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Stopping the Slide?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
This isn't your typical post and I'm not one to shy away from asking.

I was heading down a fairly steep black the other day when I fell and ended up sliding down about 150 feet on my left hip before I planted with my right pole and pushed myself up. I did not want my skis to fall off, so I refrained from burying my edges into the mtn. Not sure what I could of done different and I guess I probably was not thinking clear at the moment. Of course, I hope this never happens to me again, but if it does and you have a general technique, I would really appreciate it.

The great thing was that I was right underneath a chair lift and heard someone say "he finally stopped". Little embarassing, but I was just glad it was not a crowded hill where I could of ran into someone else.

I searched historical threads and not sure if this was covered, if anyone can point me to the link or let me know if there is a proper technique, I would appreciate it.

Thanks
post #2 of 16
this may not be fully appropriate, but can be depending on the slope and the conditions. It's called a self-arrest. If you have control of your poles, grasp the pole with one hand just above the tip and the other higher up on the pole, maybe two feet from the other hand. As you slide down, dig the pole into the snow above you - this does assume your head is above your feet as you slide and that you have been able to maneuver onto your stomach. By exerting pressure downward on the tip of the pole, you will start creating a trench in the snow as you slide, the friction helping to slow you. Taking care to avoid catching an edge with the skis and potentially twisting and/or injuring your legs, keep the skis off the snow if you can. There will undoubtedly be better explanations of this move, but the general idea is here. Try looking up self arrest and see how it may be detailed.
post #3 of 16
There was a discussion on self-arrest and it's effectiveness not too long ago here: http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=44239
post #4 of 16
schanfm nailed it, search self arrest for previous discussions, but the answer above is pretty much it. I would hold at the grip and right above the basket.

Thanks KevinF for finding the link.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
There was a discussion on self-arrest and it's effectiveness not too long ago here: http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=44239
Thanks KevinF. I had a chance just now to read through the entire thread and the website that was posted. Great information.

So, if I understood all of this correctly. You want to flip to your stomach, drop one pole, and take the other one by the basket and jam it into the snow/ice as hard as you can. Also, use your boots or ski edges in addition depending on if you lost them or not.

I hope to never have to try this, but just having different techniques in the back of your mind would be useful to all skiers!
post #6 of 16
I've used the self arrest method several times. It works fairly well. You can start it with your head downhill and when you dig in that pole tip your whole body will rotate around so that your feet are downhill.
post #7 of 16

Self Arrest

Coyote27.

I disagree strongly with the First grab your pole above the basket and dig it in.

#1 If you are a big guy and traveling at a good pace and/or are on a very steep hill, you can grab your pole and push it into the slope and proceed very quickly to a} bend your pole b) break it if it's graphite c) lose it d) proceed quickly down and down.

The right self arrest technique:

1. IMMEDIATELY (THIS IS THE KEY on Steep Hills)

2. Get on your chest/stomach with your feet/skis downhill

3. Dig in with feet/boots/ski's and stop

The KEY is to do this immediately don't wait to see if you'll stop because if you don't stop you will be picking up speed right away and then it will be even harder to stop.

You car AUGER IN (grab pole above basket and force the tip into snow) but this isn't a recommended self arrest technique. I is used to stabilize yourself on a very steep and usually icy spot or traverse that you have to madke to reach that powder chute over there. When there b lue ice and boulders below augering in I do very well.

Arrest technique in the steeps- Think RIGHT NOW if you ski the steeps alot this should be automatic reaction, sort of like "don't open your mouth when falling into deep powder".
post #8 of 16
Does anyone have experience with self-arrest whippets? I've been thinking about buying a pair for a couple of years now, but have always been loth to ski with something sharp sticking out from my pole.
post #9 of 16
Not wanting to engage the ski edges because they might come off .. ?? :

That's like not putting the gear down on your airplane when you land so you can save on tire wear. :
post #10 of 16
What Pete said!
post #11 of 16
My long uncontrolable slides were when I used skinnier skis, and that's when I began using ski pole self arrest which I still use pretty much whenever I fall just for practice.

My current skis are still narrower (at the waist) than my boots, which can cause problems using them to arrest a slide (boot out).

If Pete or others can self- arrest without poles, good for them. I will be using my pole and skis. I think the pole can only help, as I push my body up, the edge angle of the skis will decrease, making them more likely to stop my slide (less chance of boot out).
post #12 of 16
Any self arrest pointers for Rasta:
http://media.putfile.com/One-skier-down
post #13 of 16
Nice video TDK.

I'm in the use the pole camp. I doubt you will find any steep camps or patrol that will teach not to use your pole. Use your feet and skis if it really isn't steep, but practice with a pole, and the sooner you get your pole in the snow the better.

By the way, Rasta would have stopped right away if he had used one of his poles.
post #14 of 16
Unable to see video, probably due to my low speed connection. But I wanted to quote a true life trip report from tgr, that explains why I prefer a pole self-arrest.

"I pushed myself off the slope with my hands, putting my weight on my boot tips: the Giles Green self-arrest... They dug into the snow. Too much... I was flipped over, somersaulting backwards"

the complete trip report is here
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
Unable to see video, probably due to my low speed connection. But I wanted to quote a true life trip report from tgr, that explains why I prefer a pole self-arrest.

"I pushed myself off the slope with my hands, putting my weight on my boot tips: the Giles Green self-arrest... They dug into the snow. Too much... I was flipped over, somersaulting backwards"

the complete trip report is here
Too bad you cannot see the video because you would have enjoyed it . Good story, Punte Victoria.... I love happy endings, especially that one.

I dont have much experiance sliding uncontrolled down the mountain. That happend to me once but I had no time to untangle the straps. Even if I had managed I dont understand how the heck I would have managed to keep them in my hands at that speed and with snow spraying and myself flying over bumps. Rasta had that same problem but he was sort of slipping into unconciousness probably from the hard blow he got after he got up on his leggs and fell down. You can see how he hits his face in a bump.... uuuuuhhhh .
post #16 of 16
TDK, do not untangle the straps. Hold onto the grip of one pole and grab just above the basket with the other hand. Both poles can remain strapped to your wrists. You will be able to hold onto the pole, don't worry about that. Rasta's problem was not that he couldn't hold onto his poles for self-arrest, it was his ignorance of the technique.
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