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Is a coach ever wrong, and what to do about it

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My fifteen y.o. daughter and I just bought all new gs equipment this past weekend. It was necessity. The race team coach went with us, he knows her skiing better than anyone, right? Well, we walked off with (non race stock) equipe 2V in a 160. At 4'11" and 105#, these are a good 3" over the top of her head. As most J2's still competing, she is a good skier. She is best on her team but no where near the top of the pack in her age group.

Does this seem like too much ski for her? If it is, do I just go along to get along, or go out and spend more $ on another ski. I highly suspect the coach would not admit to making a mistake. (It may not be mistake) What would you do?
post #2 of 14
I don't understand what is your question. Do you think the skis are too long, too short, too stiff, not suited to her ability levels ?

I talk with a lot of athletes who are younger than your daughter (being a coach and all) and they all seem to be using something substantially longer (for the gals who are competing in the major comps and that kick my butt) or about in that size range if they don't have the technique/weight/need to drive something bigger. I weight around 145 and ski a stiff 178 FIS Fischer altough I should ski a 183 (I'm lazy like that...): Sallies are pretty soft, even in woman's length (182), only the LAB 187 is very stiff, so your daughter should be happy with these skis, unless she really gains wieght/height next summer. 160 is even short for real steup GS.
post #3 of 14
J-2 .... ain't a legal ski assuming that she's USSA?
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Let me clarify a little. My concern is the ski is too much for her ability level. I know the salomon is a little softer than most which gives me comfort. Last year she skied 148 Fisher race stock and it was too stiff for her. At 15 and 4'11" she is a little bitty thing. She is definately not of caliber as most really good racers. She finished in bottom 3rd of last year's loveland derby in slalom.

Thank you for your input Billy Ray, that is the exact type answer I was looking for.
post #5 of 14
You live in Texas and your kid races USSA?! Sign me up for that...
post #6 of 14
Glad that I could be of service. There's no point in trying to make her race longer boards or stiffer boards than she needs to, especially since she isn't sponsored and doesn't need to adhere to specific rules. And even then, I'm sure that you could find softer skis that would work. But there's also no point in making her race a 143 gs at 15 years old: I remember the time when athletes this young race 180+ skis in slalom... Pick a softer flexing brand and you're set.

PS: When I said younger, I meant 14.
post #7 of 14
This is the "whirlwind" time of year. I guess the key is knowing what will be expected of her. She may be from Texas (not that there is anything wrong with that though ), but to put the question in perspective, is she going to a "Winter Term" at one of the race schools?

Is she racing USSA and if so, how tough are they in her region regarding "legal skis"? If she is in a division that is prone to challenges, she may find herself stopped dead at the starter. USSA is urging all of the event sponsors to have some degree of checking for legal gear. Each state and region are different and that was a major issue in Pennsylvania and kids who were not on legal gear were gettiing the boot .... not allowed to race. Up in New England (where my son is a J-2), he has to be "legal" bacause his team requires it ..... but .... he tells me that there is some selective enforcement, that is, if you are a true contender, you need to be legal .... some kids ... well, they just look the other way.

Deb Armstrong said in essence, that we are (by fighting the FIS), not doing our kids a favor in the long run.

Last few seasons, the fur started flying on this issue and my son too, is a lightweight but there was a "silver lining" ... on softer race legal gear, the PA kids on my sons team (booted out of a whole season), did very well on some of the skis. Dawgcatching (on Epic), set my son up with a set of legal Blizzard skis ..... those were passed on ... to the kid who got the boot and he is very small for his age, however he skis at a very high level.

So, does she need to be legal in New Mexico (Taos), if so, the coach erred; if not the choice may be a good one. Additionally, how soft are the conditions out there; here ice is the norm, not the exception?
post #8 of 14
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Anyone want to sign up for the Taxi service. We have driven 6.5 hours each way, every weekend from Thanksgiving to April first for 3 years. Not counting the 10-12 hour drives from far west Colorado. We were racing USSA at J-3 and J-4 with some good results. As, I said we are finally completely outclassed and will be racing primary unoffcial "fun" races and nastar type races.
post #10 of 14
That ski sounds right. If she were more aggressive, she could go longer. Forget height, but at 105 lbs. a 160 is no problem.
post #11 of 14
Based on the limited info, I also don't see an issue with the ski. As she gets faster, I think she should work her way up to FIS reg size. 20 cm to go..

This is also something for J3 mom's and dad's to consider when getting equipment. If your son/daughter will likely continue to race, then moving up in size at the J3 level is probably a good thing; it avoids the size shock that can come at the J2 level.

PS - As a first-year J2, there's still plenty of opportunity for "feel good" moments based on technique/tactic break-throughs, learning to try one's best, etc. And, it's a more mature perspective on sport & life. After all, very few of us are #1 in our professions, sports, or hobbies, but we still enjoy them.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by dady8tor View Post
Anyone want to sign up for the Taxi service. We have driven 6.5 hours each way, every weekend from Thanksgiving to April first for 3 years. Not counting the 10-12 hour drives from far west Colorado. We were racing USSA at J-3 and J-4 with some good results. As, I said we are finally completely outclassed and will be racing primary unoffcial "fun" races and nastar type races.
See you at Steamboat, then, for the NASTAR Nationals If you haven't been its loads of fun and pretty stout competition in most divisions.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the input. That is why I ask here first. I learn a lot. Gary, we went to PC nationals 3 years in row and loved ever minute of it. Missed Steamboat last year because of other committments but we hope to make it this year.
post #14 of 14
To answer your question, yes, coaches are wrong at times. However, this size jump seems long overdue. She'll experience a bit of an adjustment period to the longer size, but she'll still be on a non-FIS sidecut (probably more like a slalom than a true GS) and a fairly soft junior ski. They should be screaming NASTAR skis for her, and she might find herself a little more competitive among her age class. Spend some time reviewing fundamentals and have her slowly work up to race speeds. Once she figures them out, she love them.

Plus, guys dig chicks on long skis.
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