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level 1/2 - worth doing? what skis to use?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hey, I need some advice, I live in the PNW and ski about 100 days a year between Baker, Crystal, and W/B, I spend most of my time freeriding, don't do much park.. my current everyday ski is a 184 Rossignol B-squad, I'm 160 pounds, 5'11".

While I can get down pretty much anything, I don't feel that I have the greatest technique and would like to improve this. I've taken a couple of group lessons when they were cheap and didn't learn or improve much.. I want to get better at the fundamentals, improve my carving and mogul skiing.. I figure improving those skills can only improve my skiing on every level and would surely benefit my freeriding. I was told once that the best lesson you can get is to get your teaching levels.. in my case I could probably get my level 1 and 2, i doubt i could get my 3. Do you guys agree with that statement? I just want to learn the most for the least amount of money, I have no interest in teaching..

If so, I would need a new pair of skis, a local shop is selling some demo skis, they have Volkl 6 Stars for $150 w/ demo bindings (sizes 161 and 175), and Volkl P60 Customs for the same price (size 168). Would any of these skis be suitable for take my level 1/2? If not, what would you reccomend, I don't want to spend a lot.. thanks!
post #2 of 18
Wow, there is a lot of questions in this post. I am going to move it over to Gear where I think you might get a better response.
post #3 of 18
Membership in PSIA requires that you be ski instructor, unlike in other countries where I think you need to get certified first. PSIA clinics are designed for the education of ski instuctors.

ESA (the clinics put on by Epicski.com) offer excellent instruction with top level instructors on a par with PSIA clinicians, with an emphasis on improving your skiing rather than developing teaching skills.
post #4 of 18
Most ski areas conduct hiring clinincs for prospective instructors during their first few weeks of operations. Basically, you will go out with SS supervisors and they will watch you ski, give you some tasks to accomplish and evaluate your potential. If you get hired, you will have the opportunity to train with the Technical staff for whatever levels you are ready to try for.

SJ
post #5 of 18
Unless you are willing to develop an interest in teaching I would advise against going that route. They will make you teach. They will teach you too and you will get better.

SierraJim, which of those skis would be best suited for a candidate for PSIA certification, assuming he has the skiing skills for level 2?
post #6 of 18
You have to teach to get Certs. That is the point to achieving them . You use them to measure your level of PSIA certified teaching skils. If you have no interest in teaching you will have no use for Certifications.
Better for you would be lessons from a Certified instructor of the highest level you woud find appropriate. ESA and other skills clinics or camps would raise your level of skils. There are steep and deep camps for a high level of instruction you could use to improve your skiing.
post #7 of 18
im an instructor and I would say I dont know if it would be the best thing. Level 1 teaches you very basic skills and level 2 teaches you a little more intermediate. If you chose to do this I would get in as many sessions as you can in the morning with your ski school director, as this is where you learn for yourself.
post #8 of 18
With your "self description, after two weeks of training in an instructors intro clinic .... and about a year teaching with other developmental clinics tossed in to get you there, you are correct; you may make Level 1 Cert.

Level 2 ..... you got a long way to go and dues to pay along the way.

Just MHO.
post #9 of 18
Speaking from experience - if you're looking to improve your skiing I would recommend marrying a Level III instructor. It's great, free lessons for life, can ask questions off of the hill, they even buy you skis and take you on trips out West.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
With your "self description, after two weeks of training in an instructors intro clinic .... and about a year teaching with other developmental clinics tossed in to get you there, you are correct; you may make Level 1 Cert.

Level 2 ..... you got a long way to go and dues to pay along the way.

Just MHO.
i think things are different in canada because my friend got his csia levels 1, 2, and 3 in a span of three months last year. from what i've read and been told, you pay $300-400, take a four day course with an exam at the end, if you pass, you're certified level 1, can teach, and can take your level 2 course/exam if you choose to.
post #11 of 18
The statement "I can get pretty much down anything", is a bit of a ringer. 99% of the L-2's .... anything isn't much of a problem at all ... not even an issue. It does sound like we are a bit tougher in most ways then. At the day four mark after "a course" ..... just the thought of that scares the hell out of me.

Regarding the skis, it's like fly fishing. "Match the hatch" ... if you are going to be working on short radius turns, leave your GS skis in the locker. PSIA (apparently now), requires a "bronze" in NASTAR for L-1 and that would be a good time to pull out a GS'ish type ski. For short radius, I'd go for an SL .... certainly not a 190 tank destroyer/crud buster mid-fat!

