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Just Bought 07 Stockli Scot Schmidt's - Am I Sc&$^ed? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
To echo what AD just said, but from a slightly different slant, there aren't many folks riding Stocklis, so you'll at the very least stand out on the hill.

But I'd also take XEC's advice. Ride 'em a few times to see how you like 'em.
post #32 of 59
Thread Starter 
Folks,

Thanks for all the great posts, they have been tremendously helpful (this is a great discussion board!).

At this point, I think I am going to keep the SS boards and ski them. I am a little nervous about how they will do in the bumps, but given that I ski bumps mostly when there is soft snow, and the fact that I am not a "zipper line" bump skier, I am hoping that things will not be so bad!
post #33 of 59
SK:

I'm far, far, far from being a zipperhead.

I used to ski bumps, though, on 198 Rossi 7S's, so I think you'll be fine with your SS.

That said, you didn't buy the SS to be a bump ski, did you? If that was your main reason for buying the ski, hmmmm....

post #34 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
SK:

I'm far, far, far from being a zipperhead.

I used to ski bumps, though, on 198 Rossi 7S's, so I think you'll be fine with your SS.

That said, you didn't buy the SS to be a bump ski, did you? If that was your main reason for buying the ski, hmmmm....

Hey dookey,

Bought the SS mostly as an all mountain ski. I do spend some time in the bumps (about 1/4 of my time), but mostly when the bumps are soft (i.e. not VW ice sculptures). Wanted something that could handle crud, pow, skied out runs, ungroomed, some groomed etc. Guy in the store (who I know pretty - he has been working on my boots for years) thought the SS's would be a good choice for West Coast (Squaw/Alpine) skiing
post #35 of 59
right on.

did you purchase them in Tahoe?
post #36 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
right on.

did you purchase them in Tahoe?
Yep, I purchased them over at Squaw Creek Sports.
post #37 of 59
When in doubt, get better abdominals.
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
That mounting forward thing that Noodler suggests is what the Stockli importer for Oz was suggesting too. I love stocklis but Stormriders are such a pain to turn at slow speeds, and that was his "fix" for the problem.

Funny you should mention that. Fred set up my Stormrider XL's (@174cm) and turn intiation is as easy, if not easier than on my 05 Volkl AC3's (@170cm). Due to a lack of snow last Oz winter, I haven't yet tried them in the bumps, but my impression to date is that they just rock (Ditto to what Noodler said).
post #39 of 59
Yeah, Fred had a bee in his bonnet about the forward mount. He wanted to do that with my SCs (because I got them in a longer length than 'my' length) but I wouldn't let him. With Stormies though, I'd do it for sure. I do a lot of skiing at slow speeds, and I demoed the old brown Stormies for teaching and they just didn't recognise my turn signals at all. At normal speeds, they're fine. At teaching speeds, they're not.

I'd sure love a Stormrider that felt like the SC.
post #40 of 59
Beyond:
you may be correct, I don't really follow what goes on in the U.S. But I have seen ads describing DPS as biggest baddest stiffest etc. Either way Stockli in both the U.S and Canada is really private distributors that make their own decisions. In Canada there really isn't any advertising but still the brand is growing from where it was five years ago when I first started selling it. Either way point really was that the ski is easy to ski and no one should be frightened away. Very approachable ski.
post #41 of 59
Snowkarma

I own a pair of SS's in the same length as yours. I am 6' 185 lbs. level 8 skier. I am comfortable skiing the whole mountain on and off piste. Most of my skiing is out west; Mammoth, Tahoe, Alta, Snowbird, Park City...

The SS is a lot of ski... even in a 178. Don't let anybody tell you otherwise. If you have a solid technique they are a lot of fun to ride but get back and the SS will throw you on your ass in a hurry. They are unbelievable in crud (steamrollers), flat out don't like bumps and will handle any speed you are willing throw at 'em. If I have ever skied on an "expert" ski, this would be the one. Not impossible to cruise around on... just not all that much fun unless you are pushing them hard IMO.

I have a set of Volkl AC4's that, by comparison, feel like a stroll in the park. 10 years ago the SS would have been more to my liking. I am wimping out and selling my SS's. I scare myself on those bad boyz.

<M
post #42 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moods View Post
Snowkarma

I own a pair of SS's in the same length as yours. I am 6' 185 lbs. level 8 skier. I am comfortable skiing the whole mountain on and off piste. Most of my skiing is out west; Mammoth, Tahoe, Alta, Snowbird, Park City...

The SS is a lot of ski... even in a 178. Don't let anybody tell you otherwise. If you have a solid technique they are a lot of fun to ride but get back and the SS will throw you on your ass in a hurry. They are unbelievable in crud (steamrollers), flat out don't like bumps and will handle any speed you are willing throw at 'em. If I have ever skied on an "expert" ski, this would be the one. Not impossible to cruise around on... just not all that much fun unless you are pushing them hard IMO.

I have a set of Volkl AC4's that, by comparison, feel like a stroll in the park. 10 years ago the SS would have been more to my liking. I am wimping out and selling my SS's. I scare myself on those bad boyz.

<M
Moods,

Thanks so much for the info. Could you tell me what year you Schmidts are?

Thanks!

SK
post #43 of 59
Too bad you plunked down on 'em already...

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=68860
post #44 of 59

Stockli feedback

I have been a Stockli skier for five years, having come off of Rossi, Volant, Volkl, Atomic and Dynastar. At the time I was an intermediate+, and the Stockli skis have moved me to a solid expert and Masters racer (5 h/c NASTAR, upper third Masters results). All Stocklis ask a few things of the skier: stay balanced and centered, look ahead, don't panic in tight or gnarly spots, and tip 'em & rip 'em. They are not nearly as hard to ski as their reputation implies, and are very supple--they rebound nicely after a smooth progressive flex. There is no better edge grip in their race skis, and their XL line can do it all. There is no more trustworthy ski when headed for steep and deep, chunky, death cookies, late day chop, etc. When headed for bad terrain, just plan to turn as normal and the skis take you through with minimal deflection.

