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New Marker Comp 20.0 Bindings

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So....

I ordered Marker Comp 1800 bindings for some new skis in august, when the skis came in and were mounted, they had Marker WC 20.0 bindings... shop didn't say anything, parents picked them up.

Anyway, the 1800s were like 8-18 and I was going to run them about 11 or 12 and leave some room for increase if need be, hopefully gain some weight.

The 20.0 bindings run 11-20.

I'm not sure what to do here.

I'm 6 ft, 165lbs and a decent racer, I race more college than USSA but I'd say 100 maybe 120 points if I raced a full season of USSA races. I've had 1400s pre-release on me several times with DIN at 9 before I started turning them up to 11 or so. To get the same 'peace of mind' on looks I only need about a 8 or maybe 9.
post #2 of 14
If your not comfortable skiing at 11 swap em out with the lower din. It's not like your going to need 18+. I'm 6-3 220 and ski aggressively and try to keep my din as low as possible without blowing out. I used to be about 200-210 (80's-90's) and skied around 11.5 or 12.5 now my din is set in the 10 range. If you can't stand in your ski and twist out of your toe at a DIN 11 I'd say they're too high unless your running gates on hard snow.
post #3 of 14
I'd probably keep the 20.0's if I were you. They are just a better built binding than the 14's. That is kind of unfortunate that they discontinued the 18's.

They will work fine set on 11 or 12. You may want to get those binders torque tested though... I've had 2 pair of 18's where the release values didn't correspond accurately with the scale marked on the window of the binding.

Now.... another issue altogether.. regarding your confidence level with the bindings: If you don't feel confident on Markers (regardless of the setting), but you are confident with Look, you should use Look.

I personally don't worry too much about the number. I run Markers at 12, I stay in, and I'm confident in them. Could I run Looks on 9 or 10? Maybe... I don't know... but it doesn't matter to me what they are set on, as long as they stay on when they should and come off when they should.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
I'd probably keep the 20.0's if I were you. They are just a better built binding than the 14's. That is kind of unfortunate that they discontinued the 18's.

They will work fine set on 11 or 12. You may want to get those binders torque tested though... I've had 2 pair of 18's where the release values didn't correspond accurately with the scale marked on the window of the binding.

Now.... another issue altogether.. regarding your confidence level with the bindings: If you don't feel confident on Markers (regardless of the setting), but you are confident with Look, you should use Look.

I personally don't worry too much about the number. I run Markers at 12, I stay in, and I'm confident in them. Could I run Looks on 9 or 10? Maybe... I don't know... but it doesn't matter to me what they are set on, as long as they stay on when they should and come off when they should.

Did they really discontinue the 18's? That's very unfortunate...
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
Did they really discontinue the 18's? That's very unfortunate...
As far as I know...

I know only the 20.0's were available in the U.S. this season. (probably the 30's too, but I can't imagine they sell alot of those : )
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

They will work fine set on 11 or 12. You may want to get those binders torque tested though... I've had 2 pair of 18's where the release values didn't correspond accurately with the scale marked on the window of the binding.
That sounds good, I'm fine/confident with them on an 11 or 12, I'll definitely have them torque tested, maybe the looks too just for comparison because as you said, I don't care what the setting is as long as it's the right one to be functional.

Although what's the point of a DIN standard if they're not 'standard'... oh well.
post #7 of 14
DIN standard is standard for an unweighted test. In testing release values you put a boot into and unweighted system then proceed to test twisting and forward release. A Marker set at 9 will release at the same point as a Look at 9. That is DURING the test. Once you weight the system things change a bit. First of all, Marker contends that elastic travel is an enemy of bindings and limits travel as much as possible. That often gets called pre-release. The binding is releasing as soon as the neccessary amount of pressure is applied to the binding. Other manufacturers (Look, Salomon, etc.) use elastic travel to allow the boot to move laterally within the binding a few millimeters and still recenter. Those bindings also release at the same value as the Markers but they allow for the movement that skiing generates within a binding thereby keeping you in the system a bit longer though it will release once the boot applies the needed pressure (the same amount as Marker) without releasing the pressure.

It's kind of a short answer and one that is often debated by followers of Marker vs. everyone else.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierhj View Post
DIN standard is standard for an unweighted test. In testing release values you put a boot into and unweighted system then proceed to test twisting and forward release. A Marker set at 9 will release at the same point as a Look at 9. That is DURING the test. Once you weight the system things change a bit. First of all, Marker contends that elastic travel is an enemy of bindings and limits travel as much as possible. That often gets called pre-release. The binding is releasing as soon as the neccessary amount of pressure is applied to the binding. Other manufacturers (Look, Salomon, etc.) use elastic travel to allow the boot to move laterally within the binding a few millimeters and still recenter. Those bindings also release at the same value as the Markers but they allow for the movement that skiing generates within a binding thereby keeping you in the system a bit longer though it will release once the boot applies the needed pressure (the same amount as Marker) without releasing the pressure.

It's kind of a short answer and one that is often debated by followers of Marker vs. everyone else.
Funny, I was adjusting the forward pressure on my 1800's yesterday and I noticed that the heel piece did not move backward at all when the boot was in, unlike most bindings.

Does anyone know how to gauge proper forward pressure on the Markers?
post #9 of 14
When you click your boot in, the adjustment screw should recess slightly into the heel housing.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Proneax View Post
So....

I ordered Marker Comp 1800 bindings for some new skis in august, when the skis came in and were mounted, they had Marker WC 20.0 bindings... shop didn't say anything, parents picked them up.

Anyway, the 1800s were like 8-18 and I was going to run them about 11 or 12 and leave some room for increase if need be, hopefully gain some weight.

The 20.0 bindings run 11-20.

I'm not sure what to do here.

I'm 6 ft, 165lbs and a decent racer, I race more college than USSA but I'd say 100 maybe 120 points if I raced a full season of USSA races. I've had 1400s pre-release on me several times with DIN at 9 before I started turning them up to 11 or so. To get the same 'peace of mind' on looks I only need about a 8 or maybe 9.
I agree that you should stick with what makes you confident in your equipment. But I would be more confident knowing your skis aren't going to leave you in a race! When I raced in HS I was a stick, 6'1" but a stick, and I used to crank up my bindings as high as they would go, but there wasn't as easy access to bindings with dins like the 1800, 2.0, or 3000. I blew out more times than I care to remember, so I say lock those things on your feet and make sure both of your skis are on your feet when you finish the race! If you go down to a consumer binding like the 14 you will be getting a binding that just is not as well built, lot of plastic where the 2.0 will have metal!
post #11 of 14
As far as I know, according to my local Marker guy, the 18.0s were changed to become the 20.0s...
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by gotamagal View Post
As far as I know, according to my local Marker guy, the 18.0s were changed to become the 20.0s...
Exactly, they replaced the 18, but the problem for the original poster is the slighly higher din setting on the 20.0
post #13 of 14
Funny, I checked the 06/07 price list at the shop today and it seems like the 18.0 is still available in Canada. There's no mention of the 20.0 at all. Maybe deal with a shop in Canada that can get the 18.0 for you.

Unless the price list is wrong...
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski-2-fly View Post
I If you can't stand in your ski and twist out of your toe at a DIN 11 I'd say they're too high
That is pretty much the worst method possible for setting your bindings other than just sticking a screwdriver in, closing your eyes and turning a random number of times.
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