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Boots too small!

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I've posted a couple of times about the boots i bought, but i figured this title would get more attention...here's the situation:

I bought my size 27cm Dalbellos on Monday. During the Fitting everything went fine, the boots were tight (which is what i thought they were supposed to be) we heated up the liners, I stood in the boots while they cooled and it was great. Now, I've put them on a few times and to be honest it's hurts the oustides of me feet they are that tight. My feet are just a touch on the wide side and that's where most of the pressure is coming from...I thought fitted ski boots were supposed to be comfortable. I am going to call the place tomorrow and see what my options are.

From the looks of my bindings (Look NX11s) it appears that there is a tiny bit of adjustment so could I bump up to a 27.5 or 28cm shell keep my liners i have now and not have to get the bindings moved...do they allow for any adjustment? or shoudl i just hang on to what i have? Will they stretch at all...honestly it hurts to put them on now, but the only place that it is uncomfortable is on the outsides of my left foot, towards the front of my foot.

Also, should I be able to bump up a size without removing the bindings?
post #2 of 29
OK, slow down here. question 1. What are you wearing for socks? Somthting thicker? 2. When your boots are on and you stand up, your toes should go against the of the liner, when you flex into teh tongue, you should feel your toes pull away from the front. Is this the case? Remember too, when your feet are warm, and also late in the day, they swell. In the wintet, when it is cold and early in the day, your feet take up less volume. Any or all of these could be the problem.
post #3 of 29
If you got them fitted locally, take them back. Bootfitting is often an ongoing process. You don't need a longer boot (bigger size), you just need the shells to be widened a bit. They might tell you to wait and see if the liner compresses enough after a few days skiing to make it ok, but if you are sure the shell needs to be wider, they can heat it up and stretch it out.
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Yes! Widening the shell would be the ticket! I didn't know they could do that.Like i said, these are my first pair of my own, i've always been on rentals so i just didn't know. My right boot seems to be perfect, but as of right now I don't feel like I would want to stay in them all day. I will call and ask about getting them widened.

As far as socks, I am wearing Thorlos, they are quite thin and what Stuart at Steep and Deep here in B'ham reccomended...
post #5 of 29
This is the real "fitting" part. I had to bring mine back a few times to have them progressively widen them. The side of my foot from the little toe halfway back to my heel was being squeezed in. They don't want to stretch it too far, because the liner will pack in a bit. If you can't wear them for more than 1/2 an hour without PAIN, you may have to get them stretched a bit before you ski them and some more after a couple of days in them.

I tried the thinest ski socks, but they seemed to fit better bare-foot. They're packing in a bit now. Maybe I should try those thin socks again.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
i'll give them some more time...i knew i could not go any bigger tho...it's just a width issue...how do they widen them? I know for the thermo-fit liners they stuck them on a boot heater and heated the liners, how do they stretch the shells?
post #7 of 29
k2josh,
How long are you leaving the boots on for? I would recommend putting your boots on and stepping into your skis in your living room. Flex forward like you would when skiing and stay in a somewhat flexed position for at least a 1/2 hour. Watch TV or something. Give your feet a chance to adjust to the boot and the liners time to warm up and adjust to your feet. If, after all that they still hurt, then look at getting your shells widened.

I have a pair of Lange 100 Comp. When I first put them on my right foot is always kinda achy. But after about 1/2 my foot and liner adjust and they're great the rest of the day. There is going to be some transition between your running shoe and a ski boot.
post #8 of 29
Is the wideness if the foot created by pronation?
post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
i'll have to look up "pronation"...

would it be smart to heat up my liners again...at the store he only heated them for like 5 minutes and i only stood in them about 10 minutes...can i reheat them at home with something like a hair dryer? then get in em for 30 minutes?
post #10 of 29
The recommended time of heating on most boot liners is 5-10 minutes. You will get a little more width out of heating them up again, as what you're really doing isn't really "heat molding" but speeding up the pack-out process.

The shop you bought them at should do any fitting you need for free. This is a relatively common problem thats pretty simple to fix.
post #11 of 29
Josh, do NOT heat them at home, bring them back to the shop. Pronation is when your ankle rolls inward when you put pressure on it, inturn you foot will widen. If you get your ankle over your foot (ideal), you will get less pressure in the outside part of your foot. That is all layman, there are much better people here than me who can explain this further.
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
i knew i had read "pronation" someplace...i seem to be having that problem lately...noticed one pair of shoes wearing that suggested that...unfortunatley i'm on a really tight budget and the boots i bought to not have canter adjustment...i don't really have any hotspots around my ankles...this weekend i will stand em them for awhile, and if that doesn't work i'll head back to Steep and Deep and see what they can do...hopefully we'll get it worked out...thanks for all the replies...atleast i don't have to worry about swapping out my new boots...
post #13 of 29
Pronation is fixed using footbeds, not cuff alignment (which many boots mistakenly label as canting). You can pick up a pair of trim to fit footbeds at your ski shop for under $40. Ask the bootfitter about them.
post #14 of 29
Josh, pull the liners out of the boots, put the stock insoles from the boots down into the empty shell, then stand in the empty shell on those insoles. Do you feel hard contact (pressure) on the soft/fleshy areas of your foot?

In other words, when standing in both boots do you feel like your feet spread out and splatter against the shell?? If so, then the first thing is to consider support for the foot with at least an aftermarket insole if not a custom. Then, after you are supported, you can consider shell modification if it is still necessary.

