs and pack into those bench seats. We would pull our boots, hats and mittens off and lay them around the hearth to steam up the room. There were big thermoses of hot chocolate and it seemed most people shared. There was no kitchen. Just rest rooms.

The lift towers have been removed and the area is now used for cross country skiing. The lodge is still there.

People from the Amish community park their horse and wagon there in the summer and sell overpriced baskets and dry bread... to people from Jersey who probably ski at Killington.
post #6 of 22
When i have stuff, which isn't that often, i just leave it on top of the lockers no matter where i am. I haven't had any problems with anyone taking it yet.
post #7 of 22
I do it all the time at Sugarloaf, Sunday River, Saddleback, on and on.
The question I would have is......
Can I do at Alta, Snowbird, Solitude and Snowbasin??
Seriously, can I??
post #8 of 22
My problem isn't other people taking my stuff, it's me leaving it there.

At Mad River one time I left my gloves, goggles, and helmet on the table at the end of the day. When we got back to the (club) lodge I realized it was gone, never to be seen again. But, the next morning I asked at the cashiers and she went and got it for me, no problem. She said they knew I'd be back for it!

And then, I went skiing. What a great place!
post #9 of 22
Repeat story, but at one resort, which will remain nameless, we went in for lunch at one of the lodges. It was pretty busy, and there were few tables empty. One table we noticed had a couple of bags on top of it, as did the next table. We went through the line (there were 4 of us) and since the tables were still unoccupied by people, we went to the table and put the bags on the floor and started to eat lunch.

Soon a woman not dressed for skiing comes over and says, "You can't sit here. This table is SAVED for someone." We ask, "Are they in line? I don't see them." She said, "No, they're out skiing, but they'll be in soon" or something like that.

Well, too bad, isn't it? You can guess our answer, we finished our lunch, and no one ever came to sit there while we ate, but she sure gave us daggers the whole time. Da noive.

You can't 'save' tables for people unless they're in the line getting food. Keep your bags off the tables, please.
post #10 of 22
once I left my skis outside the lodge. Can you believe it? skis? yes, I had a locker at the hill where I usually kept my stuff, skis, and boot dryers. I went in after skiing, had a few (ok lots) of beers and changed out of my boots... caught a ride home. a daily event really.

came the next day and my skis weren't in my locker: .
I went to the lost and found and the groomer kindly set them there.
Kirkwood can have a bro-bra atmosphere, but ski theives would get their asses kicked. very chill indeed.

BTW, Japan is also a crime-free environment.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devils Fiddle View Post
I'm one of those people who gets pissed when I get in and sit down and there's ten bags under the only open table in the lodge. What do I do? I move them. Get your bags out of my space.
I agree. Leave your stuff out of the way of other skiers. Let them have a nice unobscured table to rest and eat for 30 minutes. Stash your stuff in a corner somewhere. Or, what we do, place it outside under a deck or somewhere. Normally our lunch is in the pack so it needs to be outside in the cold anyway.

The other thing I hate is when the people who do not ski but are there all day reading or knitting or whatever and take up a whole table for eight (for the 30 minutes 3 times a day that only 1/2 of their people are in the lodge) while there is only one of them in the lodge all day.

Most people need table space for only 20-30 minutes once or twice a day. Make accomodations for them please.
post #12 of 22
I have an ultra gaper ski bag that anybody looking for good equipment to steal wouldn't go near. It is a nylon dark purple with fluorescent pink trim eyesore but it has served me ever since the days it was stylish. I leave the thing wherever without thinking twice.
post #13 of 22
Whitetail has cubby holes. The trick is to have a ton of junk to cram in a cubby andd fill it. I tend to have only a pair of shoes and socks to store in the cubby after I've booted up. It seems like sharing the cubby hole would be unsanitary or something. I often find my sneakers have been removed so Mr. Bigbag can have his own space. I started putting my shoes outside against the side of the building so they would not be taking up valuable space that could be used by conspicuous consumers. Once I came back and found a huge mound of stuff where my shoes had been neatly tucked into a corner outside of the building. I asked the insane lady guarding the pile of crap, "Where are my shoes?" She had no idea. I dug down to the bottom of the pile and found my shoes right where I left them, at least they weren't removed to make room for the possessions of the well to do. My shoes are raggedy, but they don't smell.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
...a woman not dressed for skiing comes over and says, "You can't sit here. This table is SAVED for someone."...
The insane lodge lady is a central figure in the skiing experience. I miss even that.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
Repeat story, but at one resort, which will remain nameless, we went in for lunch at one of the lodges.
Did said resort start with S, end in E, and just had an ESA event there?

