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I'd like some advice on instruction

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm new to skiing, having had one beginners lesson last winter at Keystone during a work conference. I showed some good aptitude for it and since I live on the East Bench of Salt Lake City decided to gear up for this year's season. Today I picked up my fitted Daleboots, skis, poles, goggles etc.

I want to start things off this season with another lesson, maybe a second level beginner's course??

I'm closest to the LCC resorts so would prefer to start out at Solitude or Brighton if those are good for lessons. Last year's lesson was a group one - on the company's tab. This year it will be my nickle, are private lessons worth the extra expense for a less-than-wealthy beginner?

Much thanks for any advice to help get me on my way.

mgervais
post #2 of 24
Nomo4me, welcome to EpicSki! And to skiing! What a world has opened up for you!

You might want to take a look at the EpicSki Instructors' Listing to see about hooking up with nearby instructors. BushwackerinPA is in Snowbird (LCC) which shouldn't be too far. I'm not clear whether you're closer to LCC (Snowbird/Alta) or BCC (Brighton/Solitude). There were a few ESA coaches in BCC IIRC, so hopefully some others can jump in with recommendations.
post #3 of 24
BTW, group lessons are a good place to start (IMO). When you get to a point where you want to make a big step up, a private (or a coaching experience) may be a good choice for you. How many days did you ski after the lessons?
post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
BTW, group lessons are a good place to start (IMO). When you get to a point where you want to make a big step up, a private (or a coaching experience) may be a good choice for you. How many days did you ski after the lessons?
I skied (sp?) 6 hours including the lesson. I took the lesson under extreme protest (employer mandated) but was really surprised that I was very comfortable on skis. By mid-day I was comfortable in doing somewhat aggressive carving turns and didn't fall once - or even come close to it.

So I'm excited to pick up again this year and have bought some gear that I won't have to worry about upgrading for quite a while. And I live near the mouth of Parley's Canyon, so Brighton or Solitude would be most convenient but Snowbird is only another 15 minutes away so no big deal to go there.

Thanks for your response.

mgervais
post #5 of 24
I'll personally recommend BushwackerinPA based on his posts here on EpicSki. He'll be easy to contact through the listing I linked you to earlier. There are undoubtedly other great folks in your neck of the woods, too.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
I'll personally recommend BushwackerinPA based on his posts here on EpicSki. He'll be easy to contact through the listing I linked you to earlier. There are undoubtedly other great folks in your neck of the woods, too.
I'll contact him. And thank you for welcoming me aboard here.

mgervais
post #7 of 24
Let's dig a bit deeper into who you are as a skier.

You had one lesson. Did you ski the rest of the day or for a few days after that first?

What were you doing at the end of that lesson or period? Could you easily link turns to the left and right down green terrain?
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Let's dig a bit deeper into who you are as a skier.

You had one lesson. Did you ski the rest of the day or for a few days after that first?

What were you doing at the end of that lesson or period? Could you easily link turns to the left and right down green terrain?
Just 6 hours total.

Yes, I felt really comfortable linking turns on the green runs, which is all we did as a group.

I was also able to carve a big sliding stop from medium speed, repeadedly stopping within arm's length of the instructor.

Not much, I know, but (unlike my golf experience) I have shown an inkling that I can build my skill set to a level that will let me enjoy this sport.

mgervais
post #9 of 24
It sounds like you did quite well. At this point I'd take a private where they can really concentrate on your issues ... there may be a few and easily corrected.

Be sure that you get an instructor with a few miles on his/her clock and that has a good bag of tricks. That takes some time (for the instructor), to develop .... a way to approach each student as an individual.

I'd hate to see you get lumped in with a "herd of turtles" second timers since you hit the mark on exactly where you should have been at the end of the first lesson.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomo4me View Post
I have shown an inkling that I can build my skill set to a level that will let me enjoy this sport.
Easy to learn, difficult to master, may you enjoy the sport everyday, at every level. Welcome.
post #11 of 24
nomo,

Good advice above and welcome to epic and the world of sking. It sounds to me like you may benefit from a private lesson so you can progress at your rate instead of the rate of the group you are placed in. It would also be a good idea for you to get out and ski a little before you take your lesson and start on terrain that seems too easy for at first. You can go to more difficult slopes from there. It takes a little milage to get your "skiers legs" under you in the beginning of the season. You can decide if that would take a few runs or a few hours or days on snow. That should give you the biggest bang for your buck and your time. Good luck!

RW
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies, and another question

I'd be fine to just go ski but honestly my one day of skiing was last March and I don't trust myself on the slope without a bit of instruction to refresh my memory.
It should be money well spent.

Pardon me slipping in an equipment question here:
The skis I bought are the Nordica Hot Rod Nitrous. I know they are going to be a bit lively for me but I figured I could just take it easy on them until gain enough skill to push them.

Is this an accurate perception, or have I made a real problem for myself?

