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New Boots!

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Finally pulled the trigger on some new boots today in Sturtevant's. Tried on a pair of Nordica Speedmachine 12s that felt better than anything else I've tried on so far. Size 10 foot, went with a size 25.5 boot. Their scale put me at 26.5.

I left them in the shop to pick up on friday...They're going to punch out a little more room for my big toe, and create a bit more room around the forefoot in the left boot, as that is my bigger foot and I noticed some pain there in the shop. I also asked them to soften the boots slightly. I'm 150lb, and the 110 flex felt marginally too stiff in the shop, so it would definitely be too stiff on the mountain. On the off chance that they do end up feeling too soft, I can always crank them up to the stiffer setting.

Went with Comformable custom footbeds - WOW! I honestly did not expect good footbeds to make as much difference as they did. I have a very high instep, so I may notice the difference more than others. All I know is that after putting the boots back on with the new footbeds installed, they felt 10 times better.

Now I just have to hope I have enough money left to go skiing!


Josh
post #2 of 26
Good to hear, Josh. Let us know how you get on when you hit the slopes!
post #3 of 26
Josh, what is the sole length. The mondo is kind of irrelevant. I am a 10.5 street and I am in 304 Atomic RT's. Good job though!
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Not quite sure...will check when I pick them up tomorrow.
post #5 of 26
Josh, good report, obviously you are pleased. Did you go in expecting to spend time with fitting and custom work or did it evolve with their effort and questions with you? About how much time did you spend overall? Thanks.
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
I definitely intended to get the custom footbeds made. Whether or not I would need any modifications done to the boots depended on the fit, but based on the experiences I had had so far I thought it was fairly likely.

I'd say I had previously spent 3-4 hours trying on boots. Yesterday I spent about 20 minutes in the Speedmachines before deciding on them. The footbeds took about half an hour to make. I spent a significant amount of time asking questions. After the boots were decided on and footbeds made, the heating and molding of the liners took about 15 minutes. An alignment check and one small adjustment took all of five minutes. Finally, I wore the boots around for another 10 minutes, and we marked the places where punches and/or grinding would be done, and discussed softening the flex.

I'd say I was in the store for about 2.5 hours, with some downtime waiting for an opportunity to do the footbeds, etc.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh784 View Post
Tried on a pair of Nordica Speedmachine 12s that felt better than anything else I've tried on so far. Size 10 foot, went with a size 25.5 boot. Their scale put me at 26.5.
Looks like you're right on the dot there. I have a 10.5 size foot and I use a 26.0 Speedmachine 14. Tried the Speedmachine 12 in size 26.5 for a couple of runs but wanted something tighter so I went down half a notch on the size and got a stiffer flex boot on the SM 14. I love my speedmachines.
post #8 of 26
Excellent and beneficial, thanks. I'm going to point a couple of folks here to read your comments as they are soon to try some on.
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Picked the boots up today - 295mm sole length.

Does anyone have a link to the Tyrolia LD-12 (from Head IM 72) DIN chart?
post #10 of 26
I just bought these boots myself. I find they have a LOT of flex, more than I am used to, but have the most volume of anything I tried on and I have a very wide foot with a high instep. I also bought the 25.5, and have a size 8.5 foot, so wow, yours seem like they will be snug. They had to punch mine as well. But like I said I have a VERY wide foot. I sure do hope these work for me (and you too Josh! Congrats)
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
I've got a very similar foot. I have a wider-than-normal forefoot, and very high instep. Wearing the boots around last night, I noticed a significant amount of pressure over my arches, to the point that my left foot went to sleep. Going skiing today () so I'll see if they pack out and become any more comfortable, but I have a feeling that a trip back to the bootfitters will be in order.

You must be a bigger guy than I am...I'm 150lb and they felt pretty stiff in the store. Now that they're softened they feel much softer, but it will be interesting to see how much they stiffen up on the mountain, especially considering the clear plastic construction. One annoying thing is that the left boot squeaks a lot when I flex it...hoping it will just go away.

Josh
post #12 of 26
not much bigger but have skiied for 50 years and in very stiff race boots. The new boots allow for much more flex to go with the new skis that don't require as much forward pressure. These are the first boots I have tried that don't cramp my arches. I feel like you may have got a full size too short for you.

