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2 Way Sport Radio(s)

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Two-way Sport Radio

-on a Christmas gift list. What are the experiences and preferences of those who have first hand knowledge? This guy skis, hikes, back-packs, bikes, sails, and is talking of taking up rock climbing.

Are there good radios out there, adequate for large ski areas and other mountainous terrain? A brief look on-line brought Motorola at the top of the list; a touch pricey, though of known great quality.

I would assume UHF preferable to VHF; also 4 or 5 watts over 1 or 2, but what is over-kill versus a bit more than adequate?. The whistles and bells of meters probably don’t make them function any better excepting the nice to know battery power indication.

What is deemed good quality for reception and durability for mountainous use?;
brand, model, liked attributes.

Thank You!
post #2 of 12
You're looking for GMRS radios, unless you spend big bucks for professional quality radios. Longer antennas are a bother, but with antennas, longer is better.
http://direct.motorola.com/ENS/phone...e=TWOWAYRADIOS
http://www.motorola.com/governmentan..._803i/id_1387i

Don't expect the truth in the range they list. Please, please get the radios and turn off the function that makes them squawk when the push-to-talk button is released. I find that most annoying as a bystander....


Ken
post #3 of 12
search for Midland radios at buy.com
post #4 of 12
Most of these are line of sight so they are good so long as you stay on the same side of the mountain.

They seem to be real popular and the biggest problem is the number of other people that are on your same channel. The last time I used one I couldn't seem to find a clear channel.

At some mountains (especially the big resorts) a cell phone is a better bet.

I am sure others have some opinions on this issue also.
post #5 of 12
You want VHF radios over UHF. You will cover much more distance with the same power at a low frequency than at a high frequency, especially if there is stuff in the way (read: trees, snow, rain, mountains, etc).

Also, don't get the cheap FRS (family radio system) radios, as there will be hundreds of people fighting over the 15 or so channels at a popular resort. They are UHF and transmit at under 1 watt if I recall correctly.

When I went to Stowe last year with a few friends we brought our amateur radios (which you need to be licensed for), and had no trouble working the lodge from the top of the mountain and vice versa at about 2 watts on the 2 meter band (144mhz, VHF). In contrast, we tried using 440mhz (UHF) and had much more trouble. We could work our hotel from the mountain as well if we used one of the two repeaters on the mountain. Repeaters can be a real plus when working with radio if you are trying to cover long distance at low power, but you won't usually find them outside the amateur bands unless you set it up yourself.

As far as antennas, longer is not always better; it depends on the frequency. You wouldn't want one of those pull-out scanner antennas you see on McGuiver for transmitting on UHF, for example. You want an antenna tuned to the frequency you are transmitting on. Also, most cheap radios won't come with a removeable antenna, so you are probably stuck with the default anyway.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisp View Post
You want VHF radios over UHF. You will cover much more distance with the same power at a low frequency than at a high frequency, especially if there is stuff in the way (read: trees, snow, rain, mountains, etc).

Also, don't get the cheap FRS (family radio system) radios, as there will be hundreds of people fighting over the 15 or so channels at a popular resort. They are UHF and transmit at under 1 watt if I recall correctly.

When I went to Stowe last year with a few friends we brought our amateur radios (which you need to be licensed for), and had no trouble working the lodge from the top of the mountain and vice versa at about 2 watts on the 2 meter band (144mhz, VHF). In contrast, we tried using 440mhz (UHF) and had much more trouble. We could work our hotel from the mountain as well if we used one of the two repeaters on the mountain. Repeaters can be a real plus when working with radio if you are trying to cover long distance at low power, but you won't usually find them outside the amateur bands unless you set it up yourself.

As far as antennas, longer is not always better; it depends on the frequency. You wouldn't want one of those pull-out scanner antennas you see on McGuiver for transmitting on UHF, for example. You want an antenna tuned to the frequency you are transmitting on. Also, most cheap radios won't come with a removeable antenna, so you are probably stuck with the default anyway.

N3EOH here. I was K3TAA but I let in lapse and when i renewed, i had to take a new call. I'm not active at all but might become so if there were a group of skiers out there. My dad is K3PXA and at age 87 is still active on 2 and 10 meters.
post #7 of 12
 hello. Can u help me.i lookig for MIDLAND GXT1000VP4 TWO WAYS RADIOS IN OSTERREICH BUT I CANT FIND. CAN SOME ONE HELP ME WHERE I CAN FIND THESE RADIOS IN AUSTRIA. THANKS
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewschirmer View Post

search for Midland radios at buy.com

I got some Midland 2-way radios at a local sporting goods store - they were rated to 5 miles.
All in all, for cheapies, they are pretty good, but no way no how do they cover 5 miles.
I'd get 'em again, let's put it that way, for skiing, hiking (not too deep), and boating.
post #9 of 12
If you are ready to pay a bit more, then Motorola GP344 is way to go :) We use this in our photo agency for work, and with 5Watt and about 20cm antennas it can easily reach for 10-15km... without direct line of sight. Worse conditions were last year, when I was standing on women SuperG course in Garmisch, and colleague was on men SL course on other side of Garmich (about 10km apart and each course was facing different side of hill). Transmission was perfect, but if you would want even a bit longer reach, there are also around 40cm long antennas. Units have 16 channels, which can be programmed, and on top of that channels are coded so someone else have a bit more problems eardropping on your channel :)
But yes, price is completely different then cheap Radio shack 2way radios. But at least for us, it's worth paying a bit more.
post #10 of 12
I just bought these Midland GXT1050VP4 set and am getting well over 5 miles out of them. I am very impressed with these. They have weather built in too.

www.midlandradio.com/Hunting2.1QY/GXT1050VP4

 

post #11 of 12
I RATHER BUY MOTOROLA GP344, BUT I ALREDY RECIVED FROM EBAY MIDLAND GXT1000 VP4. THESE RADIOS ARE OK, I DID NOT TESTED RANGE. PRODUCER SAY 36 MILE, BUT I KNOW THAH T IS IMPOSIBLE.HOW MUCH IS PRICE FORM MOTOROLA GP344?
post #12 of 12
I got midland gxt1000 from e e bay. My mistake :( i didn't buy Motorola GP344.Midland say they radios GXT1000 have 5w output power? Is that true?
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