SJ
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
the first thing is to consider support for the foot with at least an aftermarket insole if not a custom. Then, after you are supported, you can consider shell modification if it is still necessary.

SJ

also, thorlo socks can be quite thick. try the boots on w/out socks and see if that helps.
post #16 of 29
There are thin ones for skiing, I use them. By no stretch of the imagination could these socks be considered thick.
post #17 of 29
Yeah, I have some very sheer ski hosiery. A sock liner could be even thinner and used alone. I don't think skiing without socks is necessary. Wouldn't that make the boots stink?
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Yeah, I have some very sheer ski hosiery. A sock liner could be even thinner and used alone. I don't think skiing without socks is necessary. Wouldn't that make the boots stink?
Yes, and it makes them a serious PITA to get off and virtually impossible to put back on without drying.

I use sock liners, myself; sometimes I'll switch to "thin" ski socks later in the season if my liners (or my feet) have compacted a bit.
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
these Thorlos are quite thin...i'm just gonna spend more time in the boots, get a couple of good runs in them and see what happens...
post #20 of 29
Whoa!!! Hold on here gentlemen. The most important question has yet to be asked:

Have you skied in these boots? If so how many times and under what conditions? If you have not skied on them and you have only been walking around your living room then all these issues are not important. From my experience (4 boots in the past 7 years or so) all boots need to be skied on a few number of times before the liner somewhat gives or adjusts to the feet. It is only then that I adjust or fine tune the boot. I have had boots that I thought that ridiculously so small that I thought they were made in hell. After about two seasons of skiing I was already wearing double socks because they were too loose.

Ski with them first!!!
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by k2josh View Post

what Stuart at Steep and Deep here in B'ham reccomended...
Did you buy your boots in Alabama?

Take Sierrajim's advice. Do your own shell fit, liner out. Fit the shell for width.

Try the boot without socks to see if that helps. Don't ski without socks. I ski in an ultra-thin sock.

Footbeds will probably be needed.

Go back to the shop and heat the $hit out of the liners. The area where you are having the problem may not be part of the heat fit system. Make sure your heal is seated all the way back. Use toe cups to fill the front of the boot.

Do you trust this guy to blow out the boot? It is done often but it's best if the guy has done it before: . Every boot that I have ever owned required adjustment in the area where you have pain.
post #22 of 29
Do your feet have any lumps or bumps...many feet do, including my left. The right way to deal with these is for the shop to find that spot and either grind away some of the inside of the boot shell or heat and expand (punch out) the shell in that spot. If one foot is just wide, they can grind or punch out the shell over that area. Yes, liners will stretch or pack out over time, but the shell needs to match the shape of your foot first.

You might try phoning that shop, tell them that you have some real problem feet, and ask who is their best person to fit boots to those tough-to-fit feet. Find out when that person works and drop in then for the adjustments. (Sometimes a minor exaggeration is OK....) Do keep coming back until the boots fit like they were made for you. They need to be snug, much snugger than rental boots, and should be the smallest in all dimensions without discomfort. When the boots feel good AND have zero slop between leg movements and ski movements, you're fitted right.

Pronation and footbeds
Alignment and canting

I feel that properly fitted boots, including custom flexible footbeds if needed, provide the most skiing benefit for the money. I've had both rigid and flexible footbeds made by expert bootfitters, and the flexible footbeds are both more comfortable and make the skiing better.


Ken
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
UPDATE: I got in my boots again for awhile tonight (on my skis) stayed in them for about 45 minutes...Right boot is perfect! left boot: still getting a little bit of pain on the outside forward part of my foot. There is no numbness and I can wiggle my toes...i'm thinkin maybe i need to get the left boot reheated again and it will fix my problem...i don't know yet if i'll have to get the shell widened...time will tell, and thanks for all the help!
post #24 of 29
If it doesn't hurt or go numb in 15 minutes, go skiing before you stretch it. If you go skiing for an hour and it starts to hurt or go numb, then stretch it out. Of course it will suck to have to rent boots for the rest of the day, but it would also suck to have your boots stretched out too big for you. Also don't forget that when you are skiing and flexing the heel is in the heel pocket and your foot is a little further back where the boot is a tiny bit wider.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
i think its gonna work out...i just must be used to the "roomy" rentals!
post #26 of 29
Make sure you stop about 2 hours into the first day and check your feet to make sure every thing's o.k.. Frostbite's a bitch.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Frostbite's a bitch.
I don't think you can get frostbite in Alabama.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
If it doesn't hurt or go numb in 15 minutes, go skiing before you stretch it. If you go skiing for an hour and it starts to hurt or go numb, then stretch it out. Of course it will suck to have to rent boots for the rest of the day, but it would also suck to have your boots stretched out too big for you. Also don't forget that when you are skiing and flexing the heel is in the heel pocket and your foot is a little further back where the boot is a tiny bit wider.

I just had orthotics made and neeeded to get new boots as my size dropped with the big adjustment to the my arches.

The boots are Head S12's and feel nice and vaccum tight wihout any bad spots. However, when I wear them for 15 to 20 minutes, my feet start to go numb. The liners are very tight...even when I take them out and wear them alone. The shell size is perfect and should not be an issue.

I have not heat-fitted them yet.

Question: will they expand when I do? Should I do that before skiing in them?
post #29 of 29
The SH3 liner is very thick. It will compress significantly as it is skied in. The heat treatment is a good idea prior to skiing.

SJ
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