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Hot waxing in the parking lot

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Been doing hot waxes for some lady friends... but it has required taking their skis home, then waxing, then returning the skis.

So, I got an 800 watt inverter from Shucks Auto Parts for about $40. I tested using this from cigarette lighter outlet in my car and promptly blew that fuse. So I learned to use the battery clamps option.

I use a little travel iron rated at 230 watts -but I use it on the lowest setting. Anyway met a lady friend at the ski area parking lot. She had not got her skis waxed after last ski season and they looked a little dry. Clipped in the inverter to the car battery, ran an extension cord to back of the car so I could lean the skis on the trunk rim. Set the iron a little higher than the lowest setting because it was cold out there. Everything worked like a charm... dripped on the wax and spread it thinly. Had the front end of the ski leaning on the trunk rim and she held up the back end. Didn't drain my car battery much, it started up just fine. If I was going to do more than one pair of skis, I would get the motor running.

As you know, hot waxing skis can be messy, so doing it outside is a plus.

This is a quick fix. It leaves out the edge work and pothole filling. But it is nice to be able to do a quick hot wax. And it's nice to take care of the ladies.
post #2 of 22
Sounds like a Warren Miller scene.:
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruxpercnd View Post
Been doing hot waxes for some lady friends... but it has required taking their skis home, then waxing, then returning the skis.

So, I got an 800 watt inverter from Shucks Auto Parts for about $40. I tested using this from cigarette lighter outlet in my car and promptly blew that fuse. So I learned to use the battery clamps option.

I use a little travel iron rated at 230 watts -but I use it on the lowest setting. Anyway met a lady friend at the ski area parking lot. She had not got her skis waxed after last ski season and they looked a little dry. Clipped in the inverter to the car battery, ran an extension cord to back of the car so I could lean the skis on the trunk rim. Set the iron a little higher than the lowest setting because it was cold out there. Everything worked like a charm... dripped on the wax and spread it thinly. Had the front end of the ski leaning on the trunk rim and she held up the back end. Didn't drain my car battery much, it started up just fine. If I was going to do more than one pair of skis, I would get the motor running.

As you know, hot waxing skis can be messy, so doing it outside is a plus.

This is a quick fix. It leaves out the edge work and pothole filling. But it is nice to be able to do a quick hot wax. And it's nice to take care of the ladies.
Wow, that is really a new pick up line, especially in the parking lot. Hey ma'am, your skis are looking a little dry. How about a hot wax?
post #4 of 22
Seems like a lot of trouble just to get laid.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Seems like a lot of trouble just to get laid.

Well.. it's just a new world of possibilities....
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Seems like a lot of trouble just to get laid.

Well.. it's just a new world of possibilities.... working on some other entry lines... like "I've got an extra if your gloves get wet..." or "I always carry an extra hand warmer pac...."

Working on some more....
post #7 of 22
way to melt a woman's heart.
post #8 of 22
I hardwired an inverter into my Jeep for these sorts of things. I have it mounted under the rear seats so that the outlets are accessible without lifting up the seats. I ran a fused 4gague power wire from the battery right to the unit, virtually eliminating the possibility of damaging any of the electronics or fuses in the Jeep.

For $150, and about $40 in installation materials, it's been one of the best things I've ever done to my Jeep. I've never used it to hot wax skis, but it's been very handy for charging my laptop, cell phones, ipod and other junk while on the road. On a few occasions it's been a power source for my electric frying pan, allowing me to cook some mean burgers in the lot!
post #9 of 22
A car battery can supply something like 100 amps, at least for a little while, which would give you 1200 watts, if you want 'em. An ordinary home circuit is 120 volts x 15 amps = 1800 watts max. The cigarette lighter on a car has something like a 5 amp fuse, which limits that circuit to a miniscule 60 watts.

Does an ordinary iron (without any electronic thermostat or the like) care if it's running on AC or DC? I wouldn't think so. So all you really need is a simple transformer to convert 12 volts to 120. I think (because without the transformer, an iron designed for 120V won't draw enough current to do much of anything - an 800W iron would become an 8W iron).
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
So all you really need is a simple transformer to convert 12 volts to 120.
Sorry, but a transformer only works with AC. It is the alternating current that creates the expanding and collapsing magnetic fields in one coil that induce current in the step-up coil. An easily obtained inverter makes it pretty easy.
post #11 of 22
Are there any ways to use gas to power an iron, like using an old flatiron and a propane torch?
post #12 of 22
Interesting topic. At slope side demos, trail heads and parking lots, finding an efficient method of heating wax would be a nice option.

