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NEW MEMBER with gear questions. thanks!!!

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

This is my first post, i would like some advice on my current equitment.

My current skis are volkl energy 220 with motion m10 bindings, both bought new in 04 i belive.

My boots were bought the same time, they are nordica w10's.

I have only used my stuff about 12 times or so in this time.

I was told my w10 boots were nice and stiff, i weighed 230lbs at the time, now im about 215. so my boots i love, but the skis, im not sure about.

When i carve hard, i have popped out of the bindings and fell, all because i popped out!!
Is that just the bindings, they were tuned to me being an advanced begginer, but maybe because im a physicaly strong person (lots of years under barbells and dumbbells) i over powered the settings?

Or are the skies not good enough?

Also, i did not ski at all last winter and my metal edges have alittle rust, should i have them tunned up?

Thanks everyone i would really like some help on this.

Mark

edit: also my ski's are 177 in length. thanks
post #2 of 33
I think that you need to post the binding setting. Take a look at the toe and heel and you should see a little marker that lines up with some numbers?
post #3 of 33
Thread Starter 
The back ones on the heel say "7" and the fronts look to be a tad lower then "7" almost looks like "6.5"

Hope that helps. thank you
post #4 of 33
Thread Starter 
Anyone that can help? thank you.
post #5 of 33
i'm not sure but since you're a "heavier than average person" (not fat lol) those setting should be a bit higher especially on m10's which i assume are intermediate bindings so they have a soft spring probably and thats why they are popping out. Just for comparison, i use Look p10 (3-10din) and i'm 150lbs and my din's are at 8, because i'm very advanced and i don't want my ski popping out for no reason.

So since you weigh 70 lbs more than me but are a beginner/intemrediate you should have your din around 8-9 OR get higher DIN bindings
post #6 of 33
I"m 165 lbs. My DIN release setting is 7.5.

The levels I, II, and III are for how you ski and how much risk of injury from non-release you are willing to accept. If you are "carving hard" you should not have it set for a level I skier, imho.

Also consider technique. If you are trying to twist your feet around, or push your feet sideways, you will come out of your bindings. The only strong forces you should be applying to your skis should be perpendicular to the plane of the ski base, i.e. down through them.
post #7 of 33
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys,

They are numbered thru 10.
so maybe switch them to 8 or 9?
They do come off almost everytime i fall, and when i am going fast and turn hard is when they have popped off.
Maybe im intermediate, i can make my way down a double black diamond but not with alot of grace. mostly skidding sideways and jump turning lol.

Anyway, is this something i should have someone do for me, and should i have my skis sharpened due to the slight rust. what does a tune up cost on avg?

thanks alot for the help everyone.
post #8 of 33
Here is a chart that a professional might use. http://ski.terrymorse.com/din.html

If you don't have a clue what your doing, you had best have a professional not only set your release value and forward pressure, but also check that the bindings are in fact releasing at their indicated value. Remember that the release is to try and minimize the risk of breaking your leg, and that it is quite possible to force the bindings off in some other directions at what will seem like very low force settings. It sounds like your technique is at fault; landing jumps with sideways pressure should kick your boots out of the bindings.
post #9 of 33
Thread Starter 
Thanks ghost,

I have only popped out like 3 times or so when i shouldent have, any other time was due to a fall, which is ok with me.

You are right about me not knowing really anything about my skis, but i joined here to learn lol.

I plan on going skiing soon so ill get them checked, thanks.
post #10 of 33
do you know what part of the binding you came out of, as in front or back?
post #11 of 33
Thread Starter 
HMM, well i think both at once, but if i had to pick one, id say the back one. why do you ask philt?

thanks, mark
post #12 of 33
Take your skis to shop (and your boots) and get re-evaluated for your DIN. They will also do a binding release check for you.
post #13 of 33
Binding pre-releasing is very dangerous and you can be hurt very easily. With the current state of very safe bindings being manufactured pre-relaseing is one of the most common reasons for injuries. Worst case scenario is when you are making a turn near the edge of the run, you get a pre-release and befor you know it you just smached into a tree or lift tower.

I hate it when my binders pre-release. The best binding for anyone is one that has DIN range that will put your own DIN setting in the middle of the range that the binding has. IE: If your Din setting is 8 then you want a binging that goes form like 4 to 12. If you are a bigger, heavier, more aggressive skiier and your DIN setting is 8 then I would get like a 5 to 14 DIN range set of bindings. If your bindings only go up to 10 then they might be a little short in the available DIN range but could still be OK for you.

