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Skiing Everyday - Too much of a good thing!

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
This being the first season I've been blessed with the opertunity to ski everyday I have a question. Generally in working out people say you must only work an individual muscle group every other day, giving your muscles time to recuperate. But what about using the same muscles everyday on the hill? Is there anything I can do to allow my body to recover and my muscles to grow when I'm unable to give myself days of rest?
post #2 of 27

find the oldest instructor on your hill

watch em ski. i bet he doesnt use alot of muscle
post #3 of 27
It's not like you have to pound it everyday. Your body will let you know what it can handle. Skiing everyday, regardless of the conditions, is going to be one the best things you've ever done for your skiing .
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmordski View Post
Generally in working out people say you must only work an individual muscle group every other day, giving your muscles time to recuperate.
Skiing by itself works large groups of muscle and obviously your core and cardio. You can ski every day with proper fuel, sleep and hydration. With a specific day off do something different to move and flush system; bike, jump rope, jump on tramp...but forget the iso muscle stuff. If you are power lifting and bulking iso and rest intervals are important. With skiing staying light on your feet while improving activity strength and endurance is key with your own body feedback providing daily recommendations.
post #5 of 27
You will want to keep your protein intake high, and get at least 8hrs of sleep. Supplement yourself with high vitamin C dosages and some chondroitin/glucosamine with MSM would be a good idea as well. Multivitamin is a given and a calcium magnesium zinc combo on top of that will help as well. Remember when working out or doing strenuous activities where there is muscle damage, your body treats it as an injury, so it needs more nutrients than a sedintary being. RDA does not apply to an athlete.

If I were to name two things as most important it would be high protein intake and sleep. BTW not all protein is created equal, the most bioavailable protein you can consume is whey protein, and bioavailbility is what lets your body actually absorb it rather than waste it in the toilet.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmordski View Post
This being the first season I've been blessed with the opertunity to ski everyday I have a question. Generally in working out people say you must only work an individual muscle group every other day, giving your muscles time to recuperate. But what about using the same muscles everyday on the hill? Is there anything I can do to allow my body to recover and my muscles to grow when I'm unable to give myself days of rest?
I think you'll find that at some point in the season your body will have adjusted so that skiing hard daily will be easy for you. Skiing is really not all that physically demanding if your body is used to it and your technique is good.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by breckview View Post
....Skiing is really not all that physically demanding if your body is used to it and your technique is good.
Hmmm…let’s ask Ted or Bode about this or some of us mortals who continue to raise and push limits finding ourselves gassed after a run. Skiing can be as physically demanding as any sport, if not more demanding regardless of technique or your body being conditioned especially considering varying conditions and the multiple “dimensions” encountered on our playing field. Skiing is like any anaerobic or aerobic activity, you get out what you put in and for some the bar is always being adjusted.

Skiing does not need to be hard but that certainly does not mean that everyone reaches a physical comfort level and then maintains it to cover the anticipated activity. Sure with muscle memory and repetition a skier can exert much like someone who “steady states” a treadmill at 5 miles an hour for 30 minutes while gabbing on their cell phone. Certainly going through any athletic motion your body is always seeking to minimize energy consumption. Can you look and feel good all the while accomplishing your skiing activity? Sure. But for some of us that is a red light of being much too comfortable.
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
Sure. But for some of us that is a red light of being much too comfortable.
Have you every free-skied pretty much every day in a winter before? I hate to break it to you but there are skiers on the hill that can rip any run over and over and then go for a run afterwards so they don't gain weight in the winter.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by breckview View Post
Have you every free-skied pretty much every day in a winter before? I hate to break it to you but there are skiers on the hill that can rip any run over and over and then go for a run afterwards so they don't gain weight in the winter.
Question to your answer; yes
Response to your statement; save the condescending tone as I’ve skied for 40 years in Colorado and know all types of "ripping skiers" and I don't need you "breaking" any news to me. For that matter, what is the point you are trying to make? What are you trying to say with gaining weight in winter, ripping runs over and over...then making another run:
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmordski View Post
This being the first season I've been blessed with the opertunity to ski everyday I have a question. Generally in working out people say you must only work an individual muscle group every other day, giving your muscles time to recuperate. But what about using the same muscles everyday on the hill? Is there anything I can do to allow my body to recover and my muscles to grow when I'm unable to give myself days of rest?
When I work myself thoroghly, I find that sitting in a HOT bath with a cup of epsom salts really helps me bounce back the next day. I found this to be effective even after especially intensive, bell to bell powder days.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
When I work myself thoroghly, I find that sitting in a HOT bath with a cup of epsom salts really helps me bounce back the next day. I found this to be effective even after especially intensive, bell to bell powder days.

I'm sure the tub is great, but don't you need to drink a couple of these while you soak for full recharge?

post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
For that matter, what is the point you are trying to make? What are you trying to say with gaining weight in winter, ripping runs over and over...then making another run:
Didn't intend to be condescending...

The guy basically asked if it was OK to ski everyday. It's my opinion that when you do that, your body adjusts so that skiing becomes relatively easy physically. If you've never reached that point, that doesn't mean others don't. Let's compare: 6 hours of skiing with a 6 hour run. I don't think there's any comparison. Before the Imperial Express was built I'd finish every day with at least one 25 minute hike to stay climbing shape. The hike always tired me far more than the 4-5 hours of skiing before.

Just my opinion...
post #13 of 27
I pretty much skiied daily when I was up in VT this past winter and tho it tired me out pretty quickly at first, I did end up getting used to it.....

