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best skiing state - Page 2

post #31 of 101
Yeah, a couple years ago I was at Alta riding a lift with some locals, I told them I skied mostly in Vermont... they were laughing and making some "bunny hill" comments until I pointed out that most of the places in Vermont have = or > verticals than Alta...blank vacant stares ensued
post #32 of 101
So, by those stats, pretty much every ski area in the East beat Park City's average snowfall.... cool! I hope that happens again this year.
post #33 of 101
The best state to ski in?

Happiness

The rest is relative.
post #34 of 101
Harry has the right idea. But I'd have to say BC is the most likely to rule that category too. It's definitely a laid-back place. I couldn't say the same about Utah, though it's improved since the Olympics.

Might as well talk about North America, since those of us living here ski it that way.

The BC natives tell me that what makes their snow so distinctively good is their location between the coast and continent: their snow has the stickiness of coastal snow and the lightness of continental snow, making it more stable than continental snow and less dense than coastal snow. It is so plentiful because warm coastal air masses hit the perpetual cold parked at Alberta right over the Okanagan region and the interior mountains. (I can't speak about Whistler/Blackcomb or other resorts on the coast, because I haven't skied there yet. I'm talking about the areas north of Spokane, where I grew up, and the heli operations in the Monashees, Selkirks, Bugaboos, etc.)
post #35 of 101
All these posts and only Bec got it!

The best state to ski in is one where there's white under your planks and a smile on your face. If you want to add the sun in the sky then fine...

... but personally I prefer it when there's just that bit of blue starting to poke through the odd break in the cloud..like you get after a fresh dump. The snow creeks ever so slightly under your skis as you break trail to the fall line, then nothing apart from the whoosh of the turn and the whoops of joy in front and behind you as your friends then the rest of the world discover the same virgin slopes you've just had the PRIVIALEGE of tracking.(yes, you've been humble enough to hand over first tracks to one of your buddies even though you were first there)...

In that state skiing will never have any borders or frontiers, just a unity that binds us all together.

...to the 23rd of Dec and Chamonix, Feb in Wyoming/Utah and wherever I can get before, in between and after... as one great singer/song writer once nearly said..."Where are the clouds, Send in the clouds"
post #36 of 101
The best state to ski in? Easy question, Colorado. Lots of great skiing, pretty good snow, great night life at small resort towns. Nuff said! (plus your not in line in front of me)

Snowbird is in Salt Lake County.
post #37 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:


The BC natives tell me that what makes their snow so distinctively good is their location between the coast and continent: their snow has the stickiness of coastal snow and the lightness of continental snow, making it more stable than continental snow and less dense than coastal snow. It is so plentiful because warm coastal air masses hit the perpetual cold parked at Alberta right over the Okanagan region and the interior mountains.

So, Nolo (or anyone else), your post brings up a question I've had for awhile.

Every time things get really crowded around here (like Christmas/New Year's week or President's Weekend), we start batting around the idea of moving to a ski resort that has far fewer people and lots 'o snow. Interior BC always seems to come up.

Correct me if I'm wrong (it happens frequently), but aren't the average annual snowfall numbers for most of the interior BC ski resorts in the 250" to 300" range? It seems like I've looked at some listings and that most of them fall right around there.

Not that 300" is anything to sneeze at, but it seems like it's a bit on the thin side when comparing with Utah, Wyoming, and maybe even Montana.

Is it just that there's nobody to ski what does fall on those BC areas, or do the stats not tell the true story?

Bob
post #38 of 101
"I have only ever skiied in utah"

"And just for the record I have been back east, but that doesn't even qualify as skiing it's more like ice skating on an inlcine."

Or:

" I can tell something by statistics. "

" and you can't really tell where the best places are just by the statistics"
post #39 of 101
figures lie and liars figure

OR

If resort A gets one-million inches of snow annually but the four days i'm there nothing falls from the sky but stars, i don't care about the million inches a year.
(though i'm grateful for the base.)

cliche but true: best state to ski, as has been said, is the state i'm skiing in that day.
post #40 of 101
Only "Bec" got it right? I'm insulting! What, after all is happiness but fleeting prescience of Nirvana.

Bob Peters;

Yes, the Okanagon resorts suffer a bit from low snowfall totals. They are quite popular with the family crowd, though. One reason is the consistent temperatures that keep the snowpack relatively soft. The resorts in that area are known for their 10cm days-often day after day. No Alta storms, but better quality snow than is often found at WB.

Moving SE you find the heavier snowfalls of the Selkirks/Koots. Great skiing-but little to speak of in amenities. Sleepy little towns with small scale areas. Not really a "resort" to speak of in most cases.

