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scariest lifts in the world - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Another vote for the Red Dog chair. Crossing that ravine is a nightmare on a windy day - when the chair is tilting sideways.
post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by worldfishnski:
And after seeing the mangled chairs and the pieces of chairs strewn under Marte this last July, you would really be scared.
Well...the parts belong of the tower wiped down by avalanches BEFORE the concrete V shaped reinforcements were put in place .

AFTER , there wasn´t any problems , but just looking at the bunker size reinforcements , can scare you bad!
The good news is (as you know) the great bowls and chutes that the marte lift opens.
In a powder day ,it´s like heli-skiing from a lift.
post #33 of 56
I have to agree with AltaSkier--the first chairlift is the scariest. Second for me was my first chair lift ride with my son. He was four and completely at ease. It was a low, slow chair and I had a firm hold on him but it was still unnerving for me. Something about the combination of those short legs and nylon ski pants that put me on edge. :
post #34 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by extreme veteran:
1st prize
I don´t thing anything can be scarier than the FORD V8 from 1950 powered contraption in CHACALTALLA , Bolivia .
It´s a steel cable going very fast , you just hook a steel ¨anchor¨attached to a knotted rope ( that doubles as lift ticket )
I could go up after falling only three times , stablishing a new foreigner record of lift proficiency.

This is in the Club Andino Boliviano ( a small and friedly , but primitive ski club ) in the highest lift served area in the world (5400m =17000 feet aprox).
I swear I saw a condor flying DOWN of the ski slope !!!!
.
I remember reading an article in one of the ski magazines back in the late 80's about Chacaltalla (I think), Bolivia. One of the funniest ski stories I ever read - the author was explaining in detail the excruciating headaches and nausea that everyone was experiencing on the crazy bus ride up to the area, and when finally arriving everyone was physically sick enough from the altitude not to even want to try skiing. The author was invited for a run with the resort manager but halfway up the lift he (or she) dropped out, excusing themself and saying they just wanted to find a place to die.

Whenever i'm having a bad ski day, I just think back on that article and... laugh!
post #35 of 56
I agree with you Julie sbout having to put ropes back on the pullies after people don't do it themselves. & it is soooo easy when you know how.

But if a rope tow has a little drop in before it heads up the hill they can run at really fast speeds & still be easy to get on.

There is never a boring day at a field where there is a nut cracker. I love club fields.

Ben

No rope tows here in Japan though.
post #36 of 56
I definitely agree Ben. The best nutcracker layour is at Mt Olympus where you can ride four lifts one after the other without stopping. Also if you ask them nicely they will crank the 3rd tow up to full speed so you can get air just before the unloading platform.

But if simply riding nutcrackers isn't enough try taking a patrol sled up with you. I've done it at Temple Basin when the unloading platform hadn't been dug out fully, so when you get off you have to quickly lock your edges across the hill so you don't get dragged back down the lift line by the weight of the toboggan. (and the lift towers are not padded).

I also know a patroller who knocked over a lift tower when the handle of his sled hit a pulley directly and got jammed between the rope and the pulley. The movement of the rope twisted the tower 90 degrees then dragged it up the hill a few metres. The carnage was quite impressive but no-one was hurt.
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by AltaSkier:
My vote goes for the first chair you ever rode. Doesn't matter where, when or how high it was, because it still was the highest, scariest chair you ever rode.
Ya, I hear ya Alta, but may I add "by yourself" : . In the 60's, no computers told the lifts to shut down cause of wind, human eye & scars were the first sign. The thing would just run and run no matter if your head was being ripped off. I'll never forget SMASHING into like most of lift towers at Stowe, three blankets & frostbite, not even the Canadians were skiing, I was like 5 or 6 when I was boarding that GD single, some people have fond memories, "oh it's history" It was sick, DUDE...but coool, almost as fun as the skiing.

[flash back] thanks :

Later, I'll tell you about the Germans in St. Moritz & lifts, tooo many beers right then & wow. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #38 of 56
Ahh, Chacaltaya. The highest lift-served ski area in the world.

I wrote a story about this unique spot. Check it out at:

www.telemarktips.com

Look under "Feature Stories."