-a small generator is common but noisey
-relying on a car battery and inverter is direct, useful for other things year round, but will drain the battery if over used. Adding a solar cell for a trickle charge while skiing might be worth considering. Many offroaders add a separate battery to their vehicles for added power options and as a back up.
-using a standalone car starter and inverter for short periods of might be worth considering as it is a separate battery and can be used to restart vehicles. Adding the solar cell is an option as is charging while driving. Is anyone aware of a combo starter and 1000w or so inverter?
-It's not uncommon for a Nord to pull out a blow torch while messing with klister. I've been looking for a way to combine a propane or butane torch to the mix with a metal plate. A traditional heavy clothes iron is a lot of mass to heat up and would take a while and lots of fuel. I remember seeing a smaller one with a long wooden handle and would love to find one if someone has a source. I've considered a small stove with this option. An 800w iron uses an aluminum plate to evenly spread the heat and is also a light mass for heat retention but needs a constant heat source. It seems a moderately weighted metal mass that won't over heat, coupled with a torch is the direction to go for ultimate portability and convenience. If anyone has ideas here, please let me know.
-see the heating wax with hair dryer thread. A heat gun and metal scraper might also offer options for some, but not sure about the power requirements of a heat gun versus an iron.
-the Tools4Boards Terminator tuning stand is great for ultra weight and portability. For those with trailer hitches, they could also be used to add a simple ski or board support for easier and quicker waxing and quick tunes.

The easy solution to all of this is to consider spray and liquid waxes. (You'll have much more time to dream up new pick-up lines and simply ski.....or..... )
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Using the inverter may not drain the battery that much esp. if you have the engine running. I had no problem doing one pair of skis with the engine off, although I would probably just feel better having the engine on. Also, I just turned the iron off for the few moments while moving the skis around, thereby reducing the drain. I am guessing that because the travel iron is rated 700 watts at the highest level (6 amps AC), that because I am using a low setting, that I am using about 100 watts or about 1 or 2 amps AC. In addition there is probably some energy lost in the inverter, so I might bump up my estimate to 3-5 amps AC. But it did blow the fuse on the cig lighter outlet.. so maybe a little higher.


I thought about just applying a propane torch to the iron... harder to control the heat level and the whole process would just take longer, but it would work. You could even use the torch to drip the wax on directly.

Yes, I have offered the gals the Swix soft paste wax and the stuff that comes in the shoe polish bottle. It works fine as long as it is warm. The stuff coagulates in the cold. I do carry that stuff as a stop gap. I like hot wax because I believe that it protects the ski base better.

Protecting the base is not so critical when skiing powder, but when the slopes are icy and even hard groomed, then the ski base can take a real beating. A fresh coat of hot wax helps a lot. I just leave on a thin layer without scraping. I have been maintaining a friend's k2 Phat Luvs for about two and a half years and they still look great. If I didn't constantly fill and hot wax my skis, I know they would really get bombed out bases.
post #14 of 22
You truly ought to check out Maplus high melt (read hard) liquid and spray waxes, then. I haven't seen it coagulate in the cold yet (RacerRick was at Lake Louise during the Men's & then Women's WC downhill at -20°C/-4°F applying Universal liquid). With no heat, it's a little less durable then comparable solids, hot waxed. By adding heat with an iron over a teflon sheet it exceeds hot waxed solid wax's protection, durability and performance. This technique will require less heat and time and only brushing (or not)....plus wastes less gas running the engine.

(Note: keep an eye out for the Maplus Liquid & Spray wax test we're close to launching in the next couple/few weeks. We would be foolish to stick our necks out for this, not to mention the cost, if we didn't know how well it performs.)
post #15 of 22
PS a backup battery or a marine deep cycle may be in order.

4 hot waxes and no way to start home. :
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
If anyone has ideas here, please let me know.
Umm, I actually have one that runs off yer typical plumbers' canister. Really good for pine tar. Will post pix.
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
Looks like Marplus may have some products worth looking at.

I am starting to get some ideas for a propane powered iron. I have searched but haven't found one yet. Seems like a simple idea.... polished metal block with vent holes drilled in it... and clamping that would receive a small butane torch. Flame would be directed down a hole on the top and vented out the sides.....hmmm..
post #18 of 22
Check out this thread on irons. There's a shot of the base of the Maplus 800w iron which is convex for better wax flow (versus dead flat). I've been thinking along the same lines as you and think that a good design will be very useful.

Comprex thanks in advance for posting the pics.
post #19 of 22

Found it.



Reckon you're thinking of something quite larger though.
post #20 of 22


Hey, how about one of these? I think I can get one for cheap at my local surplus store, but I'm worried about potential overheating...

Kaj
post #21 of 22
Boy, you could be very popular on a cold day. Aside from keeping everyone warm, you could do production waxing from a distance, lining up an array of boards and torching them all at once, plus ice melt and BBQing! I want one. Great for tailgating too.

Another hot box idea: toast the pavement until it's hot, place skis or boards on a rack over the area and cover with a space blanket for quick bakes.

Comprex, what is that LP heater called and where are they available?
post #22 of 22
The mfg is Camping Gaz ; that specific unit is old enough to have been distributed by Wonder Corporation of America. My apologies if that is little help; I did not see it in the current www.campingaz.com range.
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