Happened all the time when LM and I used to ski there. May have the "real New England" look and feel, but has a privileged entitlement mentality in the base lodges that I've never seen elsewhere.

I guess it goes with the old idea of "reserved pews" in the old New England churches.
post #16 of 22
No, not that one, Mark. This one started with B and ended with T.
post #17 of 22
I used to get a locker, but I've been just stashing the bag in a corner or cubby or on top of the lockers for a few years now and have not had anything go missing.

Putting bags under the table bugs me because I like to put my feet there when I'm sitting down and eating lunch.

Saving tables - a no no.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkXS View Post
Did said resort start with S, end in E, and just had an ESA event there?

Happened all the time when LM and I used to ski there. May have the "real New England" look and feel, but has a privileged entitlement mentality in the base lodges that I've never seen elsewhere.

I guess it goes with the old idea of "reserved pews" in the old New England churches.
If you experienced that at Stowe, it wasn't a New England sense of entitlement, it was a Montreal sense of entitlement. I do like Bonni and just sit there. It really steams me when I come in with a bunch of ski school kids and some Montrealer is reading her book in street clothes "saving" a whole table. We're supposed to eat standing or sit on the floor? I don't think so...
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
If you experienced that at Stowe, it wasn't a New England sense of entitlement, it was a Montreal sense of entitlement. I do like Bonni and just sit there. It really steams me when I come in with a bunch of ski school kids and some Montrealer is reading her book in street clothes "saving" a whole table. We're supposed to eat standing or sit on the floor? I don't think so...
This is common place in the Mid-Atlantic as well. At one local resort it's not uncommon to see about 80% of the tables in the lodge being "saved" by non-skiers.

We usually tailgate in the parking lot, but when we do go in it's almost become a game with us. We look around and sit down at the table that we think is going to get the biggest reaction from the self appointed owner.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
If you experienced that at Stowe, it wasn't a New England sense of entitlement, it was a Montreal sense of entitlement. I do like Bonni and just sit there. It really steams me when I come in with a bunch of ski school kids and some Montrealer is reading her book in street clothes "saving" a whole table. We're supposed to eat standing or sit on the floor? I don't think so...
Just sit down. What do you think that some lady is going to do? Physically force you out of your seat? I think not!


I'm glad to see some others agree that it's annoying when people leave bags under the table.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
How many of you have stories of mountains where you can leave your stuff unattended?
I've left my pack on top of the lockers at the Maggie at Breck at least a thousand times and never had anything stolen. I'm not sure what that means except that I've saved a small fortune in locker fees.
post #22 of 22
Back here in Oz you need to keep your eyes peeled for thieves... I remember a number of years ago dropping into a mountain-top lodge for a quick "pick-me-up" hot chocolate. We dumped our gloves, goggles etc. on a table (it was only 10.00am and the lodge was near empty) and wandered into the line. About 30 seconds later a 20-something year old male sat down at our table, opened a sports bag and proceeded to scoop all of our equipment into the bag. We confronted the youth and he tried some excuse like "I thought they belonged to my mates"... yeah right! There was only 6 others in the lodge besides my group (all sitting at various tables) and he wasn't dressed to go skiing.

Suffice to say, we up-ended his bag and retrieved our equipment and then called for the ski patrol (he had quite a stash of equipment in that bag that probably didn't belong to him). Last we saw of this guy was the ski patrol leading him off to ski patrol hut with him protesting his innocence.
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