I and 6', weigh 210 and ski very aggressively (ex-racer/still race businessman's league). I ski a binder with a range of 6 to 17 and I set it to 8 for free skiing and 10 for racing.

DIN settings are a combination of Height, weight, ability, level of agressive skiing done and boot sole length. The longer the boot the higher the DIN setting required due to the mechanical advange the longer boot has in making the binder release.

Crank your DIN up a bit and see if you are still coming out. If so get new binders.
post #14 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flame View Post
The longer the boot the higher the DIN setting required due to the mechanical advange the longer boot has in making the binder release.

Crank your DIN up a bit and see if you are still coming out. If so get new binders.
Actually, the longer the boot, the lower the DIN setting should be. Smaller people with very small boots often have higher DIN settings than the big boys. The length of most boots is imprinted on the side of the sole, ususally near the heel and is given in millimeters. If you have a size 10, the boot length is probably in the 305 to 320 range. Your weight, height, age and skier level are also needed to estimate a DIN setting. If you will post that information, we can be more accurate. Any skier needs to understand how this information works, and should be able to set their own bindings. A release check by the shop tells you if the interfact between the boot and binding is working as it is supposed to.

Check in at the maintenance and tuning section, and you'll get set up with all the tuning advise and equipment.
post #15 of 33
Thread Starter 
My boots say 30.0 and under that they say 30.5....i wear size 13-14 street shoes.

On a side note, my boots have adjustable flex, for hard or soft, mine are set to hard it looks like, what do you guys run yours at, ive never adj anything.
post #16 of 33
MNSki, if you look at the small print along the side of the sole, you willl see a number like 335 or 340. That is the real length of the sole in millimeters. Report that number, your age, skier type, weight and height and I can tell you the "recommended" DIN setting.

As far as the boot, it is a Nordica Beast series W10 and has a flex adjustment. I don't own the boot, but would guess most high end skiers would ski that in the stiff position most of the time, possibly softening the adjustment for powder, hucks and bumps. The Beast is a fairly roomy boot and you have one that matches your shoe size. I'd guess its a bit too large, especially if it has had a chance to pack out. You most likely belong in a 29.5 size. Obviously I'm not in a position to judge. Assuming you have a secure fit that olds your heel and forefoot and does not remove your toenails, it may be ideal.

Binding seittings are completely unrelated. If you have experienced a pre-release, increasing hte setting by 1/2 din is probably OK. If you are more than one setting over your recommended level, there may be binding problems like forward pressure adjustments that should be looked at or technique issues. Sort that out, and if necessary increase DIN according to your need. If you are advanced enough to require binding adjustments for skill, you should be knowledgable enough to understand the technical issues pertaining to bindings. That is not meant as an insult, but many people who have to crank up their bindings to stay in them have techinque issues that would be a better solution. OTOH you may be performing manuvers that place a high shock on your bindings, like jumping or high speeds on rough hard snow. An expert'sr needs in binding adjustments may change from day to day, and it would be good to understand why and when adjustments should be performed.
post #17 of 33
Not to steal attention from MNski but, I have a similar question about my DIN settings on my current skis and my brothers skis. My boots are 305mm, I am 21, level II, 150 pounds or so and 5'8". The settings have not been checked in a while and am just wondering if they are where they should be. They are a bit under 6(I would guess, 5.75).


My brothers boots are 311mm, he is 25, level II, 165 pounds and 5'10". His settings are currently at 6.


Note that neither of us have ever popped out of our skis when just skiing. The bindings have released when we needed them too.(AKA...during accidents) In light of this, I am guessing that the settings are still where they should be. Just wondering since we are improving in skill. Thanks
post #18 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
MNSki, if you look at the small print along the side of the sole, you willl see a number like 335 or 340. That is the real length of the sole in millimeters. Report that number, your age, skier type, weight and height and I can tell you the "recommended" DIN setting.

