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sking backwards

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
ok guys, whats the trick? and i find it dificult to swing my skis round the 180 degrees to get going forwards again. ive only tried it in lose fitting rental boots so now i have my own im hopnig i can master it. any tricks and techniquees would be great.
post #2 of 23
The best way to start learning to ski switch, is to go to a fairly flat beginer slope, and just practice hopping up in the air and doing 180s. It is hardly to learn off the bat, but will make things easier over the long run.

Also, for a lot of people, turning from forwards to backwars, is a lot earier than turning back to forwards.

If you aren't trying to hop up and do a 180, then you are trying to "butter" your skis around. It is fairly easy to do a tip butter, since your boots allready have you leaning forwards a bit. Just put all your wieght on your tips, and pivot around on them.

A tail butter is the same thing, just leaning back.


Theres not much more I can tell you for now. If you just take it slow, you probably aren't going to have any really painful falls, more like you'll just sit down from time to time, so just go out and screw around with it.

Good luck, skiing switch (despite the funny looks you get) is a great way to make boring flat groomers fun again.
post #3 of 23
easiest way skill wise to get to switch is a 180. commit even if you going slow. torque you body to the oppiosite way of your intended rotation. pop into the air has hard as you can(for peopel who know how to do this yes i know we dont do it as hard as we can) while starting to twist your body and turn you head in you desired rotation. when you land you can cheat and spread you tips making a reverse snowplow to slow down. I normally lean into the BACK of my boot and start edging both skis.

Another way is to keep the skis as flat as you can engaging(well letting them slide) your edges on the uphill side adn keep spinning into you tail are now your tips.
post #4 of 23
robbbbbbb,


Here's the trick to learning it. I teach 360 deg whirlys all of the time.
on a gentle slope, glide backwards making a narrow V shape with your skis (reverse wedge). Turn one ski (left one with the tail toward the right) behind you. Half way around, take the right ski and form a narrow A shape (wedge) and continue to to turn it toward your left.
That would give you a counter clockwise 180, backward to forward.

Once you master that, you can narrow down the V and A shapes until you can do it with your skis parallel, by flattining and rotating your skis.
Keep your upper body stable so your legs and feet do the turning.

RW
post #5 of 23
2 words, Flat Skis

other than that, there are a lot of little tricks that you can manipulate the pressure on specific parts of the skis.

A good practice, although you can get dizzy, see how many flat spins you can do without stopping. Then try the other way. Focus on where your head is looking and how that relates to your shoulders.

For me when going from switch to standard, I tend to roll onto my tails a little as I bring my head, shoulders, and hips around while keeping the flattest skis possible.
post #6 of 23
Have your skis on a slight angle, uphill edges into the snow, and allow the edges to release and the skis to slide sideways. Then put more weight or force on the end of the ski you want to be pulled around more by the passing snow and less weight on the edge you want to come forward. It's a skidded move, definitely not an arc move.
post #7 of 23
another good practice for them if you can easily do pivot slips is to "overturn" your pivots, I guess it would be like a pivot slip garland (you will be moving forward and back slightly when you over turn the pivots), but its a good way to build up the confidence in your ability to revert.
post #8 of 23
Geez,

I just change to my snowblades, do a bunch of 360s going both directions, then change bck to my skis. Voila, 360s made easy!
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Geez,

I just change to my snowblades, do a bunch of 360s going both directions, then change bck to my skis. Voila, 360s made easy!
great way to learn
I did some on my regular skis to get back into the swing the first day of the season. One footed skiing too, it helps me get balanced and back into skiing much quicker than anything.

RW
post #10 of 23
One footed 360 spins are hard though. Back at Keystone, during the closing days of the season, we'd all ski together in a gang, and the manager claimed it was possible to do these. So there was about 12 people, in full uniform, solemnly revolving on one leg going down Frenchman, and then they all went down like ninepins. (or 12 pins, I guess).
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
One footed 360 spins are hard though. Back at Keystone, during the closing days of the season, we'd all ski together in a gang, and the manager claimed it was possible to do these. So there was about 12 people, in full uniform, solemnly revolving on one leg going down Frenchman, and then they all went down like ninepins. (or 12 pins, I guess).
these are so possible th trick is to rotate towards the foot you choose. ie right foot rotate clockwise left foot rotate counterclockwise.

I will teach you


since when I started skiing I was always digging my edges to timbuktu its fun to now just play with a flat ski and do some weird stuff. LIke spinning in the middle of a turn. starting the turn with a spin. so many ways to make green runs fun again.
post #12 of 23
I agree with Bush... Fool around with a flat ski on green runs. Get comfortable moving in a traverse and side-slipping at the same time. Train your feet to keep a flat ski, and train your brain to be comfortable moving in a direction other than the one your skis are pointing, and the rest will come quickly and naturally.

I remember the day I finally realized I could ski on a flat ski the whole way down the mountain. I went from being uncomfortable skiing switch to pulling whirleybirds on both greens and blues, playing with the snow and enjoying myself in a way I hadn't in a long time.
post #13 of 23
Can you teach my friend too please... she is a snowboard instructor there but is learning to ski and wants to do the spinning stuff....