If they did not grind them, they told me that they can reheat them and they will go back to the original shape, so maybe you could try a 26.6 before sking in these. I have never found instep presssure to cease. The pain can be managed a bit by orthotics that support your arch and don't allow the boot to flatten it, but....

After my years skiing, I found that if your feet hurt, you can't ski well, so unless you plan a minute and a half slalom run and then loosen them, it is better to get something that does not hurt, even if it means you sacrafice a bit of performance, because then at least you can ski for a few hours.

See what the shop says about swapping them out if necessary

Just my experience FWIW
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh784 View Post
Finally pulled the trigger on some new boots today in Sturtevant's. Tried on a pair of Nordica Speedmachine 12s that felt better than anything else I've tried on so far. Size 10 foot, went with a size 25.5 boot. Their scale put me at 26.5.

I left them in the shop to pick up on friday...They're going to punch out a little more room for my big toe, and create a bit more room around the forefoot in the left boot, as that is my bigger foot and I noticed some pain there in the shop. I also asked them to soften the boots slightly. I'm 150lb, and the 110 flex felt marginally too stiff in the shop, so it would definitely be too stiff on the mountain. On the off chance that they do end up feeling too soft, I can always crank them up to the stiffer setting.

Went with Comformable custom footbeds - WOW! I honestly did not expect good footbeds to make as much difference as they did. I have a very high instep, so I may notice the difference more than others. All I know is that after putting the boots back on with the new footbeds installed, they felt 10 times better.

Now I just have to hope I have enough money left to go skiing!


Josh
congratulations Josh! It seems to me that you bought the correct size. It is the most important thing. I have a size 10 foot and the Nordica scale put me at 26.5 too. If your shop put you in the smaller size i'd say that they know what they're doing.
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
I went skiing yesterday and was in a world of pain for the first few hours. After that it became more dull and my feet went to sleep. My right foot felt pretty good by the end of the day, other than my big toe being pretty sore. Left foot had the same issue with the big toe, and lots of pressure over my arch.

When I take the boots back to the shop, I'm guessing they can create more big toe room, and maybe create some more room under the footbeds so my feet can sit a little lower and create more room for my arch.

Josh
post #15 of 26
I sure hope so Josh. But I think they sold you a one size too short pair, especially if your foot measures out to a 26.5 AND is wide as well. Did they not have the larger shell when you went in to purchase?
They can grind out the bottom of your footbeds,a nd grind the boots too, but I was told they could just heat the shells and the boots would return to normal, so if they are really that bad (which it sounds like to me) I would see if they will take them back if you trade up to larger pair. Seems like if they are the ones that insisted this was the size you should have, they should take them back once you have deomostrated that they do NOT fit you.
post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
They've already ground several places in the shells, so I doubt they would take them back. At the end of the season, if they still aren't working for me, their policy is that they'll start over with a new pair of boots, so I have that assurance.

They didn't have hardly anything in a 26 shell. The last time I went in there, they had me shell fit some boots that wouldn't have really worked for my foot, but determined that a 26 shell would probably be the way to go. Unfortunately I had plans to go skiing, and was bootless, so I went with the 25 shell under the impression that it might take a while, but they could make it work.

I do have a wide foot, but before I even took them skiing they made the left boot a bit wider in the forefoot, and I didn't notice any pain width wise when I was on the mountain.

Josh
post #17 of 26
I think that is the right size. Are you unbuckling on the lifts? In a triple-downsized boot, it is often necessary.

I would have cautioned you to ski them before having them softened, but that ship has sailed.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
At the start of the day I was, towards the end it wasn't so necessary as my arches hurt less, it was mostly just my big toes and unbuckling wouldn't have done much to help that.

I'm pretty happy with the stiffness of the boots now. If anything, they are definitely not too soft, and they are still set on the soft setting, so I can change them to the hard setting if I want more stiffness.
post #19 of 26
I think you're overestimating the difference that the flex adjuster will make, but if the current flex suits you, then great.

Give the liners time to pack out. I bought my uncle Speedmachine 10s last year, and the liner was pretty beefy. I have to assume yours are similar. When all that heel and ankle padding packs in a bit, I think you'll be very happy with your size choice.