North into the Rockies-more variable conditions. Some years are great, while others are little short of barren. Overall, the snowfalls and snowpacks there are also shy of the coastal areas.
post #41 of 101
Bob,

CMH's brochure states that snowfall ranges between 470-790 inches per season. That settles to a base depth of 8-16 feet. I'm surprised to read that Red Mountain's annual snowfall averages 300 inches.

By Spokane standards, 300 inches is plentiful. (FYI, Bridger Bowl gets 350 inches of annual snowfall and Big Sky says it gets 400+.)
post #42 of 101
one thing's sure - Montana is NOT EVEN in the running with CO or UT, and certainly not any part of BC.

I'd say UT has the lightest snow.

CO has the most reliable/steady quality of snow.

BC has skiing for sure. But it's a lot of money to try to naturalize, and you must have demonstrable employment in BC. The gov't is VERY protective of its citizens when an immigrant seeks employment, and will turn away immigrants if BC residents might be able to fill the job.
post #43 of 101
Thread Starter 
I know for a fact that powdermountain gets over 500 inches, but I guess a-lot depends on where you get your stats from. On odysseyski.com it says most utah resorts get 500 inches.
post #44 of 101
Thread Starter 
MrHyak where the hell is deer park, maybe next time you look up stats you make sure they are from an actual resort.
as for vert statistics places in Utah and all over the west could get more vert if their mountains were nice and round so a lift could go from the bottom of the mountain(4,200)to the top of the mountain(11,000+)
these are some cool pics from alta(most manly terrain in Utah)
http://www.powdermag.com/images/gallery//813294.jpg
http://www.powdermag.com/images/gallery//22084.jpg
post #45 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
cliche but true: best state to ski, as has been said, is the state i'm skiing in that day.[/QB]
Jeez, talk about evading the question. You'd never get away with a wishy-washy answer like that on the O'Reilly factor! :

I don't mean to just pick on you Ryan. Seems like half of the answers to this simple question are politically correct spin designed to avoid offending anybody. Ooooooh, we don't want to hurt anybody's feelings : not even the people in B.C., who DON'T LIVE IN A STATE!! not that you can't talk about B.C. but please...

BILL O'REILLY WHERE ARE YOU???? :

[ September 15, 2003, 03:22 PM: Message edited by: Carvemeister ]
post #46 of 101
Thread Starter 
I went to skiutah.com and found: Alta, Snowbird, brighton, Powdermountain, solitude all get 500 inches, and brian head comes close with 425. Just wondering where you got your stats from, I would think the resorts home site would be most accurate.
post #47 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by eastsucks:
I know for a fact that powdermountain gets over 500 inches, but I guess a-lot depends on where you get your stats from. On odysseyski.com it says most utah resorts get 500 inches.
Well, if you using skiodyssey as your source of stats that is your problem. That site is VERY inaccurate..... It lists some of my local hills with vertical 200'-400' more then actual along with other minor mis-information.

That site is a "hype" site with very much "unofficial" info.
post #48 of 101
New Jersey has the best skiing :

denile-deriver in Africa

[ September 15, 2003, 03:24 PM: Message edited by: BillA ]
post #49 of 101
7 of the top 10 resorts....are located where....
++++ Colorado ++++
so take your pick....there is so much to ski...and so little time to do it....
post #50 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by MrHyak:

Alta - 517"
Snowbird - 467"
Solitude - 395"
Brighton - 382"
Park City - 287"
Canyons - 280"
Deer Park - 328"
Brian Head - 331"

If you want to quote stats, get yours straight first. Only one area averages 500".......[/QB]
Where exactly did you find those averages? Just curious, cause Snowbird, Brighton, and Solitude have averages of 500" (according to Ski Utah) Snowbasin claims an average of 400, PC, The Canyons, and Deer Valley claim 350". Where exactly is Deer Park, UT?
post #51 of 101
eastsucks:

I'm with mrhyak on those stats. The ones he quoted sound very close to what I've always understood them to be. (And the Deer "Park" thing is likely just an inside joke.)

If you follow the storm totals very closely, you'll almost always find that the Forest Service (the ones who keep the official records as opposed to the advertising totals that the ski areas publish) usually reports Alta getting the most out of given storm, Snowbird a little less, Brighton/Solitude a little less than that, and PCMR, Deer Valley, and The Canyons a fair bit less still.

It's been happening for a long time. Nothing new about it. Alta is the only one that *averages* in the 500" range. Someone once posted a website that had a rundown on the vertical drop and average snowfall of most of the ski resorts in North America. It would be nice if someone could post that now.

