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parents race bag

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Recent thread got me thinking about all of the junk that you have to have to support "junior" for race day. I thought I'd start a list of things to carry in your bag or pockets that your are going to need. Just off the top of my head ...

Swix F-4, wipe on in the can or they have small foil packs now.

Other "high speed" fluro $$$ wipe on.

Cat Crap or other anti-fog

Clear goggles .... for change of light

Clean cotton wipes (hankies) and some paper towels + kleenex

Warmers ... I'm partial to boot warmers only cause they have the sticky pad that can go on the top side of the glove without falling out.

Extra gloves or for cold days mittens (they will get wet ... snowfights)

Torx and small screwdriver ..

Snacks ... at least one kind that won't cause dry mouth.

cheepo extra lock



In the roof box extras ..

Poles ...

Helmet ..

Skis with demo binding ... (I had em' so why not + they got used a few times)

Rain gear

Believe it or not, the top three got used more than one time ... if not by your kid, some other kid will. You get to pay back a favor. Saves $$$ buying inflated cheap junk at hill prices on race day.


Add on ...
post #2 of 16
Water

Extra pair of socks (to replace the wet one they dropped in the snow, water, etc...)

Camera for that great shot

Face mask (just in case it gets windy and snowy)
post #3 of 16
I kind of dont want to go there but... Being 19 and still racing locally (as well as FIS) I think one that is catalyst to a good day on the hill from the parents is attitude! Its not a problem at all in FIS but at local races where all the parents are there its... Grotesque sometimes. For the kid its alright to get mad if he scuttles a run or whatnot but parents (Not necessairly his own) can mess the kid up more by passing comments and such. Anyways just though I would throw it out there.

Oh yea when I started to race as soon as I was of a reasonable age my parents (who dont alpine ski to any extent) basically told me that I was on my own "Were gonna be in the timing hut thank you very much" they said but I do think that this list is a great idea.
post #4 of 16
One of each is my rule of thumb. Seriously though, I tend to try to make sure I can cover most contingencies so my day isn't completely ruined. Dry gloves/socks (multiple pairs), balaclavas, fleece pullovers, extra goggles, a few extra bucks, and a towel are at the top of my list for my most-used items.

Zardoz is popular spring overlay for me, and a gummi stone for quick touch ups to the edges. A change of street clothes is nice to have. Goggle wipes and no-fog cloths are good things for wet days.

I usually carry a couple pairs of skis and poles just in case I misread conditions (or the training schedule).

Fig Newtons. Beats granola any day (especially cold days).
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Doesn't hurt to take a quick look at the setting on your kids bindings especially if some of the parents are "win or die" kind of idiots. And, yes, I have seen a kid come flying out in the first turns only to find the bindings of a ski were notched down to "2" ..

Oh yeah ... one of those little plastic scrapers .. a cheepo 2" you can get in the hardware store. Good for clearing ice and frozen crap with no damage .... a pocket comb will work too.
post #6 of 16
-- Ski lock (and actually use it)
-- Swix F4 (in packets) + cloth for cleaning between runs in the spring. Plus a soft nylon brush to brush it out.
-- +1 warmer wax/-1 colder wax in case you got the temp range wrong.
-- Diamond stone/ceramic stone for burrs with edge guide&clamp.
-- Second jacket at the bottom for a warmer ride up to the top or warmer wait if you're lucky enough to have the clothes brought down.
-- Clothes for the after-race tradition of going somewhere for food/candy/ice cream/whatever. (Makes any race a good race.)
-- Extra screws for the slalom guard (better to have a second helmet, but not all of us can afford that..)
-- Inexpensive MP3 player for some psych-up music. [ At least, I think it's music. What should I know. In my day, we sang the words. ] Depending on Junior's age, this may stay with Mom/Dad at the bottom; I don't recommend skiing with them on or riding the lift with headphones.
-- Cell phone. At some races, you can stand 1/2 way down the slope for a better view for the home video, call home, and have loved ones give you the finish time off the web so you know your kid made it to the bottom OK. I wedge my cell phone into my helmet for that "hands free" effect.
-- Insurance card and personal health history. Hopefully, you'll never need it.
-- Ditto on the attitude. See http://eteamz.active.com/sst/handout...cfm?cat=128474
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAS29 View Post
I kind of dont want to go there but... Being 19 and still racing locally (as well as FIS) I think one that is catalyst to a good day on the hill from the parents is attitude!
Good for you for sharing. Yep, lots of parents carry plenty of 'baggage' at the races (and training) that goes way beyond spare socks...

TMAS, what kind of attitude would you like the 'adults' to bring in the bag? Can you be more descriptive/insightful?

Many kids would like the parents to take their "race bag" and.....
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
I know the question was asked of TMAS29, but I'll kick in my two cents anyway!

Attitued and do's & don'ts ... :

A fine line, kind of like walking a tight rope or high wire act. It has to be fun and I've seen things go both ways. Some parents are in "win at all costs mode". Some kids will do well others will wash out of the program.

There is a point where the kid will have to make decisions despite all logic and reason. Sometimes they have to learn by their own mistakes so let nature take it's course. The decision to wear those fancy mirror goggles despite the grey day and flat light when the clear would have been better. Live with it. It makes them feel good.

The decision to (before USSA rules), run their SL's in a GS .... suck it up and let them do it. :

Just remember ... they are with you. They could be out in the parking lot letting the air out of tires.

