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Curious about Car Stash/Colorado....

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Watching a news bit on surviving when stranded & the James Kim story made me wonder......

Living in Colorado - does everyone keep a bunch of stuff in your car in the event you get stranded?? Like food, water, blankets, etc??
post #2 of 29
Everyone? nope.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyboy View Post
Everyone? nope.
Well not "everyone" literally......
post #4 of 29
A very unfortunate incident for that family. Keeping food and extra clothing in your car is always good regardless of where you are. Knowing when your getting in over your head is even a better.
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
A very unfortunate incident for that family. Keeping food and extra clothing in your car is always good regardless of where you are. Knowing when your getting in over your head is even a better.
Very sad.....Were they on vacation & got lost or did they live there?

Since I live in the East, there's really no need for all that around here......but if I lived where there was a possibility of getting stuck like that, I'd probably have all sorts of stuff in the truck....
post #6 of 29
They were not from this area. SW Oregon. Remote, Steep, Snow and dense Woods, I grew up in that part of the state. They were taking a "short cut" from the Rouge Valley area Grants Pass,Ore. to the Coast by a secondary mountain road. Made a wrong turn and did not have experience in what to do. I always have some food and extra clothes with me. You never know what you will encounter on the road or in the Woods.
post #7 of 29
My car has a lot of that stuff, but I always think I should have more. I'm not too worried in the winter (there are usually lots of people around the ski areas) unless I'm driving to West Yellowstone or somewhere like that (that road can get scary in the winter). But in the summer it's easy to imagine getting stuck at a remote trailhead out of cell phone range.
post #8 of 29
There was a man struck for 11 days or so in Wasington last week. He stayed in his car. Anyone that is versed in the outdoors knows. If you go somewhere that is unfamiliar get a map. Or at least make some mental notes of your surroundings. Be prepared. Boy Scout motto. Know what is edible in the area. Tell someone where and when you leave. If a problem arises stay calm. Conserve your energy, consider your options.
post #9 of 29
I tried to keep an extra MRE and a bottle of water in my car, but that was about it.
post #10 of 29
I live in NJ so it's not much of a problem, but If I lived in Colorado I would definently have granola bars, sweaters, blankets, water, and whatever else seemed necessary. I would probably also put the ski mag article on how to survive if something like that happens to you with the other stuff.
post #11 of 29
My wife basically demanded that I put homemade 'emergency kits' in all of our vehicles. We both had to flee from our offices in dowtown Manhattan on 9/11, and while I got over it eventually, she still can't shake it completely. Besides the basics (Good 1st Aid kit, h20 & MRE's) I've got a h2o filtration kit, firestarting materials (h2o proof matches, lighters & flint + knife), Potassium Iodide pills (we live ~30 miles east of Indian Point) a collapsable 10gal jug for h2o storage, 4 military blankets + a 12'x12' sheet of plastic, led flashlight (rechargable by shaking it) as well as some other odds and ends.

Initially I was annoyed by having to put all this stuff together, but now that i've had the kits for a few years, I feel better knowing that they are there. Just in case.

One interesting note on the family that got stranded in Oregon. I understand that they got stuck on the same road as the family in the RV last winter that made the news. Fortunately, last year, no one died. The parents left the kids in the RV with their grandmother and set out together to find help.
post #12 of 29
In the trunk of my car... I have a plastic storage box with flip lids. I keep jumper cables, cranking flashlight, tow straps, bottled water and fruit juice, balance bars and other food bars, extra clothes, etc. In addition I carry snowchains. Pretty much all year around because I am always going up to the mountains.

Also, I don't like going to fast food joints and prefer to carry my own stash of food and water.

Half the time my pack is in the car with frs radio, space blanket and other stuff.
post #13 of 29
Even tho i live in the East i keep blankets , a shovel , an extra carpet remant ialong with energy bars , a flashlite , matches and a few Votive candles , xtra gloves a hat and always have extra ski clothes in my gear anyway . Moreover i have Onstar
post #14 of 29
The big thing with the Kims is they left "civilization" with barely enough fuel in the car to get where they were headed. Anyone venturing anywhere off a major highway in the mountains should have a full tank of fuel. He'd still be alive if they'd had enough fuel to keep starting the car to warm it up occasionally.
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenscats5 View Post
Living in Colorado - does everyone keep a bunch of stuff in your car in the event you get stranded?? Like food, water, blankets, etc??
Colorado is nothing like where they were; at least for 99% of the people. In Colorado, response time for someone finding you would be measured in hours if not minutes. You would have to try REALLY hard to end up on a strange mountain road, stranded, and nowhere near civilization. (Getting stranded near civilization isn't that hard though.)

I tend to keep scraps of food in my truck, extra jackets, and extra gloves. Not because I'm prepared, but because my truck is a filthy mess. Sometimes there's an avy shovel in there for the same reason.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
Colorado is nothing like where they were; at least for 99% of the people. In Colorado, response time for someone finding you would be measured in hours if not minutes.
Unless you drove off the road like that guy who drove off I70 going up to the tunnel and wasn't found for 6 months.

