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First day in new boots - any tips?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
So, in a few days time I'll be in Stowe, and having my first day on snow in my new Kryptons.
Have you any tips for exercises/drills I should do, not just to get my ski legs back, but also to get used to flexing the new boots?
post #2 of 28
Do a state of the feet check up after the first 2 hours just in case the excitement masks something that you will regret later.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Do a state of the feet check up after the first 2 hours just in case the excitement masks something that you will regret later.
Get your feet used to the boots too. Either wear them on the flight over or sleep in them the night before.

I was very fortunate, it took me 3 turns to get used to the Kryptons, but I came from Flexons, so it was a natural evolution.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Get your feet used to the boots too. Either wear them on the flight over or sleep in them the night before.
We'll need pics...
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
We'll need pics...
I thought there were enough pics of me in my boots on here already! Have you some kind of foot fetish?
post #6 of 28
I like to isolate my skills on relatively easy terrain to see if there are any problems early in the season or when trying new equipment. I move my balance fore and aft, and feel the foot. I steer my skiswhile skidding them feeling for any lack of smoothness in my steering. I engage and release edges, especially releasing edges when forces are built up in a turn, skidding out from the turn. When releasing edges I feel for simulaneous release, which is a real potential issue for new boots. Finally, I try different ways of managing pressure in a turn and over what vertical contours I can find. I like to try going throughthe centerline turns next, wedge, wedge christie, open parallel and dynamic parallel. One very good exercise is to try to to low speed, low pitch dynamic parallel turns. If there is anything wrong with my movements I will stall out and stop, so it tells me lot.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
I thought there were enough pics of me in my boots on here already! Have you some kind of foot fetish?
Foot fetish ? You're talking to the wrong Phil...
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
FOG, thanks.

philippe, merci!
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
Foot fetish ? You're talking to the wrong Phil...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
FOG, thanks.

philippe, merci!
Guilty as charged!
post #10 of 28
WTFH

I have new Kryptons too. I've worn them around the house a bit and done some minor stuff to work out the kinks, (hot/pressure spots) etc. (No snow here, so no skiing yet.) I'm taking some material with me to make cushions to eliminate pressure spots when/if they form. (High density foam sheets and duct tape) If needed I can make up the pads at lunch or in the evening and try them out the next day.
post #11 of 28
I wear them watching tv and just around the house a little to break in the liner and so I dont get blisters. Once Im out there though its not testing time anymore. Personally I skip over the drills/balance stuff. I mean, what is doing any of that going to tell me? That my boots are comfortable/uncomfortable? I think youll figure out anything you need to know in the first run no matter what youre doing- regarding your boots or balance or whatever. And the Kryptons are such a great boot I dont think youll be thinking about how your boots feel or fit after about 7 seconds anyway.
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Brock, thanks for that - I'm hoping to get dialled in straight away!
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brock Landers View Post
I wear them watching tv and just around the house a little to break in the liner and so I dont get blisters. Once Im out there though its not testing time anymore. Personally I skip over the drills/balance stuff. I mean, what is doing any of that going to tell me? That my boots are comfortable/uncomfortable? I think youll figure out anything you need to know in the first run no matter what youre doing- regarding your boots or balance or whatever. And the Kryptons are such a great boot I dont think youll be thinking about how your boots feel or fit after about 7 seconds anyway.
The comfort thing is pretty straightforward and should be dealt with rapidly, but if you had your boots fitted, then the remaining issues should be subtle, and you need some very specific facts to help the bootfitter with remaining issues. If your boots were way out of balance after bootfitting get a new bootfitter. If your forward lean is way too much and your quads are burning, get a new bootfitter. If there is a hot spot in your boot, have our bootfitter grind or push it out. The subtle isseus are things that might not come up during bootfitting. For example your legs might move a little differently, so the canting may be off a hair on one ski. The ramp angle on your skis may be giving you issues, and you might need a toe lift. these things take actual skiing to determine. It is even better if you get a video for your bootfitter.
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
The comfort thing is pretty straightforward and should be dealt with rapidly, but if you had your boots fitted, then the remaining issues should be subtle, and you need some very specific facts to help the bootfitter with remaining issues. If your boots were way out of balance after bootfitting get a new bootfitter. If your forward lean is way too much and your quads are burning, get a new bootfitter. If there is a hot spot in your boot, have our bootfitter grind or push it out. The subtle isseus are things that might not come up during bootfitting. For example your legs might move a little differently, so the canting may be off a hair on one ski. The ramp angle on your skis may be giving you issues, and you might need a toe lift. these things take actual skiing to determine. It is even better if you get a video for your bootfitter.
I agree, Im just saying Ill figure this out going Mach 3- and Ill tweak anything (or visit the bootfitter) when the day is over. I get a little antsy and wouldnt go through the drills. I mean, I wouldnt ski all the time like I would in drills, so I feel anything Id want to know, Id find in the actual environment/skiing type that I usually am in.
post #15 of 28

Drill my bootfitter suggested

Hi Wear the Fox Hat!