Now I ate a carb/protein meal at lunch & drank a protein shake with glutamine after I was done for the day & I think that helped me also....
post #14 of 27
I am on the 9th straight day of skiing tomorrow. I think I could get about a 150 straight if I want....
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I am on the 9th straight day of skiing tomorrow. I think I could get about a 150 straight if I want....
Good on ya...Looks like you are using the days well in that Bump MA you posted.
post #16 of 27
We usually ski for 15 straight days (hard and fast, albeit on groomers), and have yet to notice any real fatigue. A couple of times got some knee and thigh pains, but a HOT BATH and advil took care of those.

And I'm 52!
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I am on the 9th straight day of skiing tomorrow. I think I could get about a 150 straight if I want....
how many are teaching days?
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
how many are teaching days?
Well its now 11 and 6 of those are teaching days ......but on my work days I still get a min of 15,000 vert in. IN fact one day when it was good and my kids parents came at 3:10, I got roughly 32,000 feet in one day and I worked 6 hours that day.

Here is how it works there are three trams that go before 9am most mornings. that right these is 8,700 feet. Work kinderbirds and get off at 3:10 catch the next tram at 3:15. Each tram goes of at 7.5 min intervals. Yes it is very hard to to catch each one but its possible if you can manage fast speeds in rough snow. S0 5 tram rides(14,500 feet of vert) before that lift closes. Then you head over to Peruvian Express you will get up that twice. another 5200 feet of vert. Then you head over to Wilbere Chair which closes at 4:30, you will get there around 4:03 wilbere 7 min to get up 1min to get down so 3 more runs at 1000feet a piece gets you another 3,000 vertical feet grand total for more the day. 31,400 vertical feet more than most tourist manage in a day here.

I get what you getting at but I am not the normal lets go drink all night ski teacher, I am here to ski, and if I didnt get to ski that much in my days working I wouldnt instruct. I like teaching but I have allways been a skier first teacher second.
post #19 of 27
didn't mean anything personal by my comment. Great profs on getting that much vert on work days.

For lots of us, teaching days aren't filled with that much vertical. I could say I'm on day 23 total, but is misleading, I've only gotten to free ski about 20 of those days. (like I believe you do, I usually teach classes that I am able to at least practice some turns).

Posting time 1:03 am? sup with that? how do you ski that much without getting any sleep?
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
didn't mean anything personal by my comment. Great profs on getting that much vert on work days.

For lots of us, teaching days aren't filled with that much vertical. I could say I'm on day 23 total, but is misleading, I've only gotten to free ski about 20 of those days. (like I believe you do, I usually teach classes that I am able to at least practice some turns).

Posting time 1:03 am? sup with that? how do you ski that much without getting any sleep?


party upstairs woke me up. I was asleep at 8:30 untill about 12:30.....
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I am on the 9th straight day of skiing tomorrow. I think I could get about a 150 straight if I want....
This assumes everything goes perfect. Pull a muscle and you'll miss a few days. Blow a knee and its the season. Luck has alot to do with how many days you can pull in a season.
post #22 of 27
Folks often talk about vertical feet skied in a day. Its an interesting number but what does it really mean (it certainly isn't the same as saying you have just run xx miles in a day)? Perhaps the number of turns would be more indicative of the work performed and the overall stress on your body?
post #23 of 27
On my days off I could careless how many feet I rack up, I spend alot of time exploring ,there is no need to rush. In my free time on work days I only used it to show that I am in fact am skiing and not just teaching wedge turns all days.

I never straightline unless turning isnt a option. ie narrow choke point elect.....turns are the reason I ski.

only on epic would someone suggest you would pull a muscle or blow out your knee, on TGR the response would be WAY different.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
only on epic would someone suggest you would pull a muscle or blow out your knee, on TGR the response would be WAY different.
What, they don't blow knees on TGR?
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
...
only on epic would someone suggest you would pull a muscle or blow out your knee, on TGR the response would be WAY different.
word
post #26 of 27
Not sure where you are living so that you can ski every day if you choose but for your sake I hope its somewhere out west...preferable somewhere that gets lots of powder.

My suggestion would be to avoid moguls like the plague. I lived at alta last winter and skied nearly every day for the season. Ski the powder when the snow is good. When its not snowing hike for fresh snow and in the case of high pressure break out the 210s and bomb some groomers.

People on these boards make me laugh with responses about protein intake, vitamins, and getting enough sleep. If you are lucky enough to have a job that allows your to ski every day it is unlikley that you will be able to get lots of sleep and always eat right.

I worked nights, partied after work, worked the breakfast shift and skied during the day. Enjoy it while you can.....best 5 months of my life. You can sleep during the summer when the snow is gone!
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbadwulf11 View Post
My suggestion would be to avoid moguls like the plague.
What fun would that be? As long as your technique is good, your body adjusts to moguls skiing as well. Look at the guys/gals who do the Enduro at A-basin.

Quote:
People on these boards make me laugh with responses about protein intake, vitamins, and getting enough sleep. If you are lucky enough to have a job that allows your to ski every day it is unlikley that you will be able to get lots of sleep and always eat right.
I think you're extrapolating your experience of a season to everyone. Sure, there's a set of seasonal workers where your comment applies exactly. But most of the people I know that get in ~ 100 days a year have real jobs and eat and sleep very well. The reason they can ski every day is simply because their jobs are flexible and travel time is short. I tend to get up early and work until about 11a, then go skiing for few hours. Then I usually work a few hours in the evening and on weekends.
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