On the broader question, I'm with AltaSkier (one of the *very* few times).

I've skied most every state in the West, although I can't speak for the East. Colorado is the hands-down winner. I can't even understand why there would be a discussion.

7 million skier-days can't be all wrong.

Bob
post #52 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by Bob.Peters:
...Someone once posted a website that had a rundown on the vertical drop and average snowfall of most of the ski resorts in North America. It would be nice if someone could post that now.

[/QB]
Good solid no-spin answer. Anything for you, Bob: http://members.aol.com/crockeraf/

Enjoy it one and all!!!
post #53 of 101
Deer Park is in Washington, North of Spokane and South of Chewelah, home of 49 Degrees North. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #54 of 101
Deer Park is a "Lost Ski Area" in WA. and I meant Deer Valley....

I host the "Lost Ski Areas of WA" site so that is why I had Deer Park on the brain I guess.....

Lost Ski Areas of Washington
http://hyak.net/lost

I use the AOL site mentioned for a very un-biased and most accurate account of snowfall. Many local hills will fudge numbers in a way to get the output wanted....they will take an average of maybe the last 5 years if they recently had one good year and/or round up or just plain exaggerate...its all marketing and we're all used to it. Many resorts will also use YEARLY totals instead of SEASONAL totals counting snow that falls before and after the season, snow that for any practical purpose doesn't matter.
post #55 of 101
That snow site uses some pretty shaky numbers also.

There is no guarantee of standardization of sites, or the methods/times of collection.

Measuring snow totals is a bit of a fools game if a person is trying to nail down real numbers on ski areas with thousands of acres coverage. There aren't many ski areas in the west small enough that a single number gives a number reflective of everything the area has to offer, so generalities are likely in order. The idea of any of the Utah canyon resorts using the 500 inch number is probably reasonable, since they all have areas with advantageous snow accumulation. ...Arguing over it has questionable value, since all resorts have similar situations with areas inside their boundaries having considerably higher or lower snowfall accumulation than advertised.

Bec has the best angle on this whole thing!
post #56 of 101
Quote:
The east does suck and anyone who says otherwise is in denile or stupid.
I say otherwise and I say YOU are a moron!


[ September 16, 2003, 05:30 AM: Message edited by: Nightingale ]
post #57 of 101
Quote:
Originally posted by feal:
That snow site uses some pretty shaky numbers also.

There is no guarantee of standardization of sites, or the methods/times of collection.

Measuring snow totals is a bit of a fools game if a person is trying to nail down real numbers on ski areas with thousands of acres coverage. There aren't many ski areas in the west small enough that a single number gives a number reflective of everything the area has to offer, so generalities are likely in order. The idea of any of the Utah canyon resorts using the 500 inch number is probably reasonable, since they all have areas with advantageous snow accumulation. ...Arguing over it has questionable value, since all resorts have similar situations with areas inside their boundaries having considerably higher or lower snowfall accumulation than advertised.

Hmmm.

I don't think I agree with your underlying assumption, Feal.

If "arguing about it has questionable value", would you believe me if I told you that Park City would be as logical a resort for you to visit as Alta, assuming you wanted the absolute best possible chance at skiing deep, fresh powder?

While I don't know about most other resorts, the one I'm best acquainted with, Jackson Hole, measures their snowfall in partnership with snow rangers from the Bridger Teton National Forest.

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort Snow Study Sites

A great deal of care has been taken to site the snow study plots in areas on the mountain where wind effects are minimized if not eliminated. The Forest Service shares their snowfall and snowpack data with the US Geological Service, which uses the info to aid in making critical decisions about stream flow projections and water use allocations. It's in everybody's best interest to have the numbers be as dead-on as possible.

I think the site Carvemeister listed looks like about the most objective and comprehensive one I've come across. I'd much rather believe it than most of the other crap I see thrown around (even though the average cited for Jackson Hole isn't as complimentary as I'd like to see).

Bob
post #58 of 101
BC and Alberta [img]tongue.gif[/img]

Really, Utah or Colorado probably do (with Montana being up there) but I would go Colorado for the partying as well. Utah's drinking laws put me off
post #59 of 101
So, Nightingale, what is that, a blue square? I can vouch for Powder Mountain's 500". They get a crapload of snow in that valley. And about that NY vert, does it really matter when I would be looking down on the top of your mountain from my house? Just wondering.
post #60 of 101
Thread Starter 
Nightingale was that picture supposed to be impressive?
Thanks I was getting a little depressed about my local resort after looking at some Chamonix pictures.

picture was taken at Alta which got 100 inches in 100 hours not even you can argue with that.
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