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"the fall line" - Page 2

post #31 of 43
btw - my builtin detector would essentially be a bubble level. But we could gussy it up with electronics and LEDs for added effect .
post #32 of 43
Middle school kids seem to be great fall line detectors.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
As you can see, the gradient vector is the direction you must take to maximize in a negative sense (minimize) the substantive derivative of the Elevation function (F). Note the first term is only a factor during heavy snow storms.
Also note, in the above over simplification, the affect of the gradient on skier velocity (u) is left to the interested student.

This is a joke, right?
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
btw - my builtin detector would essentially be a bubble level. But we could gussy it up with electronics and LEDs for added effect .

OR, you ccould just flatten you skis and let gravity do its thing
post #35 of 43
Who does this when they ski? Too much theory and not any skiing happening?
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
Who does this when they ski? Too much theory and not any skiing happening?
noone, this has become a math thread, as the original question was satisfactorily answered in the first few posts.
post #37 of 43
Thread Starter 
i thought it was vitally important...maybe i'll think about it more when i'm in the backcountry at Alta, or Teton...but for now i'll haul ass on the groomers in NC! thanks for the explanation, but it's more confusing now then it ever was...who needs algebra?...i'm sure the SkiNC crew can help me out at our next safety meeting...
post #38 of 43
I was exhibitng my fairly dry sense of humor when I started the math thing. The math thing does help me think about one crucial issue though. The fall line is a constant property of the hill. It doesn't move for different skiers, or bowling balls, or water. What does change as velocity changes is the direction a bowling ball or water would take from a particular point. Imagine a hill that was a flat plane with a modeerate constant pitch. If you dropped a bowling ball on it frm a dead standstill the bowling ball would go straight downhill, following the fall line. Now, imagine dropping that same bowling ball while you are moving in a traverse. The ball would start out moving across the hill and begin moving in a parabolic path down the hill. what this means to a skier is that the point at which the skier needs to add force to move the skis down the hill into a new turn is somewhere past the fall line. Above that point the skis need to be neutral or edged for the old turn.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyboy View Post
This is a joke, right?
Yes, but FOG started it (still true though), and it's not algebra. It's calculus.
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Yes, but FOG started it (still true though), and it's not algebra. It's calculus.
No wonder I was having so much trouble.
post #41 of 43
Fog,
Nice image but the "control phase" starts well before the fall line. Waiting until after the fall line to add force is a common mistake. Ideally we need to add that force during the middle third of the turn. Yes we are still redirecting the skis during that last half but the turn is defined by what we do during the first half (how actively we add force).
post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Yes, but FOG started it (still true though), and it's not algebra. It's calculus.
This statment stills wories me, buy "still true though" you're not refering to the equation you posted?
post #43 of 43
I totally want to ski those surfaces! I'll submit them to my local terrain park grooming team.
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