As far as the boot, it is a Nordica Beast series W10 and has a flex adjustment. I don't own the boot, but would guess most high end skiers would ski that in the stiff position most of the time, possibly softening the adjustment for powder, hucks and bumps. The Beast is a fairly roomy boot and you have one that matches your shoe size. I'd guess its a bit too large, especially if it has had a chance to pack out. You most likely belong in a 29.5 size. Obviously I'm not in a position to judge. Assuming you have a secure fit that olds your heel and forefoot and does not remove your toenails, it may be ideal.

Binding seittings are completely unrelated. If you have experienced a pre-release, increasing hte setting by 1/2 din is probably OK. If you are more than one setting over your recommended level, there may be binding problems like forward pressure adjustments that should be looked at or technique issues. Sort that out, and if necessary increase DIN according to your need. If you are advanced enough to require binding adjustments for skill, you should be knowledgable enough to understand the technical issues pertaining to bindings. That is not meant as an insult, but many people who have to crank up their bindings to stay in them have techinque issues that would be a better solution. OTOH you may be performing manuvers that place a high shock on your bindings, like jumping or high speeds on rough hard snow. An expert'sr needs in binding adjustments may change from day to day, and it would be good to understand why and when adjustments should be performed.
Thank you for this info,

My boots are 345mm and they are w10 nordica and they say energy driver and shock eraser and hp slide in on the boot. also says thermo custom fit and precission fit.

Anyway, there 345mm id say im level 2 now, im 28, 6 1.5, 216lbs. thanks for the help.

Also, when they popped out it was at high speed on hard snow. ive hit a few jumps, nothing massive, and they seemed ok.

Thanks, Mark
post #19 of 33
Thread Starter 
Cirquerider, so what do ya think? thanks.
post #20 of 33

Did anyone notice

That that's a pretty durn soft ski for a guy MNski's size?

If he hadn't mentioned that he has a Motion system I would have instantly thought 'check for Flex Effect'.

http://www.vermontskisafety.com/faq_..._skiers_8.html

Now, I'm wondering if, perhaps due to the ageing of the ski & bindings, perhaps due to how big his foot & boot are, that M10 might just not be able to keep up a consistent forward pressure, even with the added advantage of the Motion Rails.

Nothing to do with DIN, mind.
post #21 of 33
Thread Starter 
Do you think the ski is soft? i do not really know to be honest.
As for popping out, it is a hard thing to diagnose, theres so many things on that list.
post #22 of 33
Was the ski tip bouncing up and down a lot when you skied it fast? You could cause it to shake right off your boots if you ski fast enough on hard rough terrain. A stiffer ski might help prevent that. Also, I don't know much about marker bindings, but if it is not a "free-flexing" (mounted on some sort of rail to allow the toe and heel to maintain the same distance as the ski flexes), and if you are arcing the ski and flexing it a lot you could be releasing because your bindings is compensating for what it "thinks" is a forward fall.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
That that's a pretty durn soft ski for a guy MNski's size?
.
Not only is it a soft boot, but a 345mm shell? that is huge. Dollars to donuts he is in a boot that is too big.
post #24 of 33
345mm, 6'1", 215#, DIN @ 7 or 6.5...

DIN 10 binding? Might be a little light for him in my mind. Especially if he's flexing the heck out of the ski if it's a lighter flexing ski. I don't know anything about the Volkl Energy 220 though.
post #25 of 33
FWIW:
Level II, 355mm, 6'6", 235#, DIN @ 8.5 ---- 355 mm shell <- size 15 feet ;-)

MNskier - I don't have any great advice except to recommend that you persist until you find a solution.
post #26 of 33
Thread Starter 
The boot is not soft, its a w10, there actually rated more stiff.

And i wear size 14 shoes so thet fit is good.

the skies im not sure of though. thanks for helping guys
post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 
TTT anyone?
post #28 of 33

Binding DIN Settings

Sorry about the delay, here are the current DIN guidelines (click to enlarge):



So 345 boot sole, 6-1: and 26 years old. Level I skiing puts you at 5 1/2 and Level II at 6 1/2. Given your age and description of "carving hard" and being in bumps, I'd say level II. Set the bindings at 6 1/2 for starters. If you release inadvertently and he forward pressure is correct, you could increase one-half to one full step.
post #29 of 33
Cirquerider, Would you happen to have a link to that DIN chart? I can't seem to read it and would like to save a copy for future reference. Thanks!!
post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 
Thank you Cirq...

btw, im 28, but im sure that wouldent change anything lol
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