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Balance - Page 3

post #61 of 79
Ok there is way too much stuff in here for me to read..

I am no instructor (far from it) but OP here is a drill that helped me realize tipping and balance.. Find a gentle slope and stay on your bases till you pick a bit of speed, then to turn right, bend at the hips a bit and drop your left arm to your left boot.. You will automatically feel your skis tipping and you will turn right and some edge angle being etablished.. You will also feel your weight going on your left ski and your light ski a bit unweighted.. I think dropping the hand down and bending your waist sorta locks you in position and helps the whole balance aspect..

Do this for a few turns and look back and you will see that you actually made parallel tracks!! Good luck.
post #62 of 79
I'm not sure I like the idea of all this locking and counter stuff - suddenly skiing is being made a lot more difficult than I think it really is.
post #63 of 79
WTFH, on the contrary I think that drill is really simple and helps by restricting upperbody movement and hence the the range of motion and eventually its effect on balance..

For the longest time, I rode my bases while edging just a little. My first day on snow the instrucor taught that drill to show me how I could turn.. It wasnt till last year after some MA at epic that I realized that I neither was I not tipping the skis at all. I just happened to do that drill one day and voila, I could actually feel the skis ride the edge the whole way..

Then again I could be completely off base here as I am not qualified by any means to teach ..
post #64 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by coug View Post
Ok there is way too much stuff in here for me to read..

I am no instructor (far from it) but OP here is a drill that helped me realize tipping and balance.. Find a gentle slope and stay on your bases till you pick a bit of speed, then to turn right, bend at the hips a bit and drop your left arm to your left boot.. You will automatically feel your skis tipping and you will turn right and some edge angle being etablished.. You will also feel your weight going on your left ski and your light ski a bit unweighted.. I think dropping the hand down and bending your waist sorta locks you in position and helps the whole balance aspect..

Do this for a few turns and look back and you will see that you actually made parallel tracks!! Good luck.
Well, that is a perfect way of turning by using all the right elements: counter, angulation, outside ski pressure, hips into the turn etc. Great stuff. This is the way I teach beginners right from the start.
post #65 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
So, you are saying that if I am starting a turn, i.e. "falling" down the hill, I should transfer my weight to my inside ski, then as I ski round the turn, transfer to the outside as I prepare to fall towards the next turn?

Isn't that the opposite (i.e. counter) to skiing mainly on the outside ski?
Ooops, missed this post some days ago....

No, you should never shift your weight to your inside ski. To your new outside ski yes, but never to your inside ski. So when you are starting your turn, i.e. "falling" down the hill, you should transfer your weight to your new outside ski and keep it there as you ski arround the turn.

Actually, if you are travelling across the hill in a traverse you will have gravity pulling on you down in the fall line. To counter this pull of gravity you need to face and lean in the direction of the pull with your upper body. When you do this you will automatically shift your weight over to the downhill ski and your hipps will move uphill. When you turn arround everything will be the complete opposite. So the question now is how do you switch everything into the complete opposite? There will be two new major components involved, increase of speed and the centrifugal force. To manage the increase of speed you need to lean forwards and to manage the centrifugal pull you need to balance it out between the force of gravity and centrifugal force. This is the reason it can look a bit like banking at the top of the turn while at the end your body will turn into angulation (the traverse stand you started out with).
post #66 of 79
Thread Starter 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHUzaNWuE5M
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w2EGMODc4w


Finally got video of me skiing. These were blue runs in Bellayre mountain in the catskills. I usually ski a little more aggresivly then in the video. my battery died before I got warmed up to go to the more steep terrain. but anyhow this should show something
post #67 of 79
dlyulko --

These are pretty good videos. My compliments to your videographer. I'm sure the pros will have some good advice when they get back to their computers.

One thing I noticed is that you have a fairly pronounced stem. Unfortunately, I can't really tell if it is a cause, an effect, or an irrelevancy.
post #68 of 79
dlyulko,

Thanks for posting this video. It's fairly representative of where I see myself, and I'm sure I will learn a lot from the comments others with more experience provide.

Earlier this year I took a lesson from a guy at our local hill, and his primary comments at that time were to remove my wrists from my belt and get them forward. I tend(ed) to ski very upright, and the hands-at-belt position (apparently) encourages my weight to be back too far. I've found the hands-forward-and-wider position much more appealing for control, actually!

Looking forward to more info from others. Thanks again, dlyulko.
post #69 of 79
I read 2 pages and never say anyone talk about balance.

So yes balance is very important to good or improved skiing.