Get to know the coaches and choose the team carefully. Once you have made a good clear choice .... stand back and let the coaches do their job.
post #9 of 16
Your Right on Yuki... When I think of distruptive parent attitude I think of those people who hound the timeboard and compare the kid's time to every one and then either goes to the kid and tells him in front of everyone that he got his ass kicked by so and so OR that he goes to everyone he knows and talks very loudly (so that everyone hears) that his kid Kicked so and so's arse. I find it can be distruptive to the kid and anyone standing close by. I have had extremely good parents as far as sports are concerned so I dont have any reason to complain myself. But Ive had this perticular person who basically harrassed me "for the good of the team" You would be surprised how much damage a few "well placed" comments can cause! I mean its to be expected in High Level FIS and NorAms but hey I race local races, give my points away and I dont need none of that crap, no one else does either.

Sorry if it lacks sens but its kinda tough to explain...

Little tips from me

At the end of the run, dont look at the time. Ask the kid... Good run or bad run? Then ask him how he felt and what he thought he did good and he did bad.

If someone crashes (after you know he is fine) go tell him that he was absolutely hauling before he whiped.

Dont be mad after the kid if the kid is mad at you. I know it can be tough to take but as a sports parent you need to be able to take being pissed off at from time to time. I know for a fact that as an athlete with a rather explosive temper I would usually direct my anger at my parents (its better than directing it at anyone else) and they were good in the manner that they managed it too.

Dont be a coach, even if you are a younger kid will not want to take advice from their parents (especially after a bad run) this makes me think of the guys in the stands in hockey games that have the stopwatches mesuring the kid's ice time.

I'm sure I can come up with more but most of it is like common sens and the most important thing is talking with the kid as far as what he wants you guys to do... Get him comfortable he will score better!
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAS29 View Post
Dont be mad after the kid if the kid is mad at you. I know it can be tough to take but as a sports parent you need to be able to take being pissed off at from time to time. I know for a fact that as an athlete with a rather explosive temper I would usually direct my anger at my parents (its better than directing it at anyone else) and they were good in the manner that they managed it too.
Orrrrrr,,,,, you (the athlete) can grow up and learn how to deal with the emotional challenges of athletic competition. A good coach will help you with that by administering consistent repercussions for immature behavior (tantrums), like booting your little butt right out of the race,,,, and parents should not encourage the continuance of juvenile behavior by tolerating it. Take away the skis and leave em home till they decide to shape up.

One of the benefits of athletics is that it provides an arena in which youngsters can develop productive life skills and transform into mature adults. Coaches and parents should contribute to that growth process by requiring it.
post #11 of 16
Expressing anger is juvenile behavior? Growing up means not showing emotion?

Thanks TMAS for being honest.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
Orrrrrr,,,,, you (the athlete) can grow up and learn how to deal with the emotional challenges of athletic competition. A good coach will help you with that by administering consistent repercussions for immature behavior (tantrums), like booting your little butt right out of the race,,,, and parents should not encourage the continuance of juvenile behavior by tolerating it. Take away the skis and leave em home till they decide to shape up.
I'm not talking about parents letting their kids throw skis and yell and stuff like that. If I DNF a run I will be angry there is no way around it. I will not yell at anyone and I dont do the pole breaking move. If my dad asks me what the hell happened in an aggresive tone of sorts I will be inclined to "Snap back" a little bit. If anger is juvenile tell that to all the parents who **** a brick when their kids get beat or get DSQd. I think that has much more of a negative consequence than a kid showing displeasure after a not so stellar showing. If I am to eradicate emotions its not worth doing this at all.

Quote:
One of the benefits of athletics is that it provides an arena in which youngsters can develop productive life skills and transform into mature adults. Coaches and parents should contribute to that growth process by requiring it.
Yes sure but not by teaching them not to express emotions, maybe control them but I'm sure you know as much as I do that boxing emotions in can lead to a lack of production in any area weather it be skiing or anything else its better to express yourself. Thats how I feel anyways.
post #13 of 16
Yes, TMAS29, it's not about emotion elimination, it's about emotion control and energy redirection. I work on that with racers all the time. Getting pissed serves little good. Reflect, evaluate, set a course to correct and improve. Get tunnel visioned on success. Don't allow yourself to become discouraged, refuse to be distracted from pursuit of your goals by anything, including non-productive anger and frustration. Immediately transform it into the energy that drives you to relentlessly press on with even greater determination. Be a serious competitor, not a pouty little kid. It's a choice.



And you're right,,, parents demanding results kills a kids desire. I've spent a lot of effort educating and redirecting parents too.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Is there a market here? Could we put this stuff an an "aerosol can" .. ??

Two most important things to have in "the bag" ...

"FocusKontrol" .... spray or rub on for kids comes in 6 oz.

"AngrNot" for parents ... fast acting spray that works on other kids parents too! We recommend the X-Large with the "long distance nozzle".
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Is there a market here? Could we put this stuff an an "aerosol can" .. ??

Two most important things to have in "the bag" ...

"FocusKontrol" .... spray or rub on for kids comes in 6 oz.

"AngrNot" for parents ... fast acting spray that works on other kids parents too! We recommend the X-Large with the "long distance nozzle".

If only we could:
post #16 of 16
Howdy,

My boys race and I must say, I dont really worry about much of anything, thye take care of it. This started taking care of their own stuff at about the J5 2nd year level (Age 10 or so). And that expensive wax? Save your dough. The older one has used it at the J3 JO's. However, for the J4 and under crowd it just isnt gonna matter much. I think it makes us parents feel better.

As a coach though, it is good to have std screwdriver and phillips, leatherman, scraper, maybe some juice, and a big bunch of patience and understanding.

I try and not show too much emotion at races as a parent. Last year I had to get on my kid at the J3 JO's when he fell in the first run of slalom and didnt want to start back in the pack on his second run. I made him because IMO it would be bad sportsmanship not too...

Oh yes, DO NOT show dispointment in your kids time at the finish, that is way uncool. No doubt ski racing is a tuff sport, only one winner, and anything can happen, even with really prepared kids. I think it is important to be able to take it all in stride....
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