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Bevel angle measuring tool

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Has anyone tried this device available at tognar?


KUNZMANN BEVEL GAUGE
This professional-quality steel gauge from Germany lets you quickly check the base or side edge bevel on a ski or snowboard. It measures side bevel in 1 degree increments (from 0 to 5), and base bevels in the following increments: 1/2, 3/4, 1, 1 1/4, 1 1/2 and 2 degrees.
post #2 of 16
I've tried one (I'm a Kunzmann dealer in the UK) but found that you've still got to have a good light source & good eyesight to see whether the gauges sit flush or not on the narrow edges.

I find it far easier to just to test an inch or two of blacked-out edge by lighty using a fine stone with a selection of differing angle guides.

Three of the base gauges I'd never use as I've never had any reason to know whether a base angle is either 1.25, 1.5 or 2 degrees (if it's over 1 then for most people the ski needs a grind & the base edge resetting). I'd probably also never to have to use the 86 & 85 degree side gauges so that's a lot of $ to lay out to use just say 70% of the tool when for virtually the same price one could buy three Kunzmann 316* base guides (0.5, 0.7 & 1) plus three Kunzmann 3111* side guides (89, 88 & 87) which would far more practical use.
post #3 of 16
I agree with spyderjon. Overrated.
post #4 of 16
Good points and alternative measuring option. I just pulled out our side bevel meter tom double check our multi-tool accuracy this past week. It was the first time I used it and it's readily available. It's definitely not a tool for everyone or the typical recreation tuner.

The one advantage I did notice was that by using the meter angles you weren't beveling to with a bright light, it clearly gave you indication plus or minus from the angle you were beveling or measuring, which was a helpful form of double checking.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyderjon View Post
Three of the base gauges I'd never use as I've never had any reason to know whether a base angle is either 1.25, 1.5 or 2 degrees (if it's over 1 then for most people the ski needs a grind & the base edge resetting).
Salomon + snowboards can be in this range.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any experience using this tool?

SUN VALLEY SKI TOOLS: Pro Bevel Meter
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

The one advantage I did notice was that by using the meter angles you weren't beveling to with a bright light, it clearly gave you indication plus or minus from the angle you were beveling or measuring, which was a helpful form of double checking.
??? I don't understand this, please explain.
post #8 of 16
I think what he means is: using a 87 gauge on a 88 degree edge you can see a lit triangle at the corner of the L that tells you how far you have to cut.
post #9 of 16
...or if you are trying to verify a 87° angle, the 87° meter should show zero light behind it or a parallel sliver of light if the meter is pulled off the edge. By placing the 88° & 86°, you will see triangles of light, inverted from each other. It may be able to notice slight differences(or same if very similar) in the triangles than a slightly off (or on) parallel light sliver.

In other words, if the 87° bevel meter looks correct, then the two triangles will also look equal for the other adjacent bevel meters and will reinforce or bring into question the initial read.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Salomon + snowboards can be in this range.
I know, scary isn't it!

I've prepped about 5/6 new boards in the last couple of months, all of differing manufacturers I think. All of them had factory base angles of between 0.5 to 1.0 degree whereas a couple of years ago they all seemed to be well over 1 degree.

Has anyone else experienced this?
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Anyone have any experience using this tool?

SUN VALLEY SKI TOOLS: Pro Bevel Meter

Just a bump to see if any techs out there have had access to this tool. Looks like it would give an accurate measurement, however its not cheap!
post #12 of 16
Don't take this the wrong way, but I feel compelled to ask out of general confusion:

As someone who doesn't notice the difference of a ski without wax versus one with, or cheap versus performance wax, how can you or anyone tell the difference from minor (or even major) inaccuracies on edge angles to need that accuracy, much less consider this expense?

I'm asking this after thinking I'm seeing many tuners get absolutely anal about edges but not about wax and base structuring. Is this a regional thing? Relative to snow type or misguided priorities? Rec versus racers? Is there something I'm missing?
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
As someone who doesn't notice the difference of a ski without wax versus one with, or cheap versus performance wax, how can you or anyone tell the difference from minor (or even major) inaccuracies on edge angles to need that accuracy, much less consider this expense?
A) I never commented on cheap vs performance wax

B) Wax vs No Wax: I was referring to recreational skiing only (as I stated in my post) and in addition limited it to cold dry snow conditions.

C) It doesn't take much of a variance in edge angle to throw off a ski's performance in hard snow conditions. All of my friends that can carve a turn on a solid surface can feel when something is off with their edges.

D) I'd argue that edge angles are the most important part of tuning so having a tool that could accurately read edge angles would be valuable. I wouldn't plop down $200+ myself but I'm sure I could get a few of my buddies to chip in. At $50 each I think it would be worthwhile to have around (if it works).
post #14 of 16
I was generally referring what appears to be typical theme here for the rec tuner, that there seems to be a highly weighted focus on the edge accuracy and not the bases. To me they should be equally weighted in terms of focus, attention and caliber and relative to the level you are truly at. Sorry if it got misinterpreted or should have been worded better.

Group buying esoteric and expensive tools is definitely a good way for anyone and their friends to assemble an excellent set of tools.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
A)D) I'd argue that edge angles are the most important part of tuning so having a tool that could accurately read edge angles would be valuable.
I'd agree with most of what you've said except that Base Edge bevel is the most crucial variable having the most effect on ski feel and performance.
post #16 of 16
Or use a combination square with a protractor head...varying qualities and varying prices.
http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/N2DRVS...16886#NOANCHOR


Ken
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