Well worth a trip if you are ever in Bolivia.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by kiwiski:


But if simply riding nutcrackers isn't enough try taking a patrol sled up with you. I've done it at Temple Basin when the unloading platform hadn't been dug out fully, so when you get off you have to quickly lock your edges across the hill so you don't get dragged back down the lift line by the weight of the toboggan. (and the lift towers are not padded).
THe olympus layout is quite good. A lot of folks don't like that second tow where there is the fast double pully, seems to freak them out a bit. Up at Mt Lyford the rope tow that they've got there is their newer basin is the best I've ever seen. You start in a small rise & go down the slope 10 metres putting the nut cracker on before the rope heads up the hill. There isn't a pully at the bottom to worry about either.

Taboggans aren't much fun on a rope tow though, we uysed to stop the lift if it wasn't empty, made it a lot nicer. As long as you've got an over mit things aren't too bad, does wonders for your hand & arm strength after a few days at a club field.
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Powkeg:
The Mount Perisher Double Chair at Perisher Blue is the scariest piece of work I have experienced. It is always breaking down, if only one person is on it they must sit on the left hand side to keep it balanced and if it stops while running and is pretty full the bouncing has to be seen to be believed. Thin self locking chain for safety as well. It is by far the worst lift I have been on.
ditto. the amount of times I have been on that chairlift in whiteout (not from sow, but wind) wondering "when the [naughty word] are they going to close this done" is infinite. and boy does it bounce when it stops. :
post #41 of 56
My vote would have to go to the old Silver Queen Chair in Crested Butte. In the old days the Siver Queen would make its way up International and would seem to always stop at the highest point. It would stop and then begin bouncing. When you are 8 and 9 years old and this lift stars bouncing it scared the **** out of you.
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Mazarei:
Ahh, Chacaltaya. The highest lift-served ski area in the world.

I wrote a story about this unique spot. Check it out at:

www.telemarktips.com

Look under "Feature Stories."

Well worth a trip if you are ever in Bolivia.
First congratulations for this great thread.

I want to reply to cheap seats( you will be called ASIENTOS BARATOS here) also :

You have been there for a day or read about chacaltalla ( or chacaltaya as nobody knows how to spell quechua or aymara words).
Believe it or not, I skied there more than 10 times.

I was working in a transportation project developed by an argentine company I used to work for .
I spent months in Bolivia with nothing to do but work ...and skiing the sundays in chacaltalla.
I´m even honorary member of the ski club (the only non resident ever).
One funny story :There was a group of nice german girls that almost fainted from the altitude sickness, I suggested coca leaves tea .
The indian lady that usually prepared the tea at the (so called)clubhouse was boiling the water and I asked if it was hot enough .Then I submerged my hand in the boiling water and pronounced the water perfect.

The girls look at me like I was the Terminator or something .

The trick is that at Chacaltalla altitude the water boils at a much lower temperature (more like shower water) and you can do it.
post #43 of 56
My scariest ride I was on is the Vallugabahn in St Christoph, Austria. This is a 11 person cable car with about a 3500' drop to the valley floor. The sensation of this tram is one of riding in your own coffin. But when the ride is over the views were spectactular.
post #44 of 56
This far in the thread and nobody has mentioned the Castlerock Chair (Although it has now been replaced).
post #45 of 56
Especially if that first chair you ever rode was at Alta! I seem to recall chairlifts that appeared to be constructed using old telephone poles as lift towers. Any of those Western lifts without safety bars is frightening, particularly to a parent.
post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Ben Ferg:
THe olympus layout is quite good. A lot of folks don't like that second tow where there is the fast double pully, seems to freak them out a bit. Up at Mt Lyford the rope tow that they've got there is their newer basin is the best I've ever seen. You start in a small rise & go down the slope 10 metres putting the nut cracker on before the rope heads up the hill. There isn't a pully at the bottom to worry about either.
I've never been to Lyford but the most fun nutcracker I have found is the first lift at Craigieburn, I wasn't expecting the bend in it the first time I rode it but getting flung around the drum is really fun. The hardest loading platform is the mid-load of the rugby lift at Broken River, a decent uphill slope and about 15m before the first pulley means you have to get the grab and flick perfect otherwise you get to the first pulley unattached. :
post #47 of 56
Good to see many old handles still here.