The only exception that I am aware of where PSIA allowed a direct 1-2-3 progression was a USST WC guy three or four years ago.
post #12 of 18
A girl at Stowe did all three last year. It was like a full-time job with all of the pre-req clinics and driving. She was the first person in Eastern division to do it.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Unless you are willing to develop an interest in teaching I would advise against going that route. They will make you teach. They will teach you too and you will get better.

SierraJim, which of those skis would be best suited for a candidate for PSIA certification, assuming he has the skiing skills for level 2?
There is no task in L-1,2 (or 3) that is likely to be ski specific. That is to say, that an examiner won't assign a candidate a task that can't be accomplished on most any decent ski with a tune on it. AFAIK, stunt like "circle carves" etc are not part of the agenda.

If I were to train for a few weeks, I s'pose I might pass the skiing part of a L-2. The ski I would choose would probably be something manageble like an SUV 12, Modified, or Izor 9.7 or something like that. Remember that skiing hot is not required, just skiing well (and properly by their criteria)

Having said all that, I'd choose the 6* over the P60 because it is probably the more manageble of the two at exam speeds.

SJ
post #14 of 18
quixotle,

You have to work as ski instructor and be affiliated with ski school to take PSIA certification exams. If you choose to go with a ski school you will have very good chance to improve your skiing. Teaching could be fun, you never know until you try. The thing is that clinics for instructors are good but you also learn a lot about skiing while teaching others, it really helps.
As for the skis for L1-2-3 I think it does not matter much. If you are ready for the exam you should be able to pass on your current skis or on any other skis you are looking at. For whatever it worth I passed L2 on 191cm Volkl Vergito and L3 skiing on 165cm Atomic SL:11 race stock. I failed my teachinig part on the same skis but I do not think it was problem with skis
post #15 of 18
This question is being posed by PhitT, right? (http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?p=602559)

How many other PNW skiers with 184 Rossi B-Squads who ride 100+ days can there be?



Actually on closer inspection, I think they might be brothers...

I want to know how one cracks 100+ days a year if they're 1. in school or 2. have a full-time job? Snow/sicks days? or BCing before class/work?
post #16 of 18
Nope, If you look at my review it says I have 189cm squads. I ride at stevens pass not crystal I logged 100 days last year because I was going to a "home school @ a school" program thingy where I had to go 2x per week. Plus I hiked for turns for months after the season ended and went skiing at wistler during th summer.

To respond to the poster's question though, I hope that the psia level thing makes you better because I am hoping to teach skiing this year at stevens.
post #17 of 18
Most have echoed my post about PSIA and added something of value, but quixotle should go CSIA, eh?

Thanks Jim for getting to the question that has this thread in Gear section.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotle View Post
Hey, I need some advice, I live in the PNW and ski about 100 days a year between Baker, Crystal, and W/B, I spend most of my time freeriding, don't do much park.. my current everyday ski is a 184 Rossignol B-squad, I'm 160 pounds, 5'11".

While I can get down pretty much anything, I don't feel that I have the greatest technique and would like to improve this. I've taken a couple of group lessons when they were cheap and didn't learn or improve much.. I want to get better at the fundamentals, improve my carving and mogul skiing.. I figure improving those skills can only improve my skiing on every level and would surely benefit my freeriding. I was told once that the best lesson you can get is to get your teaching levels.. in my case I could probably get my level 1 and 2, i doubt i could get my 3. Do you guys agree with that statement? I just want to learn the most for the least amount of money, I have no interest in teaching..

If so, I would need a new pair of skis, a local shop is selling some demo skis, they have Volkl 6 Stars for $150 w/ demo bindings (sizes 161 and 175), and Volkl P60 Customs for the same price (size 168). Would any of these skis be suitable for take my level 1/2? If not, what would you reccomend, I don't want to spend a lot.. thanks!

ehhhh you ve been misguided I think. becoming an instructor wont for sure make you a better a freerider, it could help but there are probably better ways of going about it. Also alot of instructors are not interested in the type of skiing you are(trust me despite the what other on the board will lead to believe). Getting you teaching levels isnt worth if your not going to teach. So my advice is to find some technical minded freeskier rippers at you local mountain(instructors, racers, bumpers skier elect) and ski with them pick, thier brains on what they do, watch whats they do and just get out with people better than you.

Also attending camps like str8lines(gordy piefer knows his **** and I hear nothing but good thing about these camps) or even ESA(the one ran by epic probably not as freerider as gordy's camp but good nevertheless) are much better way to get what you want and not have to deal with the PSIA dues and such.
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