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how to take jumps

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have been boarding for a few years now (avg. a couple of trips a year). I definitely don't consider myself an expert yet, but I am quite confident on the board and can carve nicely. My goal for this season is to be able to take jumps off of mounds.

From what I remembered this past season, when I first attempted to take jumps, landing was a big problem. I suspect the problem started much earlier right before leaving the ground. Am I just not putting enough weight to the front?

Any pointers' appreciated.
post #2 of 15
There's more than one way to do this, as we'll see from the number of posts that'll be here in a while. You'll find one that works. Experiment around. Anyway, one thing to remember is when you go up the ramp, if you keep your body perpendicular to the surface, you'll end up with your weight to the rear by the time you take off, which means you'll land on your rear, and have problems. Keep your weight even on both feet but keep your body in line with gravity, which on the ramp means leaning a little forward. That way you can land evenly.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Yeah thanks for the tip.

My problem was exactly that ... landing with the tail end of the board. It gets quite hairy as the board compresses and launches me off like a spring.

The end of last season was when I first attempted to do jumps. I'm leaving for Lake Tahoe this evening and I'm optimistic to be able to master the jumps for this season.
post #4 of 15
Hope my advice helps. I have the same problem when I sort of forget and end you on my rear foot when I launch.
post #5 of 15
Hey, you could try to hop your board off the snow and practice landing smooth. Without a kicker, just to get really centered and balanced. Next, try to ollie (spring off the tail of your board) and nollie (spring off nose).
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Hey, you could try to hop your board off the snow and practice landing smooth. Without a kicker, just to get really centered and balanced. Next, try to ollie (spring off the tail of your board) and nollie (spring off nose).
Good advice. I wish we had enough snow that I could try them.
post #7 of 15

Air time...

Black,

actually your not alone...many peers,students that I coach have similiar concerns. Here's a suggestion, you can obviously do with this information as you wish;
  1. Work on increasing the the range of flexsion in your ankles & knees. During the approach to the jump is when this is beneficial for a more succesful out come. "Stay low..be powerful".
  2. You'd be supprised how much more range of motion you actually are capable of. Get a fellow instructor to video a run or two of you hitting some jumps.
  3. Choose a starting spot above the feature that allows you to approach at a comfortable pace, it is a wise idea to avoid any last minute turns or speed checks.
  4. Try an approach with you upper torso rather relaxed and upright, try flexing / closing both your ankles & knees (almost like a cowboy riding a horse).
  5. Another fun task to consider...think of trying to "high-five" the jump. While on the approach to the jump extended out your lead hand as if you were going to literally give the jump a high five. Yes I know this isn't exactly the mechanics that are going to allow you sucesfull airtime, bear with me please. When coaching smaller kids..this especially helps the tendance to avoid being very tall during the jump approach. This task in theory will allow the rider to incorperate more flexsion & extension of the ankles & knees.
My general observation is that the approach of a feature..is very key time to make sure it's all systems go before take off. The lower your center of gravity is at this point..the greater level of succese you'll reap.This info. here is buy no means gospel...in this forum it is always open for constructive criticizms, debate, and general comments.

Be safe, practice lots..oh yeah have fun too.

Jonah D.
post #8 of 15
I will echo Jonah's advice about getting low before take off. It's also important to "take off" on take off. Many beginning jumpers are stiff on take off. This let's the jump "throw you". If you extend from a low position at take off, you will end up better able to "stomp" the landing with both feet instead of landing on your butt.
post #9 of 15

might as well jump

Here's a progression that will have you landing (and floating) with stability and confidence:

1 - practice w/o your board on a flat piece of turf. start by lifting up your front foot and jumping off your rear foot (mimics riding up the angle of the kicker). bring both feet up underneath you while in the air, and then land on both feet simultaneously while absorbing the touchdown with your legs.
the quieter your landing, the better the absorbing. (try it 6-8 times, or until you can do it 5 times in a row)
2 - do the same exercise with the board on (when you can do 5 in a row really well go to step 3)
3 - traverse across a gentle slope and make the same move (when you can do 5 in a row really well, go to step 4)
4 - ride straight down the gentle slope and make the same move (when you can do 5 in a row really well, go to step 5)
5 - choose a small bump of snow, or a roller and make your new move off of the bump/roller (this gives you more air time and a sense of float before the landing) (when you can do 5 in a row really well, go to step 6)*
6 - start with a small/beginner kicker in the park and practice your new move (as you consistently land the jumps, start to add more speed, and air time)*
7 - gradually work you way up to bigger and bigger kickers *

*as you start to get more air and begin landing on the downside of bumps or jumps, you'll have to tweak the flatland exercises to have the front foot landing slightly first (really both feet will still land together on the downslope of the jump, but inorder to mimic the effect of the downslope you'd need to land front foot slightly first on flat ground)

Let me know if you have any questions.

Have fun
post #10 of 15
Good suggestions, guys. I'll just chime in with one tip - Although it may seem obvious, I had trouble with riding (and therefore, landing) on a flat board when I first started.

Get comfortable riding flat! Next time you're on one of those boring green feeder trails that tends to turn your mind off, see how far you can ride without the board being on edge. It'll help when you start landing bigger jumps.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the valuable advices. I'm really looking forward to trying the jumps now and hopefully able to master it. I was at Heavenly (Lake Tahoe, CA) last week, but the resort was shut down due to extreme high winds. : I'll go at it again in the coming weeks.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u View Post
Good suggestions, guys. I'll just chime in with one tip - Although it may seem obvious, I had trouble with riding (and therefore, landing) on a flat board when I first started.

Get comfortable riding flat! Next time you're on one of those boring green feeder trails that tends to turn your mind off, see how far you can ride without the board being on edge. It'll help when you start landing bigger jumps.
That is an interesting advice.

I actually do have a question on riding flat. How does one ride flat w.o. ever catching an edge? Seems it's only a matter of time before I catch an edge and eat snow, which is why I always end up riding on edges. :
post #13 of 15
To ride a flat board straight down the hill you need to load all your weight on your front foot. Think about getting your back leg dead straight, moving your hips as far forward as you can while keeping them level to the board and bending your front knee. High stance angles may have some impact on the movement, but that's the idea.
post #14 of 15
Or...

Find out what it feels like to be totally neutral on the board. While in a flat spot, get in a position that allows you to put even pressure on the balls and heels of both feet. In other words, 25% on front foot ball, 25% on front foot heel, 25% on rear foot ball, 25% on rear foot heal. I think it was K.C. who called this "Four on the Floor". You achieve this by being in a very neutral position over your bindings - lined up feet, knees, hips, shoulders. Stay moderately flexed. Then, head down a slope like this with your head turned in the direction of travel. Voila! You can ride straight down the slope. You will also be able to adjust to any trail inconsistancies or accidental edge hookups because you are in a neutral position.

This "Four on the Floor" position is useful for a lot of things in snowboarding. Specifically, I teach it a lot for 50/50's and boardslides. It is also useful for a lot of turning drills and halfpipe riding.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills View Post
[snip] You will also be able to adjust to any trail inconsistancies or accidental edge hookups because you are in a neutral position. [snip]
The wierd snow of late has actually been great for offering up trail inconsistencies to practice this on in terms of icey, oily or grabby patches, etc. that you look to ride flatbase over.
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