Scariest??? My suburban heading back up hwy. 6 to the divide!!!
post #48 of 56
The OLD original chair at Aspen Highlands, had about 5 towers before it went over the huge peak to peak valley, then about 5 more pickup towers on the rock peak before the unload. & those little fake packs lashed on the back of chairs w/rope ladder !!
Any one remember that?

How about I think, Terry peak in South Dakota?
post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by NewHampie:
Does anyone remember years ago at Mt. Sunapee there was a spot where 2 chairlifts crossed and the upper one must have been 80 feet high. I remember there was a net somewhere to protect skiers on the lower lift from falling debris but it didn't look like it would be much help if you fell.
I remember that!! Went to a couple of races there when i was a kid. that chair was always the high light going to a race at sunapee!! How are things in Lyman?? I worked on a couple of dairy farms in piermont back in the late 80's. Pretty area!!
post #50 of 56
If you want to see a photograph of the MARTE LIFT and the map of LAS LENAS see

http://club.telepolis.com/nieve/lenasm.htm
post #51 of 56
I'm Not 100% sure but ...

Remember that book "Alive" It was a bout a plane that crashed in the andes and the survivors resorted to cannablism to survive. they made a movie about it too. I think the crash site is about three miles from las lenas!! If i've got the right ski area then this lift sounds fitting for the area!!
post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Skid Jackson:
I'm Not 100% sure but ...

Remember that book "Alive" It was a bout a plane that crashed in the andes and the survivors resorted to cannablism to survive. they made a movie about it too. I think the crash site is about three miles from las lenas!! If i've got the right ski area then this lift sounds fitting for the area!!
Everybody knows that Argentina is famous for the quality of the meat BUT NOT THAT KIND !!

Anyway , you actually can see the sun flash in the aluninium body of that plane on clear days if you climb a little from the top of the alredy world famous marte lift .
If the uruguayan rugby players had walked into argentina instead of going west to chile , they would have been having tea with cakes and a warm bed within 6 hours .
Of course they couldn't have know that , specially coming from a country without mountains nor snow.

But believe me, I have skied there every year and I NEVER !! ate anybody ( just tried unsuccesfully to bite some of the more tasty girls).
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by kiwiski:
But if simply riding nutcrackers isn't enough try taking a patrol sled up with you. I've done it at Temple Basin when the unloading platform hadn't been dug out fully, so when you get off you have to quickly lock your edges across the hill so you don't get dragged back down the lift line by the weight of the toboggan. (and the lift towers are not padded).

I also know a patroller who knocked over a lift tower when the handle of his sled hit a pulley directly and got jammed between the rope and the pulley. The movement of the rope twisted the tower 90 degrees then dragged it up the hill a few metres. The carnage was quite impressive but no-one was hurt.
I was at Craigieburn the day the new CAST IRON firebox got transported up the hill via a rope tow, the new day hutt is halfway up the slopes. No fancy equipment here for getting anything heavy up the hill, no snow cats or snow mobiles. You either carry it up, or pull it up on a sledge. Now that required some skill.......click below to see photo

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid41/p28486b518802ae85c795fd40876829a4/fcf830 c2.jpg

[ December 04, 2002, 08:27 PM: Message edited by: julie from nz ]
post #54 of 56
That may be the case in winter, but they still have the County & landcruser in summer.

It was a pity that it wasn't finished before the season, but then it wouldn't be a club field. Where the general term for things is work in progress.

Good pic for sure though. I bet that thing weighed a few kg (like in the area of 20 to 40).

Ben
post #55 of 56
Ben

I even took some avi of it but that is too big to post. I'd hate to think how heavy it was. Definitely adds to the charm of the place, makes you realise how devoted the staff and members are to keep a place like this going. Has become my favourite place to ski now I am based in CHC, although I have to venture south occasionally for my Treble Cone fix.
post #56 of 56
The new day lodge at Craigieburn does make it a bit more atractive. Also it was a good season there last year. Lets face it the terrain to be had is better than most.

One of my worse nights saw a group of us climb to the biv at the
top in late may & then ski down the next day. Only got half way down before the rocks got a bit much for the rock hoppers though.

Ben
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