How much time do you spend on balance exercises when your not on skis?

Spend allot of time just standing on 1 foot or the other, move the other leg around.

Simple exercises like this will improve your balance, strengthen your legs and knees, improve small muscle corrections = Improve your on ski performance.
post #70 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlyulko View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHUzaNWuE5M
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w2EGMODc4w


Finally got video of me skiing. These were blue runs in Bellayre mountain in the catskills. I usually ski a little more aggresivly then in the video. my battery died before I got warmed up to go to the more steep terrain. but anyhow this should show something
All right, so you're sliding. I'll describe carving.

Carving is a very weird thing. You put your skis on edge and your body weight and muscle bend them. Once they are bent, they pull you around the turn. You are not actually physically turning your skis at all. They are simply pulling you through the turn.
Now, your question is balance. If I were to replicate the position required to carve a ski while on dry ground, I could not do it without falling over or leaning my hip against a wall. The fact is, carving requires using the force of inertia to essentially defy gravity.
So how can one do this? Speed. If you are not moving quickly, you will not be able to carve without falling over.
The necessary speed depends on the ski. The less side cut your ski has, the greater your speed must be to angulate well.For example, a GS or SuperG ski will require far more speed to turn than a slalom ski.

There's the technical crap. Now go do it, .
post #71 of 79

balance exercise

i now stand on one foot as often as possible while standing in line at the grocery, post office, etc. it really does strengthen the small muscles, but it also makes waiting in line much more tolerable.
post #72 of 79
dlyulco, great that you finally got a video made from your skiing. Great filming BTW and I ecpecially liked the part were you passed the ski instructor teaching students how to keep their shoulders level, keep their arms and weight forward and how to counter and a bunch of other usefull stuff that the drill in question is good for .

You ski well and you have a nice flow. I like your sence of rhythm and also that you keep on mooving down the hill in a controlled manner. There are lots of good stuff going on and it should be easy for you to fix the problems you are mentioning in your opening post.
First of all what comes to my attention is that your left and right turns are completely different. When you turn right you angulate nicely and pressure your outside ski but when you turn left you bank (lean into the turn). Look at the right turn at 0:14 as you pass the cameraman and compare it to the following left turn at 0:16. Turning right your hipps move nicely into the turn and you angulate to compensate for pressure build up due to effective edge hold. You are also correctly sligtly countered (facing slightly down the hill). Turning left you lean into the turn (left) and swing your hipps (rotate) out into the turn causing a huge skidd in a very square not to say over rotated stance. It may feel easier for you to turn left because when you turn right you have more edge hold. I had a student last year with the same kind of problem you have. He had been snowboarding for 10y and there turing left and right are based on totally different consepts. He was a regular so he was badly banking his right turns.
Your arms should also be opened a bit wider. This is easy to do, just open your elboves up a bit and angle your vrists a bit to to inside sort of in a hugging motion. It is individual and there is no right or wrong, everybody has their own style but keeping them as close to your body as you are keeping them limits your range of motion and give you little balance support.
The stem is a perfectly natural move at your level so dont worrie bout it but in order to eliminate it from your skiing you should first solve the problem with the left turn baninking business. Once you get confident at leaning in the opposite direction of where you want to turn and pressuring your outside ski while your hipps are brought into the turn it will be possible for you to change edges at the same time and lean into the new turn with your hips and upper body leaving your legs offset and tipped. Dont rush the transition. That is a very usual misstake. Take your time and let things happen.
post #73 of 79
Thread Starter 
Thanks TDK for your input

turning left is definetaly my weak side. I have improved dramatically in the past season. So I def think I will get better with time. Until this season I couldnt even do a hockey stop to my left. But I could have always done it at even the fastest speeds to my right. Do you think my legs are too close together
post #74 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlyulko View Post
Do you think my legs are too close together and I should have more forward lean?
No and No!

I think your stance is ok. For skidded turns I think a close stance is functional since its easier to controll your skis and shift pressure between legs with minimal CoM offset. If you have your feet too wide apart your stace would become too much two footed and outside ski pressuring at minimal speeds would be difficult. When you become better and you start carving a wider stance is going to be more sufficient.

Maybe you could lean a bit more forwards but so could Bode Miller.

If you havent any of HH books or DVD's get some.
post #75 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlyulko View Post
Finally got video of me skiing. These were blue runs in Bellayre mountain in the catskills. I usually ski a little more aggresivly then in the video. my battery died before I got warmed up to go to the more steep terrain. but anyhow this should show something
I agree that these videos were well done. It's been a long time since I skied at Bellayre, but I remember it. It's where I taught my bride to ski...

