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Goggles + Anti-Fog = I can't see anything

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I have a 5 year old pair of Oakley A-frame googles and they started fogging up the other day so i put some RainX anti-fog glass wipes (for a car) on the lenses. Now the lenses are all hazy, but you can almost move the haze around to different spots, you just can't remove it. I've tried soap, lens cleaner and glass cleaner- nothing helps. Anybody have any ideas on how clean them or did i just ruin the lens? It's the orange lens if that matters.
post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lehigh View Post
I have a 5 year old pair of Oakley A-frame googles and they started fogging up the other day so i put some RainX anti-fog glass wipes (for a car) on the lenses. Now the lenses are all hazy, but you can almost move the haze around to different spots, you just can't remove it. I've tried soap, lens cleaner and glass cleaner- nothing helps. Anybody have any ideas on how clean them or did i just ruin the lens? It's the orange lens if that matters.
Maybe try popping out the lens and washing them with dish washing detergent.
post #3 of 19
Vinegar?
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
No dice- soap, detergent, vinegar, glass cleaner, eye glass cleaner and even olive oil... i think I'm screwed...anybody have thoughts on the Pink Iridium lens?
post #5 of 19
I remember one time accidentally spraying CampDry instead of glass cleaner on a plastic clock face. It bonded with the plastic and that was the end of the clock face. But you say this MOVES around. Maybe just lots of rubbing with a flannel shirt is what is needed. Aren't there any instructions on the Rain-X bottle about how to get it off things you didn't want it on?
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lehigh View Post
I have a 5 year old pair of Oakley A-frame googles and they started fogging up the other day so i put some RainX anti-fog glass wipes (for a car) on the lenses. Now the lenses are all hazy, but you can almost move the haze around to different spots, you just can't remove it. I've tried soap, lens cleaner and glass cleaner- nothing helps. Anybody have any ideas on how clean them or did i just ruin the lens? It's the orange lens if that matters.
You might try a Smith's Smudge cloth. If that clears up most of the haziness, use a regular anti-fog cloth to finish the cleaning.
post #7 of 19
basic a-frame replacement lenses run 40 bucks from their website. If you've run all that soap and water and olive oil all over them, I'd assume they're gone. Once you get water between the lenses (if that happened while you were cleaning them) they'll fog up everyday from there on out. IME)
that must be the 8th time I've mentioned that on this forum.: sorry if I sould like a broken record.
post #8 of 19
Why would water dried between the lens cause future fog up? Not that I dont believe you, just that I cannot understand why? Evaporated water leaves nothing. It is a liquid vaporized into two gases. I could see if it were tap water, maybe chlorine... and clearly if you were using detergents... that would leave a film. Just curious. gordo
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lehigh View Post
I have a 5 year old pair of Oakley A-frame googles and they started fogging up the other day so i put some RainX anti-fog glass wipes (for a car) on the lenses. Now the lenses are all hazy, but you can almost move the haze around to different spots, you just can't remove it. I've tried soap, lens cleaner and glass cleaner- nothing helps. Anybody have any ideas on how clean them or did i just ruin the lens? It's the orange lens if that matters.
Rain X sucks on glass. It takes 6 months to wear it off a car windshield,with exposure to sun, rain and the action of WW blades. On a plastic lens, forget it.

I hate the stuff on windsheilds. You can't use you WW wipers, because it causes the water to form an opaque layer. It is fine if you don't use your WW wipers and you keep applying it. Kinda like drug addiction. Keep doing it and your OK. Stop and you have to go thru a withdrawal period (of poor visability) for several months till it wears off.

I hate to say it, but time for new goggle lens. Or new goggles. Now on the other hand, I've had great luck with the Smith wipes (cloths for $5).
post #10 of 19
It doesn't evaporate. It's super hard to dry out moisture that is between the lenses. If you separate them, you blow the foam/glue that keeps moisture out and will have reoccuring moisture arrive as if on cue. separating a double lens is a huge no-no; tragically, there is really no way of getting that water out without separating them should it seep in in the first place.
for me, a separated double lense= garbage. a drop of water between the lenses= garbage.
I'm not addicted to throwing my lenses away, I actually take really good care of them
post #11 of 19
RainX warns you not to apply to plastics. In addition, Oakley lenses have proprietary coatings that would be ruined by exposure to alcohol and the chemicals in RainX. The lenses are gone and you need replacements.

I recommend either High Intensity Persimmon or Sensor blue mirror for low light/ cloudy days, and Fire Iridium or Black Iridium for high sunlight. Only use the microfiber bag to blot away moisture on the lenses, never rub, and never use any chemicals or cleaners.

Keep your eyes open for a deal on Steepandcheap for goggles that cost less than a replacement lens. I have both Oakley Wisdom and Smith Prodigy Sphericals from there that cost under $50 each including shipping.
post #12 of 19
2 words -----------------------New goggles
post #13 of 19
5 year old lens? Cripes!! Buy a new lens, cheap A$$!! They aren't that much.

The coatings on the inside of most lenses are quite sensitive, and micro thin in the layer they are put on. Most manufacturers warn against wiping the inside of the lens with ANYTHING if it's damp/wet. I cleaned a lens on a pair of Bolle Chronos with glasses lens cleaner and DESTROYED the inner coating - JUST LIKE THAT, and I was an optical tech for 6 years, so I know how to treat things. You should NEVER wipe them wet. Suffice to say, if you cleaned them with all the things you mentioned above, there's nothing left on the lens. Get a new lens, or get some new goggles.

Go to Sierra Trading Post, use an online 20% coupon, get free shipping or $20 off on the Google checkout and get some new goggles... These things don't last forever!! Sheesh... :
post #14 of 19
I only use goggles when it's snowing. How can I avoid wiping them when wet?
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
I only use goggles when it's snowing. How can I avoid wiping them when wet?
Outside of goggles OK. We're talkin' about the inside surfaces,
post #16 of 19
Gotcha, thanks.
post #17 of 19
but platinum and exterior coatings can wear off from your thumb too, that can drive me nuts. i firmly believe that multiple lenses/goggles is the way to go. i even ride with an old spare in my pocket on storm days. I've had to give them to fogged up partners
the way I see it, you spend thousands on skis and boots, why shouldn't vision count?
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well I learned my lesson....never touch the inside of the lense without that crazy gray cloth. I got the pink iridium lens....it seems quite versital, i'll let everyone know how they are.
post #19 of 19
congrats, now buy a second lens please for snowy days. Or- absolutely refrain from wiping the snow off the exterior with your thumb. That iridium does scratch off after repeated wipes. though will never result in horribly intolerable visibility, just irritating little scratches.
it sucks that we have to take such anal care of our goggles. In the end, if they're treated right, they should last you several seasons.
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