I am 47 years old (wow, when did that happen!!), 5-11, 210, very strong athletically and now a good skier overall. Once you demo Stockli, you may find as I did that from race skis to all mountain to freeride, they become your trusted friend, willing accomplice, and set of tools that make your better with each day on snow. Swiss design and craftsmanship at its best.
post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
Too bad you plunked down on 'em already...

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=68860
Holy Sh!t! : - this can't be for real. I'm in Denver and I'm going to follow-up with this guy and see if he's spewing BS or if he's got the stuff.

Oh my poor aching wallet...
post #46 of 59
Keep us posted.

Stocklis are prolly not in the cards for me this season...but who knows.
post #47 of 59
You guys are making me jones for snow. I've got a new pair of Cross' to lay down some turns with.
post #48 of 59
join the list of Jones!
post #49 of 59
I'll throw in my 2 cents, which may or may not help with your buyers remorse. I skied the Stormrider AT last year and...I think Stockli's get their reputation for being stubborn b/c they are so darn solid on edge. When turning, your edge is so sure that you do sort of think, "hmmm, it may be challenging to initiate my next turn." I don't think this is a bad thing, however. Especially if you like ripping medium to long turns in variable conditions. I think you will find that they are extremely solid underfoot and will truly be impressed by edge hold and how smooth they are.
post #50 of 59
Thread Starter 
Once again folks, thanks so much for the input/feedback/opinion. This is truly an awesome forum

Every day I walk into my garage to get into my car, I have to walk past my brand new SSs just waiting to be used... Talk about jonesing for the slopes! Now if we would only get a major dump in the Sierras....
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowkarma View Post
Moods,

Thanks so much for the info. Could you tell me what year you Schmidts are?

Thanks!

SK
Mine are 06 models... exactly the same as this years model. I don't want to take anything away from the SS... they are incredible. In wide open spaces, crud and powder they are as good as any ski I have ridden. They also hold incredibly well on hard pack for a wider ski. The SS is a ballsy ski to be sure but they can be a heck of a lot of fun.

Enjoy!

<M
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moods View Post
Mine are 06 models... exactly the same as this years model. I don't want to take anything away from the SS... they are incredible. In wide open spaces, crud and powder they are as good as any ski I have ridden. They also hold incredibly well on hard pack for a wider ski. The SS is a ballsy ski to be sure but they can be a heck of a lot of fun.
Tips are a bit softer this year (07).
post #53 of 59
The skis that went to ski tests last year were a pre-production version, the production ski was the SAME as this year. No change. The pre-production ski was extra stiff the real ski was more managable.
post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
The skis that went to ski tests last year were a pre-production version, the production ski was the SAME as this year. No change. The pre-production ski was extra stiff the real ski was more managable.
So where does the claim that the tips have been softend come form? This is just what I was told when looking into this year's stormridders, so I assumed that it came from stlocki.
post #55 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyboy View Post
So where does the claim that the tips have been softend come form? This is just what I was told when looking into this year's stormridders, so I assumed that it came from stlocki.
For what little it is worth, the store from which I bought my SS's also claimed that the tip was softer this year.
post #56 of 59

Scott schmidt impressions

so, I owned last years 178 SS and loved it.
I'm 6ft, 168lbs, finesse skier with skills but not overly agressive.
I'm a level 3 ski instructor specializing in off piste instruction for All Mountains Ski Pros with Eric DesLauriers.

anyway, the SS was a great feeling all around fat ski.
I actually liked my Nordica top fuel a bit more, so I sold the SS , but they are still great and I wish I wouldn't have sold em.

the thing about this ski is it likes more traditional movement patterns. one of the things I mean by that is it likes to be flexed, not just passively stood on and ridden. it really likes quick input, almost like a traditional slalom ski. when it's given the input, it shines and the flex and feel are trancendent. when it's parked and ridden, it's not as good a ski as many of the more shapely damp skis like the nordicas...

Anyway, you have a great ski and if it doesn't work for you, give me a call, I want another pair... they made me smile a lot.

cheers,

wade
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowkarma View Post
Every day I walk into my garage to get into my car, I have to walk past my brand new SSs just waiting to be used... Talk about jonesing for the slopes!
Tell me about it

I've had my pair of 188 SSs looking at me since mid september, impatiently waiting for snow :

But today my season began, and I could do my first high speed turns. So far I'm loving every bit of them
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
Now for my "controversial" post. I'll just pass along that I if you do find them a bit difficult on turn initiation you should consider remounting the bindings forward. I did just that on my Stockli XLs (by 25mm) and it completely changed the character of the ski. The tail that had felt overly stiff became incredibly manageable (especially in the bumps). The turn initiation that seemed lethargic (the skis would tend to run away on me) became quite snappy. There's lot's of posts about the value of a BoF binding mount position so please use the search engine and review what's been discussed (and let's not get into it in this thread where it doesn't belong).
I find this odd, although it may differ by Model. But my Stocki laser WC SL's in a 166 are mounted farther forward then any other slalom ski on the market and they are mounted exactly correctly by the Stockli book for my boot sole length.
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
I find this odd, although it may differ by Model. But my Stocki laser WC SL's in a 166 are mounted farther forward then any other slalom ski on the market and they are mounted exactly correctly by the Stockli book for my boot sole length.
It certainly could vary by model (where Stockli decides to put the midsole mark).

My DP's marks were a bit further rearward than the XL's (relatively) so I would assume that it's completely dependent on the model.
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