All of that said, you are doing what you say you are doing: you are turning your skis by swishing the tails out away from your body. You are able to control your direction by directing your skis in this way, and you are clearly keeping your speed under control, as well.

That said, tipping your skis onto their edges is a different movement. You can stand still on your skis (or in your boots!) and tip. I'd suggest trying this. Stand still and tip onto as high an edge angle as you can. Use your hands, arms, and body to balance. You'll find that by doing this, you can get onto very high edge angles without moving at all. Practice these movements to both sides.

Next, head out for very gentle terrain and experiment with those movements while you're sliding at a very slow speed. You do not need to go very fast or tip very much for this experiment. Just tip your skis using movements starting at the bottom of your feet and stay in balance with your hands, arms, and upper body as necessary (very little necessary at these speeds and amount of tipping). As you tip and slide, you'll see that your skis will turn you. You need only tip and untip them to control direction (no need to push, pull, or twist them).

Playing with these movements you'll discover that they are a different set of movements and skills from what you are doing today.

When you're balancing, I would suggest arm and hand position based on this: elbows in front of the spine, hands slightly wider than the elbows. This is a great position from which to manage balance with slight movements, and that's what you'll need to do.
post #76 of 79

Helped me balance...

I'm not the most wonderful skier in the world but I'd say I'm at least intermediate-advanced. When I first started, I had an instructor give me three things to remembers.

Always try to keep you upper body facing down the mountain with back more straight than not and knees slightly bent.

Shins against boots (hands in front of you will also help you keep from falling into the backseat)

Use the hips, knees and ankles to steer the skis, do not try to steer the skis with your whole body.

This may be old school, but it has been working well for me even on the new RX8s I just got!
post #77 of 79
yanksjags, a number of those recommendations have changed over the years due to the refinement of equipment and what it's able to do.

In general, your upper body should approximate your shin angle. Your body faces generally in the direction of the upcoming turn.

You should feel the front cuff of your boots, but not lever against them. Your hands can actually cause you to drop back or balance dropping back. In general, elbows in front of the spine, hands wider than the elbows.

Tipping is a more effective means of creating an arc than steering, although steering is often used to refine the arc. I would encourage a focus on tipping and managing the arc created primarily with the sidecut first rather than using a lot of steering to force the skis into a particular direction. I agree that you should usually avoid using the upper body to redirect the skis.

The RX8s are great for virtually any technique, but if you really work on your tipping skills, you'll likely find that they really come alive.
post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by yanksjags View Post
I'm not the most wonderful skier in the world but I'd say I'm at least intermediate-advanced. When I first started, I had an instructor give me three things to remembers.

Always try to keep you upper body facing down the mountain with back more straight than not and knees slightly bent.

Shins against boots (hands in front of you will also help you keep from falling into the backseat)

Use the hips, knees and ankles to steer the skis, do not try to steer the skis with your whole body.

This may be old school, but it has been working well for me even on the new RX8s I just got!
ssh is right, much has changed but much has also remained intact. With new gear we dont need to work that hard and we can minimize our movements but the movement patterns and techniques are many times the same. I especially like your advise "Use the hips, knees and ankles to steer the skis, do not try to steer the skis with your whole body" because skiing still is mostly happening from our waist down. Countering is also still important because we need to move our hipps into the turn and not rotate them towards the outside. In order to bring our hipps into the turn we need to counter as well. And there is nothing really wrong with old school, in 20y what we are doing now will also be considered old school if you ask our kids. LOL, I was talking to a bunch of kids the other day and made a total fool of myself on purpose by using words like Freestyle and Helicopter....
post #79 of 79
How to carve is really simple. I'm looking at the back part of your skis in the first video at 19 seconds. I notice your ski moving sideways. It happens in the next turn too going the other way. Skis seldom do that on their own. There are as far as I know, two ways to get your ski to go sideways. 1) push it sideways, and 2) rotate the ski so that your original direction and momentum are now sideways to the way the ski is pointing. Don't do that. Just tip the skis and let them go where they want and try not to fall off of them.

Try this exercise sitting in your chair at home. Hold out your hands palm down. Now rotate them so the palms are pointing down and to the right. Now rotate them the other way. Do the same thing with your skis on the snow. Just to cut off a possible future problem when you try this on the snow, if you must think of how to tip, try to move your hips and not just your knees to tip the skis. Concentrating on tipping the inside ski helps some people. I found that thinking of turning a steering wheel and imagining the spoke of the steering wheel tip like my skis was helpful.
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