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Slush conditions

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Seeing how this winter so far is just nasty warm.. and I'm going to ski in almost 60º temps tomorrow - what modifications are needed to style to be able to get through this? I've never been in such warm temps for an extended period. I'm figuring its going to be either ice crystals or slush, since I'm getting first tracks right after they open. I really don't know what to expect.

In general.. will the hills be faster/slower - easier or harder to turn on.. treat it like crud.. any help is appreciated
post #2 of 13
Slow, and a warm weather wax is a huge help. Even a universal wax is much better than nothing.

Ski slush like you should ski everything...on your edges. Put the skis on edge and let them "carve" through the slush, actually more like a high speed boat heeling as it makes a fast turn on the water or an airplane banking in a turn in the sky.


Ken
post #3 of 13
You may be surprised. I've been skiing in rain the last two days (hooray for ponchos) on very hard snow. Normally, rain means deliciously slippery soft snow, so it's been a surprise to me that the conditions are very hard.
post #4 of 13
Slush is like heavy powder. Common adjustments include using faster speeds to be able to use momentum to overcome the increased resistance from the heavier snow, shallower turns (don't turn across the fall line as much), more patience and a focus on smooth movements. I've also found that Zardoz "Notwax" works especially well in temps over 50 degress.
post #5 of 13
Like Therusty said In spring conditions I use the Zardoz notwax. If it is really slushy conditions I'll apply in the morning then again a couple hours later, then at lunch and again around 2pm.
post #6 of 13
Just noticed this thread start on Dec 13th…regardless, I would suggest updating your base structure to better manage the warmer conditions you describe.

Good Skiing!
post #7 of 13
Anyone have any suggestions for skiing grass, dirt and gravel? Many local resorts have closed around here. My local hill is down to a few runs on dirty snow and will probably close as well.

Slush sounds like heaven right about now.
post #8 of 13
I'll second DonDenver's advice as aggressive structuring makes a substantial difference. Combined with some low fluoro, floating turns with weight back a little for deeper mank.

For rocks, grass, dirt and sand dunes, we recommend our race base hard, 2 inches thick. You don't need to scrape and it's like adding epoxy to your bases for protection.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
Anyone have any suggestions for skiing grass, dirt and gravel? Many local resorts have closed around here. My local hill is down to a few runs on dirty snow and will probably close as well.

Slush sounds like heaven right about now.

Hey Tom,
Around here we have dubbed these conditions "snirt". : We ski them a lot of 'knee jerk' air whenever necessary by retracting the landing gear to save the edges from abuse. We do our ski base prep with a local concotion brewed from 2-parts ortho-grow lawn fertalizer, 1-part redi-mix and 1-part windshield antifreeze.

Best solution though might be mental rehersal of perfect arcs while sunning on a Florida beach with an umbrella drink in hand.
post #10 of 13
slush is fun, alot better than hardsnow. Just cut it and dont try to skid on it. slush rewards High edge angles and aggressive skiing.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
slush is fun, alot better than hardsnow. Just cut it and dont try to skid on it. slush rewards High edge angles and aggressive skiing.
And, as I learned from Mike Rogan at the Stowe Academy, even when you get tired, a proper stance and aggresssive attack angles will drive you through the slush easier than trying to push your way through.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
And, as I learned from Mike Rogan at the Stowe Academy, even when you get tired, a proper stance and aggresssive attack angles will drive you through the slush easier than trying to push your way through.
Yup
Attack it like you mean business!
post #13 of 13
Learning to think a turn ahead is key. Look for your turn points; in true slush piles there is no way to "muscle" the skis into turning. It's more like turn .... bust a plile .... turn ..... bust a pile ...
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