I will be testing out my new boots hopefully on Monday if the weatherman was correct. My bootfitter suggested that I start out on a pretty mild run (plenty of those in Southeast Michigan ) and just do railroad turns for as many runs as I can stand to get used to my new boots.

Good luck!

~Anne~
post #16 of 28
WTFH, all of these guys are pulling your chain. Everyone knows that if your feet are comfortable, then your boots may not be fitting properly. In fact, as those of us who learned to ski in the seventies know, your feet should ideally be in excruciating pain. One of my friends will return to the shop for a "tightening up" if his feet are not bleeding by lunchtime. To facilitate this effect, I recommend leaving your boots outside in the car the night before skiing in them.
post #17 of 28
WTFH,

Ski in them a day or two to get the liner to conform to you before you have much done to them. Hopefully you have already had any canting done. If you have any "hot spots", deal with them asap.
Just ski them.

RW
post #18 of 28
Soak them with a hose then wear them till they dry on your feet.

That's what we did with the leather boots of the 60's .... kinda makes you appreciate the modern marvel of plastic and foam ??
post #19 of 28
I had someone stuff trail maps and napkins from the lodge in my boots once to make them fit. It worked.......for a while.
post #20 of 28
Fox, You mean you didn't get the ones with the Intuition liner in them? All this discussion could've been for naught. warm and toasty too......

Pay particular attention to your fore/aft positioning on your skis as well as the lateral. Play with shims 1mm to 3mm (under boot soles, toes and heels) to experiment with fore/aft. Check your lateral alignment with some one footed traverses on LTE and BTE's. This will all create an awareness of where you are standing and if there is a better place to be standing!?

Fit.....if it hurts, make room for it.

have fun in Stowe!

b
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
bud, they have the ID liner in them.

I intend to have fun in Stowe!

Thanks all, again.
post #22 of 28
I got my ID's set up a few weeks ago. I will be bringing my old trusted Thermoflexes along just for moral support, I doubt I will need them..I have no morals.
post #23 of 28
In that case all you have to do is smile

I would caution not to overbuckle them initially as the intuition liner foam is very springy and pushes back vs. compresses as it is buckled. You will find that you will use your micro adjustments on the buckles to fine tune the fit more than a stock liner. Overbuckling will cause achey feet.

Oh and if you feel excessive pain I would perscribe an aprez ski, fine malt!

b
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Bud, thanks for the other advice, which I may (or may not) remember. This bit...
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Oh and if you feel excessive pain I would perscribe an aprez ski, fine malt!

b
...on the other hand, will stick in my mind!
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Get your feet used to the boots too. Either wear them on the flight over or sleep in them the night before.
I would second this, although I personally prefer a different approach. I like to put mine on while I'm watching tv, and bukle em up, on the loosest setting. Then move to the next tightest for a while. When my feet start to hurt, i move em back to the loosest, then on to a tighter one, and so on and so for till I can't take it any more.
post #26 of 28

First of all...

...I assume you already had somebody competent fit you to them, get you aligned, footbeds checked out, and so forth. If not, do not pass go, go back and do this stuff or you're likely to get a rude, painful surprise in addition to maybe having technique problems.

If all the above is true, wear really thin socks and buckle up as lightly as possible. It looks like you have all kinds of performance doo dads to adjust the way they handle, so I'd say play with all of the above until you get the feeling you want...oh, and make sure you stick 'em on a good set of boot dryers every nite...
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
...I assume you already had somebody competent fit you to them, get you aligned, footbeds checked out, and so forth. If not, do not pass go, go back and do this stuff or you're likely to get a rude, painful surprise in addition to maybe having technique problems.
Yes , here's the story...
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=47170

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
If all the above is true, wear really thin socks and buckle up as lightly as possible. It looks like you have all kinds of performance doo dads to adjust the way they handle, so I'd say play with all of the above until you get the feeling you want...oh, and make sure you stick 'em on a good set of boot dryers every nite...
Thanks, will do!
post #28 of 28
WTFH,

We'll be interested to hear how it goes. Intuitive liners are supposed to be pretty comfortable right away.

I'm going to get a pair of Dobermans with Conformable foamed liners next week. I've been warned that the first few days will not be comfortable!:

This is the first time I've taken this kind of plunge. I've had custom footbeds for years, of course, but I've always done my own boot mods (no sole grinding) with duct tape, closed-cell foam, Dremel tools, drills, a large hammer or two, and maybe a wood chipper and a chain saw.
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