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
these are so possible th trick is to rotate towards the foot you choose. ie right foot rotate clockwise left foot rotate counterclockwise.

I will teach you


since when I started skiing I was always digging my edges to timbuktu its fun to now just play with a flat ski and do some weird stuff. LIke spinning in the middle of a turn. starting the turn with a spin. so many ways to make green runs fun again.
post #14 of 23
If you have to ask how to ski "backwards" then you certainly have not mastered going "forward". First things first. Nothing is more lame than seeing someone trying to trick when they can't carve a lick.:
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
If you have to ask how to ski "backwards" then you certainly have not mastered going "forward". First things first. Nothing is more lame than seeing someone trying to trick when they can't carve a lick.:

give the guy a break... everyone has to start somewhere
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
If you have to ask how to ski "backwards" then you certainly have not mastered going "forward". First things first. Nothing is more lame than seeing someone trying to trick when they can't carve a lick.:
I've seen quite a few terrain park rats who can't turn to save their life with their skis on the ground... But they seem to turn just fine when they're in the air.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
If you have to ask how to ski "backwards" then you certainly have not mastered going "forward". First things first. Nothing is more lame than seeing someone trying to trick when they can't carve a lick.:
Actually, the question was not about skiing backwards, but how to complete a switch to forward revert. Give the guy a break, this a common stumbling point even for accomplished skiers if they have never done flat spins.
post #18 of 23
little tiger,

Quote:
Can you teach my friend too please... she is a snowboard instructor there but is learning to ski and wants to do the spinning stuff....
From my post # 4 is how to learn backward to forward.

Quote:
Here's the trick to learning it. I teach 360 deg whirlys all of the time.
on a gentle slope, glide backwards making a narrow V shape with your skis (reverse wedge). Turn one ski (left one with the tail toward the right) behind you. Half way around, take the right ski and form a narrow A shape (wedge) and continue to to turn it toward your left.
That would give you a counter clockwise 180, backward to forward.

Once you master that, you can narrow down the V and A shapes until you can do it with your skis parallel, by flattining and rotating your skis.
Keep your upper body stable so your legs and feet do the turning.
for forward to backward,
Start by skiing forward in a narrow A shape wedge, rotate your right ski's tip torard the left, and as your turn across the fall, start making a V shape with your left ski. This will allow you to turn 180 degrees. From there, follow the quote from above.

Have fun!

RW
post #19 of 23
Robbbbb--Do you ice skate? If not, then it is difficult to analogize for you. If you do, however, the body dynamics can feel exactly the same way. For instance, if you ice skate, imagine doing a hockey stop. It's the same type of hockey stop you would accomplish on skis However, rather than keeping your shoulders constantly perpendicular to the fall line (or skates, if your skating), subtely change two things about your body position:

1) do not edge as aggressively as you would in a hockey stop.

2) allow the momentum of your stop to gradually turn your shoulders

At the end of this, you would have completed what my seven year old calls a "J Turn." You will also be facing up hill. Now, just let gravity take you down the hill, but continue to use the shape of your skis to make slow, gentle turns. To go back forward, reverse the dynamics of the J turn. Slowly wedge, apply pressure to the inside ede of your downhill ski, release weight from your uphill ski, let gravity and momentum slowly swing your shoulders back around. Now you're facing downhill.

Though brusquely put, I do somewhat agree with the post above that suggested you might want to master (or at least feel comfortable with) the rudimentary aspects of downhill skiing so that you don't endanger yourself and those around you by going backwards (because, remember, you can't see behind you).

Good luck.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
easiest way skill wise to get to switch is a 180. commit even if you going slow. torque you body to the oppiosite way of your intended rotation. pop into the air has hard as you can(for peopel who know how to do this yes i know we dont do it as hard as we can) while starting to twist your body and turn you head in you desired rotation. when you land you can cheat and spread you tips making a reverse snowplow to slow down. I normally lean into the BACK of my boot and start edging both skis.

Another way is to keep the skis as flat as you can engaging(well letting them slide) your edges on the uphill side adn keep spinning into you tail are now your tips.
I know this is an old post but for that advice on the 180. that is way way to much rotation. You should really not need any wind up for a 180
post #21 of 23
read the parathese phil I dont do it hard at all kinda of natural for me. but for someone new it will be hard to get a 180
post #22 of 23
I'm going to reiterate what I said before. Start by learning 180s.

Doing the backwards wedge thing, is easier at first, but will creat bad habbits over the long run. A lot of people skiig switch will revert back to that backwards wedge when things get scary. Its far better technique to learn to just carve a tighter turn. If you start with 180s, there is less chance you will have bad habbits later.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Have your skis on a slight angle, uphill edges into the snow, and allow the edges to release and the skis to slide sideways. Then put more weight or force on the end of the ski you want to be pulled around more by the passing snow and less weight on the edge you want to come forward. It's a skidded move, definitely not an arc move.
If I followed this correctly, then this is basically what I do as well. Except that I first twist my upper body in the direction I want to spin to give a bit of momentum, and to see where I will be going next.
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