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Advanced female skier needs new skis.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am an advanced female (almost expert) skier who needs new skis. I am interested in an all-terrain and carving ski that can handle powder, ice, and everything in between. These skis need to be able to handle speed, as I am on the quick side.

Keeping in mind that I am 5'7 and have an athletic build (average weight), can you suggest anything?
post #2 of 20
If you are more into off-piste, crud and trees vs on-piste carving try Head Mojo 90 or Head Sweet Fat Thang (women's top sheet on the same ski). This skis are OK on ice and excellent on everything else, they are lightweight, but stable at speed.
post #3 of 20
where do you ski, and what kind of powder depths are we talking about? I'd try and narrow down the range of dimensions/waist you're looking at first, and go from there, hopefully with some demos so you can figure out what you like. (good boots are assumed)

First thought though was the K2 lotta luv, the women's version of the recon with a 78mm waist and something like a 15m radius at the length you'd be looking at. I'm pretty fickle though, the atomic metron m:ex is my new favorite ski that seems to be a good all-around performer, and it can hold an edge better than any k2's I've tried.
post #4 of 20
You'll diffinetly need to check out the Volkl Attiva line Ski Press had great things to say about them.
post #5 of 20
Are you out West or in the East? If you're out West listen to me if you're in the East plug your ears :

My wife is your size and aggressiveness and she likes wider, longer skis that are fairly soft longitudinally (for absorbing terrain at speed) for all terrain from pow to ice.

Her favorite is the 1st generation K2 Phat Luv in a 174cm...pretty much the same ski as the Axis AK Launcher that was out a few years ago...either can be found on eBay pretty cheap. She really hauls butt on that ski and it seems plenty quick and controlled on the hard stuff.

I would think a ski like the elan 777 (176cm) or the mojo90/sweet fat thang (176? might too ski short) would be great too. Volkl Karma might be good.

If you prefer a little more beef and shape to your skis perhaps the Head Monster 88 (175cm).

What are you skiing now and how do you like it?
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
I ski East mainly and am not sure if a "fat ski" would be appropriate.
post #7 of 20
[quote=katedickie;614989] all-terrain and carving ski that can handle powder, ice, and everything in between. These skis need to be able to handle speed, as I am on the quick side.
quote]

This sounds like just about anything BUT a soft Phat powder ski. One word in that description might suggest a powder specific ski, everything else suggests another choice. A far more versatile choice would be a mid fat in the range of 74-84 (ish) mm wide.

Specific areas of excellence of a soft, 95mm powder ski.

all terrain.......No
carving..........No
Powder.........Yes
Ice...............No, No, No
Speed...........Fair for some skiers horrible for others
Quick............No

Specific areas of excellence of a good mid fat.

All terrain..............Yes
Carving.................Yes
Powder.................Fair for 6"-8" or so
Ice.......................Yes
Speed...................Yes
Quick....................Yes

SJ
post #8 of 20
Definitely look at the Volkl Attiva line...maybe the Queen Attiva would be the best to handle a little powder and trees.
post #9 of 20
I have a ton of volkls and would easily recomend a volkl but not something in the attiva line for an aggressive skier.

I'd say go for the allstar in the volkl line or .........follow my lead here.
Trust me!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
A far more versatile choice would be a mid fat in the range of 74-84 (ish) mm wide.
Exactly. Lotta luv=78, M:ex=84, lots of other makes & models in between that would be a great (more fun on-piste) choice if you're not in powder all the time. Honestly I think the Queen Attiva isn't the right choice for a do-it-all ski - the AC3 might be worth trying though, in addition to others in this width range.
post #11 of 20
If you buy a "one ski does it all type of all mtn. ski" you will get a ski that will do nothing good. Just everything OK.

Buy a good supercarve ski for your east hard packed "AKA Ice" conditions. A good supercarve race type ski in about a 17 meter radius will do you great. 17m radius is not as quick as a slalom ski but quicker than a GS ski. I just got the Fischer WC RC. That is an awesome ski. You would want about a 165 CM. I got 180cm and am a 40 year racing vertan and weigh 210 lbs. This ski is totally stable at 50 mph, and at any time you can crank 'em to a level that you wouldn't believe. Most all race ski manufactuers make them, they are a supercarve ski, some people call then a cheater ski because they turn so well. 17 meter radius is the key. Demo a pair, you will love them.

Then get yourself a mid fat powder/crud ski for fresh snow days.

Buy the ski you need the most first. Then save for the other. This way you will get all conditions covered and be skiing on a ski that does it great. Not a little bit of everything good. Don't let them talk you into an all mtn ski. You are an up and coming agressive skiier. Get a ski that will make you ski better. Try a pair of the supercarve race skis. You can handle them just dandy. Go Girl! Try a pair and let me know what you think via PM.
post #12 of 20
Flame, I agree that it is more desirable to have different skis for different tasks, but not everyone is (financially) able to do that. I started out with a midfat so I could go everywhere comfortably on the mountain. As money became available, I filled in with a carver and a fat ski. I think a midfat for this skier could have the same results and allow her to go everywhere now, and determine the gaps later on. Likely, any ski she picks without demo'ing at this point won't be the be all/ end all ski if she keeps it up seriously anyway. I still say a 76-84waist will be a good all purpose choice and will still be useful later on in the quiver. This is my female/aggressive skier opinion.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawnhill View Post
Flame, I agree that it is more desirable to have different skis for different tasks, but not everyone is (financially) able to do that. I started out with a midfat so I could go everywhere comfortably on the mountain. As money became available, I filled in with a carver and a fat ski. I think a midfat for this skier could have the same results and allow her to go everywhere now, and determine the gaps later on. Likely, any ski she picks without demo'ing at this point won't be the be all/ end all ski if she keeps it up seriously anyway. I still say a 76-84waist will be a good all purpose choice and will still be useful later on in the quiver. This is my female/aggressive skier opinion.
Still, as I said before, buy a one ski does it all ski and you will get a ski that does nothing really well. You can buy used crud/new snow skis all day long for $150 with binders. They have been the hottest selling type of ski for years. Pick up a used pair of soft snow skis, heck you don't even need sharp edges for soft snow. I still say spend the $ on a good pair of supercarve skis. In the east most of the conditions are hard anyway. That is where you need good edges. The new race technolgy is unbelievable. Have you tried a pair? I really believe for her and most people, a 17 M radius offers the most fun.