Nomo
post #13 of 24
That's quite a ski you've gotten yourself, Nomo4me! How long did you get them? How much do you weigh and how tall are you?

That is decidedly not a beginner ski! What boots did you get?
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
That's quite a ski you've gotten yourself, Nomo4me! How long did you get them? How much do you weigh and how tall are you?

That is decidedly not a beginner ski! What boots did you get?
Oh God. I hate to be honest in answering these questions, as I don't look like a skier. I don't look like a bike rider either but I do 1500 + miles per year plus plenty of time on our Precor eliptical trainer. My Brothers are both 6' plus and rail thin, so whatever deity was responsible for dispensation of our family genetics is not in my good graces.

Anyhoo..........

I am 5'6" and a very stocky 240 lbs. I went to Daleboot and got fitted for a pair of boots because I have drumstick-like calves (moo) and wide feet. They were able to make a pair of boots for me that I can buckle up at the top of the boot. Last March I had to use the rental boots which I had to leave unbuckled at the top. These Daleboots are da bomb for me!

My skis come to just above my eyes. I haven't a clue as to the size designation.

So what've I done here? I haven't taken the velcro off the skis and could return them, but I'd rather keep them unless broken bones will be the likely result.

Thanks for taking interest!

Mike
post #15 of 24
You're not any more likely to break bones, so don't worry about that.

The Nitrous is a ski for advanced skiers. Your size will actually work in your favor in that length (162cm if I'm not mistaken). It is a more forgiving version of the high-performance all-mountain Hot Rods, but it is still a solid ski. Again, your size will make these a bit more manageable for you, I think.

You are not alone at that size as a skier, and many guys here can relate. I'll let others suggest what they think; it's been a long time since I've helped someone of your early stage with skis like that. I think that you can do it if you want to. It's up to you.
post #16 of 24
I'll jump in here a little. As ssh says, that's quite a ski for a beginner. The problem is not that the ski will cause injuries, it's that most beginners would be making dead-end (that is, not leading to something else) inefficient movements to turn the skis.

As for your size, I'm 6'0" and hover around 250#, I'm an advanced skier and instructor - don't worry about your size. You did the most important thing, you got boots that fit.
post #17 of 24
Mike I emailed you. Only posting because I see your online.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
I'll jump in here a little. As ssh says, that's quite a ski for a beginner. The problem is not that the ski will cause injuries, it's that most beginners would be making dead-end (that is, not leading to something else) inefficient movements to turn the skis.
I would agree... except for his willingness to get coaching. With good coaching, I think he can probably avoid this, don't you? They aren't so demanding that they'll really throw him off, I don't think. They aren't SL Rs...
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
The problem is not that the ski will cause injuries, it's that most beginners would be making dead-end (that is, not leading to something else) inefficient movements to turn the skis.
Well, I guess I'll just have to get on the slope and work my way through this. I'm a bit tapped after dropping all the $$ on gear this week so a private lesson won't happen just yet. And a group lesson ain't the best place to pick an instructor's brain about equipment specific issues.

Barring injury I guess the biggest risk I run is that these skis - being intended for intermediate/advanced skiers - will ingrain some bad habits early on in the learning process by way of over/under compensation for their stiffness.

Thanks for the replies.

Nomo
post #20 of 24
Welcome Nomo. Good advice above.

Don't sweat the skis. Just ski on 'em.

If you take a group lesson again, go mid-week. The groups tend ot be smaller and you'll get more attention. If you take a private, ask for a Certified Pro. Whoever you get, don't be afraid to be specific (and realistic) with your goals.

Best of luck!

Spag
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomo4me View Post
Well, I guess I'll just have to get on the slope and work my way through this. I'm a bit tapped after dropping all the $$ on gear this week so a private lesson won't happen just yet. And a group lesson ain't the best place to pick an instructor's brain about equipment specific issues.

Barring injury I guess the biggest risk I run is that these skis - being intended for intermediate/advanced skiers - will ingrain some bad habits early on in the learning process by way of over/under compensation for their stiffness.

Thanks for the replies.

Nomo
If you hit it off with your instructor, a beer may help you get some specific insights...
post #22 of 24
At your weight you need a "less forgiving" ski to manage the forces you need to put down on the snow. With a couple of good lessons you will be skiing those skis just fine.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
If you hit it off with your instructor, a beer may help you get some specific insights...
Heh, I bought the instructor at Keystone lunch last year. Nice guy. Dabbled in designing and building solar envelope homes and was working on a ski book. I think it was to be called "Moguls are hollow" or something like that.

Nomo
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomo4me View Post
I skied (sp?) 6 hours including the lesson. I took the lesson under extreme protest (employer mandated) but was really surprised that I was very comfortable on skis. By mid-day I was comfortable in doing somewhat aggressive carving turns and didn't fall once - or even come close to it.
The responses here have been very helpful. Based on my experience last March would it be recommended that I take the beginner or intermediate group lesson at Alta?
http://www.alta.com/pages/adult.php

Thx

Nomo
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