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Sharing Private lesson with child?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I will be be in Park City Dec 16-23rd with my 10 yo daughter and looking for a full day private lesson on the 16th at any of the PC resorts.... PCMR or DV would be best..

I am a 6/7 and my daughter can wedge down any blue ..... We enjoy spending time together on the hill... Does it make any sense to share the lesson with her? :

My group arrives on the 17th so I dont have anyone to watch her......

Thanks

NNN
post #2 of 19
Many, if not most, resorts will do something along those lines. But don't expect your skiing to improve much, if at all, from the lesson. Your daughter is at a fundamentally different skill level than you, and needs to work on basic confidence and basic movements.

In a situation like that, I think most instructors would find it more logical to focus the lessons on improving the child's skiing, and giving you some tips of things to work on. Working heavily with you, he risks frustrating and humiliating your daughter when she needs to build confidence. Unless you have a specific reason to want to stay near your daughter, my advice would be to get separate private lessons. If money is an issue, you may be better off with two half-day lessons in the morning, and spend the afternoon skiing with your daughter.
post #3 of 19
I would say yes because it could help her progress to a higher level.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by codyblank View Post
I would say yes because it could help her progress to a higher level.
I may have misunderstood the question. What is your alternative to taking a lesson together? You take a lesson, and she free skis?
post #5 of 19
I probably misunderstood the question.
post #6 of 19
It makes sense for you to accompany her on HER lesson, to spend time with her and know what she's doing and why. She gets the lesson; you get to accompany her.

It does not make any sense to bring her along for YOUR lesson, imho of course.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by triplenet View Post
I am a 6/7 and my daughter can wedge down any blue ..... We enjoy spending time together on the hill... Does it make any sense to share the lesson with her?
As a long time teacher of both adults and kids, I say No. Adults and Children have different learning styles. In fact, this is one of the hardest lessons for an instuctor to make work. But the key statement here is she can WEDGE down almost any blue. If she's still wedging and your draging here down blue runs, your doing her no favors. You guys are at different skill levels. If you were skiing with me, we'd ski greens most of the day...

Do the right thing. Get seperate lessons for each of you.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
I agree - seperate lessons are best....

I was hoping we could work on my fundamentals one run, then work on hers the next....

When I say she is in a wedge - she is parrallel until the turns - then she uses the wedge to make the turn - then its back to parrallel... No matter - its still a wedge

I will see if she has any interest in ski school that day and take a lesson on my own... Its hard to get her in to ski school with no friends.....

Thanks

NNN
post #9 of 19
since her friends aren't there, you might want to look into a package or "ski-week" type of deal where she will be able to ski with the same group of kids the whole time, making new friends.

Now to your original question, it is usually possible to do a "family" private, however they can be very tricky, especially with the split in abilities between you and your daughter. The biggest problem is that for you to work on terrain appropriate to your level of skiing, your daughter might be overwhelmed, and you may be terribly bored on the terrain that your daughter will benefit from working on. So, can it be done, yes, would I personally recomend it, probably not with the given split in levels.
post #10 of 19
These lessons are always difficult, if the better skiier does not understand that the lesson will happen on the terrain that the least able skiier is comfortable on. And if she's wedging on blues, she should be on greens.

Also, adults and children learn very differently. You might notice that kids' ski school groups are doing things very differently from adult groups. There's a reason for that.
post #11 of 19
Of course the lesson will be geared towards the child. As an instructor, I always encouraged the parent to go ski and come back when the lesson ended. If you pay to be in the lesson, I can't tell you to get lost, but I will be teaching the kid. The only time a parent hung out (not as a paying student, just being there) it was a telemarker who wouldn't 'go ski'. I got him involved and he actually helped a lot, it was a very good lesson. Dad only learned how to teach, not how to ski.
post #12 of 19
I'm not an instructor, but I am a father. My son and I took a private lesson together at Okemo a few years ago. He was 10. It worked fine. It sounds like your daughter is at a similar level. I was interested in seeing what the instructor was going to work on with him. Plus I wanted to learn a little more shaped ski technique as that was just my 2nd season off of straight boards.

The lesson was mostly focused on my son and I got some pointers here and there. A full day might be a bit much. Why not break it up into 2 half days so you have time to free-ski and to work on what you have been taught.
post #13 of 19
Correction, I don't really recall teaching a parent and child with a big difference in skill level, but if I did, I'm sure I tried to give them both some instruction. The lesson I remember had a parent hanging out, and I accepted his presence and it enhanced the child's lesson. He was a good skier and the kid was first day on skis. I could have given him a few drills to try, but the lesson took place on the easiest terrain available and he had only paid for the child's instruction. He didn't ask for tips for himself, but he gave me one.
post #14 of 19
Not a problem, IF the expectation is properly set that we will be working on fun and "matching the skiis like daddy" with the child and re-emphasising fundamentals and elements of skiing with the adult. If they both expect each other to get equal and level appropriate instruction as if it were independent privates then both will be disappointed. If the goal and expectation is properly set it could be the best lesson ever for all three (yes instructors are allowed to enjoy the lesson too).
post #15 of 19
I meant to say what Stache said...
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
As a long time teacher of both adults and kids, I say No. Adults and Children have different learning styles. In fact, this is one of the hardest lessons for an instuctor to make work. But the key statement here is she can WEDGE down almost any blue. If she's still wedging and your draging here down blue runs, your doing her no favors. You guys are at different skill levels. If you were skiing with me, we'd ski greens most of the day...
I think that's what makes this lesson valuable. The parent learns waht does and does notr work for the child and then hopefully stops dragging them onto the blues.
post #17 of 19
If you took such a lesson at our ski school you would have to pay for two persons. I very rearly make any exeptions but it has happened. Im on your side .

There are pros and cons but basicly I think children should not be accompanied by parrents on a lesson. It all depends on the parrent actually. In one case the father told his son not to cross his skis as he was learning to wedge . In some cases the parrents try to continue the lesson afterwards . But if you dont have issues like that I see no problem. One reason the ski school might want to encourage you to join the lesson is that it means more money for the school and the teacher . So be aware of this aspect as well. I was told by a ski school director that they are actually loosing money on one person private lessons .
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
.... One reason the ski school might want to encourage you to join the lesson is that it means more money for the school and the teacher . So be aware of this aspect as well. I was told by a ski school director that they are actually loosing money on one person private lessons .
A two person or three person "private" is probably the most profitable to a ski school depending on the school/instructor split. At my old SS the customer paid 150% of a one person private for a two person private and the instructor got an extra $2 for the extra person, another $2 for a third.

Where privates are not as valuable to a SS (they never lose money) as a group lesson is when they have a group of 8 persons paying $25 each for two hours ($200 gross) and the instructor gets less than $20 (net $180+ for SS) versus an $80 private hour and the instructor gets less than $20 (net $60+ for SS).
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I was told by a ski school director that they are actually loosing money on one person private lessons .
ROTFLMAO

I'd like to see the numbers used to come up with that one. Maybe they can use them as a example at the ESCA (Enron School of Creative Accounting).

Sorry for the hijack, but couldn't resist.
Ken
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