We keep heavy sleeping bags in both cars and make sure we always have enough clothes to walk to help. We have a heated garage so it's easy to just jump in the car without heavy clothes but not smart.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
...
I tend to keep scraps of food in my truck, extra jackets, and extra gloves. Not because I'm prepared, but because my truck is a filthy mess. Sometimes there's an avy shovel in there for the same reason.
Tee hee -- I was just thinking this. Especially during winter, we keep so much in there ... right now there are three ski boot bags with gear, 5 pairs of poles, 2 pairs of skis, a snowboard, a pair of snowboard boots, 2 copper exterior wall sconces, a curtain rod, a Game Boy, various chargers and converters, a tennis racquet (broken), 2 lawn chairs, 3 blankets, 5 packets of Del Taco hot sauce .... yikes. But much of that could come in useful. Maybe not the lamps.

I do keep snowboots in one duffel bag full of snowboots, and coats, scarves, gloves, and hats in another; we throw those in the car when we go to the mountains in winter. We have a crate with jumper cables, rope, bungee cords, flashlight, first aid kit, poncho, umbrella, doggie waste bags, extra dog food, etc. And I always keep a bucket of trail mix and some water handy.

But it's true that most of us living on the Front Range/I-70 corridor are not very close to anywhere remote. I think Eastern Colorado is probably more risky in that sense ... they get some nasty blizzards out there, too.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by breckview View Post
... We have a heated garage so it's easy to just jump in the car without heavy clothes but not smart.
Yeah, I battle my kids about this. "Take your coat!" "No, I don't need it!" "You might!"

But I try to at least teach them about being prepared. My husband had a car accident last February at about 6 am ... it was about 5 degrees out, and the coffee that spilled all over him during the wreck had frozen his pants stiff by the time he entered the ambulance for EMTs to evaluate him.
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
Colorado is nothing like where they were; at least for 99% of the people. In Colorado, response time for someone finding you would be measured in hours if not minutes. You would have to try REALLY hard to end up on a strange mountain road, stranded, and nowhere near civilization. (Getting stranded near civilization isn't that hard though.)

I tend to keep scraps of food in my truck, extra jackets, and extra gloves. Not because I'm prepared, but because my truck is a filthy mess. Sometimes there's an avy shovel in there for the same reason.
I've never ever been out west so I don't know the area or what it's like, etc....so wasn't sure how "stranded" they were....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
The big thing with the Kims is they left "civilization" with barely enough fuel in the car to get where they were headed. Anyone venturing anywhere off a major highway in the mountains should have a full tank of fuel. He'd still be alive if they'd had enough fuel to keep starting the car to warm it up occasionally.
Ah! Well that I didn't hear......interesting....
post #20 of 29
My standard winter survival kit goes into the car in October and stays there until April. It consists of a sleeping bag, survival candle, extra granola bars, shovel, and flashlight. However, the most important part of survival is: Don't leave the car!!! closely followed by: Tell someone where you are going and when you will arrive/return! Had Kim stayed with his family, he would have survived (a car provides significant shelter and with body heat and some additional blankets you won't have to worry about hypothermia even up here in the frozen north). If the search starts within a day or so of your being overdue, then your chances of being found are pretty darn good, particularly if you remain with a vehicle and make it visible (this is why I make it a point to phone home every time I come off the mountain to let my family know I am ok).
post #21 of 29
Remember the rule of 3's...

You can survive for:

Three hours without shelter
Three days without water
Three weeks without food
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by breckview View Post
Unless you drove off the road like that guy who drove off I70 going up to the tunnel and wasn't found for 6 months.
Yeah, if it was an accident I could see that. Remember that poor woman who disappeared last winter and they found her car on the bottom of Lake Dillion? I'd venture to say several hundred people drove that stretch of road that day.

However, just ending up 25 miles down a closed road and getting stuck is pretty tough to do. Colorado doesn't seem to have the random logging roads found in many other states.

Regarding the 'rule of threes'. I saw that on CNN last night too. The food and water are definitely true, but 3 hours without shelter? What's that all about? Perhaps they meant: 3 hours if it's brutally cold and you decided to strut around naked. Or, 3 hours if it's cold and you slipped and fell into a stream and were dying of hypothermia. Or maybe, 3 hours if you're stuck in a jungle surrounded by killer bees while monkeys are throwing coconuts at you.
post #23 of 29
most poeple I know don't even check the pressure in their tires...
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyboy View Post
most poeple I know don't even check the pressure in their tires...
There is pressure in my tires:

post #25 of 29
Now there's 3 guys on Mt.Hood for a number of days they are trying to find. Hope they get to them before the next BIG storm cycle hits. Be careful out there folks.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by breckview View Post
We have a heated garage so it's easy to just jump in the car without heavy clothes but not smart.
I have garage envy.
post #27 of 29
Worse thing about Kim is that he was an editor for Cnet (geek) and it looks like he was following a Google map. Yahoo and Mapquest both say "Not in Winter" but Google reccommends this road 365.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
Worse thing about Kim is that he was an editor for Cnet (geek) and it looks like he was following a Google map. Yahoo and Mapquest both say "Not in Winter" but Google reccommends this road 365.
Interesting. Stache, did Google's road recommendation or lack of winter advisory come out in the news? I did not hear that. Wonder if we will see modifications with all online map services if this becomes (if it can become) liability issue for Google.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
Worse thing about Kim is that he was an editor for Cnet (geek) and it looks like he was following a Google map. Yahoo and Mapquest both say "Not in Winter" but Google reccommends this road 365.
Common Sense vs Technology.:
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