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Skiers/Snowboarders Responsibility Code

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Skiers/Snowboarders Responsibility Code

Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.

People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

You must not stop where you obstruct a trail,or are not visible from above.

Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.

Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.



Please do your best to make this code your highest priority on the mountain. This helps make our sport safer for all of us.
post #2 of 17

Important Things to Know for Beginners

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Skiers/Snowboarders Responsibility Code

Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.

People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

You must not stop where you obstruct a trail,or are not visible from above.

Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.

Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.



Please do your best to make this code your highest priority on the mountain. This helps make our sport safer for all of us.
Knowing and abiding by the responsibility code helps to keep everyone safe. Even for a beginner, it's important to know.

I can remember seeing someone on a beginner's hill going straight down without making any effort to stop (because they didn't know how??) and yelling for people to move out of the way. This could be very dangerous for the person skiing out of control but also for anyone who accidentally crosses their path.

One of the first things to learn to do is how to stop/control your speed.

This is a lot easier to do if you are on a run that corresponds to your ability level. As mentioned in other threads, well meaning friends/family members may suggest you accompany them to a run they are familiar with. If you end up on something that is too difficult for you to cope with at first, you could get hurt, become so frustrated you will quit, etc. I have heard this story so many times....about a first timer being taken to a black diamond run (one guy I know, a snowboarder, made it down safely but it took 4 hours). :

People ahead of you have the right of way...no matter how slow they are going or how unpredictable their movements......it's up to you to stay in control!

You must not stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible.......Beginners have more of a tendency to stop especially when they encounter terrain that scares them. It's ok to stop but do so off on the side of the trail so you are not obstructing anyone. In particular, you must be very careful where you may not be visible.

When merging on to a trail, always check for traffic and yield to others.

Prior to using a lift, you must be able to load and unload safely. It may be easiest to learn how to do this in a lesson. It's not too difficult on skis once you learn where to stand up and that you need to move forward and out of the way. On beginner's lifts though, there is more of a chance of people falling off right in front of you. So, ironically, you may need to not only get off but try to move around them. Usually the lift operators will slow the lift down or stop it completely and help clear away the people but sometimes there isn't always time.
Perhaps other people have suggestions on how to best handle this. I think the best thing to do is just look for a clear path, through the middle, off on one side..just try to avoid the bodies in front of you.

This code is really important to abide by. It's common to see accidents because people don't abide by the code. But, by doing so, you keep yourself and other people safe.
post #3 of 17
Good post GaryZ. This coming season, we have implemented the skiers/snowboarders responsibilty code into our school group lessons. We plan on introducing the the code at the beginning of each lesson, and each week pick a code that the student must be able to recite at the end of his/her lesson in order to pass. Of course they'll still have to pass the skiing portion too!
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post
Good post GaryZ. This coming season, we have implemented the skiers/snowboarders responsibilty code into our school group lessons. We plan on introducing the the code at the beginning of each lesson, and each week pick a code that the student must be able to recite at the end of his/her lesson in order to pass. Of course they'll still have to pass the skiing portion too!
I go into the ski school office and get the code on pocket sized cards and give them to students . We discuss each one ,one at a time at different intervals .
So often an out of control skier or boarder will come through our group and sometimes make contact with one of them . After I ask them how many of the rules did this person break in this one incident.
They learn they must protect themselves from others just as importantly as protecting the safety of others around us.
Awareness of what is going on around you when moving about is the best form of prevention

Look uphill. Look around you. Then go.
post #5 of 17

Awareness While Skiing

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
They learn they must protect themselves from others just as importantly as protecting the safety of others around us.
Awareness of what is going on around you when moving about is the best form of prevention
This probably means that you don't think it's a good idea to be listening to music while you ski???
post #6 of 17
Printing the code on cards is a great idea Gary! We're going to be printing new business cards this season and I'm going to suggest adding that.

I've skied for over 36 years and up until a couple of years ago, I had never heard of a Skiers Responsibility Code. I never noticed that it was in fine print on the back of the lift ticket. I think that it's extremely important information that all skiers should learn. After losing a kid at our ski area last year, I think that most people will be pretty happy that we're making our students aware of their responsibilities when they're on the hill.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgmc View Post
This probably means that you don't think it's a good idea to be listening to music while you ski???
Yeah . That is true. I think we owe it to the people around us to be aware of them . When I overcome a skier on a narrow trail or skiing fast with a partner I will call out the side I intend to pass on and see if they allow for some space. If they can't hear it just makes passing a bit more complicated and you have to pick a moment and leave lots of space.
I enjoy music but think we should be fully capable of hearing those around us for the protection of all parties.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgmc View Post
This probably means that you don't think it's a good idea to be listening to music while you ski???
Being from the OLD school, I don't think it's a good idea. When I started wearing a helmet, the first thing that bothered me was some loss of hearing. I like knowing when someone behind me is gaining on me on some cat track. If you add music to the mix, I think it's even worse.
post #9 of 17
Well, I listen to music, but I also wear a bright orange vest with DEAF SKIER in big black letters on the back.
post #10 of 17
I love to listen to music while I ski. I am conscious, though, of how much more aware I am if I'm not listening to music. I got hit by a snowboarder at one point on a semi-crowded run. I think I might have avoided him if I hadn't been listening to music because I'm aware of how much more alert/aware I am without music. So, these days, I only put the music on if I'm on a fairly empty run.....
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Well, I listen to music, but I also wear a bright orange vest with DEAF SKIER in big black letters on the back.
Nice. I think you could mitigate the loss of sensual awareness of headphones by the level of operation and being aware of your reduced capacity. Checking more often to see who and what is around you. Drop them off of your ears in traffic and skiing in much less occupied areas.
The level of operation would be the biggest factor. I used to wear headphones at work but set them at a level that I could also communicate with people around me. Another way is to set the ear buds lower on our ear lobe so you hear the music as much as you hear the world around you.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Beginners shouldn't listen to music . They got enough to think and be aware of . I would think they would want to savor and use every bit of sensual input they could absorb.
I was wrong in not pointing that out. I forgot where I was posting . My bad.
post #13 of 17
I agree that new skiers would most likely be more comfortable and feel safer without headphone music. But it's a personal choice. If everyone obeyed The Code it wouldn't be a safety issue. Using headphones does not violate The Code.
post #14 of 17

Beginners and music

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Beginners shouldn't listen to music . They got enough to think and be aware of .
I agree with this. There is too much for beginners to be focused on to have any kind of distractions.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Well, I listen to music, but I also wear a bright orange vest with DEAF SKIER in big black letters on the back.
SRSLY? That is brilliant.
Quote:
If everyone obeyed The Code it wouldn't be a safety issue. Using headphones does not violate The Code.
I sort of disagree with this. The literature has some evidence that listening to music slows reaction times and even has adverse effects on vision. It might not violate the Skier's Code, but technology hadn't made this situation common when the code was written. Listening to headphones IS against the rules for drivers, and drivers of heavy trucks are even required to be hearing people.

Note: I'm strongly opposed to any rule making on this. The freedoms skiing allows us are to be cherished and protected even in the face of safety issues. After all, skiing is risky and it isn't mandatory.
post #16 of 17
[quote=Garrett;782564The literature has some evidence that listening to music slows reaction times and even has adverse effects on vision.[/quote]

Oh yeah?
What about listening to Black Sabbath on 78 speed man!?
post #17 of 17
Holy old post batman. You might need to check the methodology in those papers and ensure they adequately represented the RAWK.
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