It was different in fitting my Dobermanns, as there is absolutely no padding, and the liner will not pack out. If I had fit issues, it meant more grinding or stretching.

Good luck, and enjoy!
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
The liners are pretty beefy, but I think even after they do pack out, my big toes will still need more room, the pressure was that severe. They're still bruised from skiing on Saturday.

I'm torn between whether or not I should have more room made for my arches this week. I don't want to do more work on the boots than is necessary, but on the other hand I am heading home for three weeks over Christmas, and plan to do a lot of skiing in that time. I won't be able to take the boots back to the store until Jan 3 after I head home, and I'd hate to be skiing in as much pain as I was last Saturday over Christmas break.

Thanks for the advice,
Josh
post #21 of 26
If you have your old boots, that fit, take them along too. Then it won't be a total loss if you are in too much Pain in your new boots.

Been there done that (too many times) I simply don't believe you have to be in pain to have a boot fit right. Unless you are in need of the performance that a racer is, you simply do not need to subject your feet to this crap. You cannot ski well when you are in pain, period. Contrary to what some macho folks feel, you are not a wuss to get a boot that is comfortable. WAY too many times I was talked into a boot that was too tight for my foot. Ultimately I never finished a season in those boots. Sure when I went with a longer shell, they eventually packed out and were too big, but not until the season (or even more) was up. So which boot ended up being the better deal?
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Singing in the Rain View Post
If you have your old boots, that fit, take them along too. Then it won't be a total loss if you are in too much Pain in your new boots.

Been there done that (too many times) I simply don't believe you have to be in pain to have a boot fit right. Unless you are in need of the performance that a racer is, you simply do not need to subject your feet to this crap. You cannot ski well when you are in pain, period. Contrary to what some macho folks feel, you are not a wuss to get a boot that is comfortable. WAY too many times I was talked into a boot that was too tight for my foot. Ultimately I never finished a season in those boots. Sure when I went with a longer shell, they eventually packed out and were too big, but not until the season (or even more) was up. So which boot ended up being the better deal?
Problem many have when the get new boots like this and downsize, they now need their ski bindings adjusted, so the old boots will not fit unless they have one of the system plates like the railflex that can be adjusted on the mountain easier. If the bindings needed redrilled, then you have to have a 2nd pair of skis in the quiver that still are mounted up for the old boots.
post #23 of 26
ugh that would be a pain, but I have never remounted to adjust from a 26 to a 25. I just carry a screwdriver with multiple heads in my pack
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
This is the only pair of boots I have...I sold my old ones to pay for these. I have railflex bindings, so adjusting them isn't a problem, but I don't have any other boots to adjust them to.
post #25 of 26
Well shoot kiddo I hope you are not in a world of hurt when you should be out having a blast. Do your best, but I think you have to eat these anyway - so go have them dessimate them if needed for you to be pain free (or at least in only minor pain) They can deform them quite a bit, and can grind out the bottom of your inserts. DON'T have them grind under the insteps. The instep pain is from your instep getting crushed downward. If you take that support away they will just crush them down more - ski with the instep unbuckled if need be.

Also those liners can be heat molded some. They should have put you in some toe caps to make your forefoot bigger and heated the liners and had you stand in them for a bit. If they have not done that yet, do it.

If all else fails, see about NO footbed at all, so long as you can relieve the instep pressure by unbuckling.

Good luck.

Hey I have THE worst foot to fit and I have been fitting them into boots for 50 years (OK maybe consciously for 30) but a LONG time OK? You HAVE to be able to feel your feet to ski for more than about an hour, or IMO to ski well at all.
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
They did heat mold the liners when I bought the boots, but no toe caps. The liners have neoprene toe boxes, and if I put just the liner on my foot I can see my big toe poking out. Nevertheless, when I went back to the store today, they shell fit me in a 26 and determined it was probably too big, but with the 25 pretty damn small it's going to take a bit of work.

They're going to make more room in the toe, and I think in the heel also, to allow my foot to sit farther back and create even more room for my toe. They're also going to lower the bits under the liners to allow for more instep room. Fingers crossed that the changes make them comfortable enough to ski for three weeks over break.

Thanks,
Josh
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