Just my 2 cents. Thanks for yours but I respectfully disagree. I just bought a pair of 178 cm I think used Bandit twos (AKA Bandaids) to use as rock skis this year. Pd $150 for them and they ski pretty darn good. In my opinion they are one of the better mid fat skis. They do OK but that is it. If you go to a fatter ski, such as the Bandit three, then you really lose the hard pack ability altogether.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flame View Post
I still say spend the $ on a good pair of supercarve skis. In the east most of the conditions are hard anyway. That is where you need good edges. The new race technolgy is unbelievable. Have you tried a pair?
Yes, I tried a pair and bought a pair of carving skis. They are a ton of fun, fast, high g-force, but not so fun in the bowls with any kind of powder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flame View Post
Thanks for yours but I respectfully disagree.
That's fine. The woman here is looking for opinions, not the answer! Nobody but she will ultimately make the decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flame View Post
I just bought a pair of 178 cm I think used Bandit twos to use as rock skis this year. In my opinion they are one of the better mid fat skis. They do OK but that is it .
I liked the Bandits also and are quite suitable to get a skier out enjoying all conditions immediately, which seems to be the objective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flame View Post
If you go to a fatter ski, such as the Bandit three, then you really lose the hard pack ability altogether.
If you keep it to serve you just on powder days that's not so much of a problem!

Flame, I'm really not looking to take issue with you. Just giving advice as a female skier who was in a similar situation as the OP last season. There was no way I could afford dropping even a few hundred dollars on another set of skis, but I wanted to ski the bowls and extreme terrain along with frontside stuff on the way out while still having a decent time. Again, katedickie is probably astute enough to figure out exactly what kind suits her needs and her budget.
post #15 of 20
I spend a lot of time testing skis and just spent a day last week testing about 20 different skis including some middle priced men's skis, women's expert skis, and a few men's expert models. I can say without doubt, that a woman would have to be REALLY strong, fast, aggressive and just plain good to need more ski than the very top women's stuff. Two absolutely top notch models were the Volkl Attiva AC-3 and the Nordica Olympia Conquer. Both of these grip very well and lay down on the snow like a nice GS board. Another really good model is the Nordica Olympia Victory that is just a tich more forgiving than the other two.

My co-worker Katherine and I spend a lot of time on snow together and she is of a similar opinion. She is 5-9 (150#) 25 y/o ex college ballplayer who personally skis on a Nordica Modified in a 162 when we are not testing skis. She says that she would be equally happy on either the AC-3 or the Conquer if she didn't have her Mods.

BTW: There is a notable difference in the feel of the Volkls and the Nordies. The Volkls are stiffer underfoot and you can feel a little lag in the flex until the speed picks up. Then, it tends to grip very hard and pull from the tip. The Nordies tend to flex more in the middle of the ski so the initial feel is that the ski is gripping underfoot, but is not pulling from the tip as much. The ultimate grip is about the same between the two brands but they just feel a little different.

SJ
post #16 of 20
SierraJim,
My wife has finally consented to retire her well loved Volkl G3s and I was looking at the Attiva AC3s as a replacement. We live in CO, ski all conditions. Sound's like you liked them. She would not be happy with too demanding a ski, but having said that she skis quite well and has 20 years on snow.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesmith7 View Post
SierraJim,
My wife has finally consented to retire her well loved Volkl G3s and I was looking at the Attiva AC3s as a replacement. We live in CO, ski all conditions. Sound's like you liked them. She would not be happy with too demanding a ski, but having said that she skis quite well and has 20 years on snow.

Well........it IS a demanding ski and takes either some muscle and, or speed to get the ski to start bending at first. If she is light, it might not be the right thing and the Nordie Victory mught be a better (easier) choice.

Here is an interesting thing about stiff skis..........

A skier who typically slides the ski up on edge, (like a feet together type) may actually like a stiff ski just fine. The stiff ski skids smoothly and feels very good as it slides toward it's grip point in the turn (typically say 4:00 or so). Also, a "go-rilla" skier who mashes the ski early in the turn and then rides the front of the boot, may like a stiff ski as well.

OTH....A skier who tips the ski up earlier in the turn relies on the flex of the ski to start the pressure at the extremities may feel the stiff ski lag at first. If that type of skier is expecting the ski to flex and start to hook up at say (1:00 or 1:30) they may actually feel that the stiff ski is somewhat reluctant to come around.

So........as contradictory as this may sound, a more efficient skier may like a somewhat softer ski than a slider or a muscle skier, even though the efficient skier is probably a better skier than the other two types.

SJ
post #18 of 20
Thanks for the input, demos are certainly called for.
She's not really a lightweight (140ish) and always seems to not like too soft a ski.
I think your description of the first type describes her style best.

Steve
post #19 of 20
Katedickie,

See my latest reviews here: http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/showthread.php?t=554

Then go demo!!
Kris
post #20 of 20
I've skied with this girl and on my best day I have to really point it to keep up with her...
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