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Can anyone ID this board please?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Looking for the following information on this Lib Tech board, please...

Approximate model year, model name, target riderstyle/weight/conditions.

http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=3987052
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=3987051
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=3987050

I e-mailed Lib Tech for this info but have not gotten any response.

Thank you!
post #2 of 14
I don't really know much about it, but Lib Tech makes very good boards. Looks like a Jamie Lynn pro model. Google Jamie Lynn? He was a pro rider back in the day. The board is a little short, so probably best for park/pipe, smaller rider, or beginner. A bigger rider that gets into carving, steeps, powder or big drops might out grow this board. A rider that develops an interest in freestyle will not. I love the kitty curled up in a box. I think Jamie might have done the art.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the quick response - I picked it up at our ski swap this year. The kitty made me do it!! I just got back into riding last year after 10 years of skiing only - I wasn't very good at boarding even then. I'm just hoping the length and flex will be suitable for slow cruising around our midwestern hills and learning how to really carve.
post #4 of 14
I should be great for a developing rider. If you really want to carve, it's easier with hard boots and a carving board. Really good riders can carve on a freestyle board, but it's not really designed specifically for that. I would put Flow bindings on it. I really like step-ins for cruising/carving but I don't know if anyone is making those anymore.
post #5 of 14
It will be quite stiff assuming it's in fact a Jamie Lynn (it looks like it is, the other possibility is that it's just Jamie's art, dunno...) That can be both good and bad, basically you'll likely have to ride a bit faster to get the board to work for you relative to your weight and riding style. If you're getting new boots and /or bindings you might want to err on the stiffer side of softboots to help drive the board. In choosing stance width and angles I'd also be midnful of the board's stiffness in deciding how to ride: basically wide and ducked will make it slightly harder to bend the board. Enjoy the board!
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
I should be great for a developing rider. If you really want to carve, it's easier with hard boots and a carving board. Really good riders can carve on a freestyle board, but it's not really designed specifically for that. I would put Flow bindings on it. I really like step-ins for cruising/carving but I don't know if anyone is making those anymore.
Thanks bunches guys!

I was really happy with my O-Sin SIS boots/bindings last year, but they were on a much shorter board (140). I'm hoping this combo will work to get me back up to speed.....I loaned out my Burton M6 carving board 2 years ago after not riding it for 8 years. Now I'm hoping to get it back this year - I just wasn't comfortable jumping right back on it after such a long hiatus.

Quote:
In choosing stance width and angles I'd also be midnful of the board's stiffness in deciding how to ride: basically wide and ducked will make it slightly harder to bend the board.
I didn't get pics of the whole front of the board, but I've got it set up 1 hole set out from closest stance front and rear, 25deg front, 15deg rear (I think). I'm so used to a ski stance, I have a hard time riding more parallel to the board.
post #7 of 14
Yeah, you'll be rocking it with the SIS! I prefer forward angles too, but consider the width of the board. If your boots aren't slightly overhanging the edges (about 1cm) the board isn't the correct width for you. If you are a little bit flexible with stance angles, make the boots hang over slightly. I forgot to mention this in my earlier replies, but board width is the most important thing (does it put your boots over the edges when you are at your prefered angles/stance width?).
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Yeah, you'll be rocking it with the SIS! I prefer forward angles too, but consider the width of the board. If your boots aren't slightly overhanging the edges (about 1cm) the board isn't the correct width for you. If you are a little bit flexible with stance angles, make the boots hang over slightly. I forgot to mention this in my earlier replies, but board width is the most important thing (does it put your boots over the edges when you are at your prefered angles/stance width?).
If you want to carve, boots overhanging the sides will cause "boot out" and the board will hop as the boots hit the snow and push the edge out of the snow. For carving, look down from the top, and set the farthest outside point just inside of the edge of the board.

My binding angles are something like 64 in front and 58 in back.

Get that M6 back!
post #9 of 14
1cm overhang will not cause boot out unless she has the board tilted up to about 90º edge angle, which probably won't happen for intermediate on freestyle board with step-in bindings. Extremecarver carves with high edge angles on alpine gear and recommends 0.5cm overhang for that syle of riding.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
1cm overhang will not cause boot out unless she has the board tilted up to about 90º edge angle, which probably won't happen for intermediate on freestyle board with step-in bindings. Extremecarver carves with high edge angles on alpine gear and recommends 0.5cm overhang for that syle of riding.
Exactly.

VolklGirl, those are definitely carve-oriented angles, feel free to play with them if you want after riding a bit.
post #11 of 14
You can probably get away with more overhang that 1cm, which will increase your ability to pressure the edge, too much though, and yes, your boots will drag which is bad.

My point was that the extent that you can play around with angles/stance is limited and depends on the size of your boots and board.

If you have small feet and this board is wide you might be better off adjusting to a more sideways stance if necessary to get over the edges, rather than using forward angles with boots too far from the edges.

It was very hard for me to get used to 45º/30º which is what I started on, but I don't think it would have been much different if the angles had been 20º/10º. It's the fact that your feet aren't pointing where you are going that you need to adjust to. Excessive heel side slipping, overturning on the heel edge and underturning on the toe edge are symptoms of riders that aren't used to going a different direction than how their feet and body are facing.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Excessive heel side slipping, overturning on the heel edge and underturning on the toe edge are symptoms of riders that aren't used to going a different direction than how their feet and body are facing.
Funny you should say that.....Last year I had a serious problem with over-rotating on the heel-side. I figured it was from years of 'hips facing directly down the hill' from skiing. I could carve on the toe-side, but my tracks looked a lot more like garlands than 'esses'. A couple riders on here suggested changing my stance to 0deg or duck foot, but then I couldn't skate without catching my foot on the board and landing on my a$$.:
post #13 of 14
I really think this problems will be encountered regardless of the angles. You have to concentrate on making the necessary adjustments. For skating, it's the same problem. You want to point your (front) foot forward, a habit developed through years of walking. I typically will try to over correct, think about leading with my heel (foot pointed slightly backwards) I'm not flexible enough to actually point my foot backwards, but by trying to do that, I manage not to turn the board heelside while trying to skate forward. This focus works for me, but may not be for everybody.

Perhaps it's as simple as pointing your board forward and not your foot, but easier said than done.

It seems to me 0º or duck would make it worse. I think duck stance is more likely to mess up your knees. Also the difference between front and rear binding angle should not exceed 15º.
post #14 of 14
So Volklgirl, could we say:
Once you go Duck, .... you're out of luck.

I've switched to duck stance and have not noticed any difference in the knees while riding. I can't see how it would make any difference when skating because the foot is out of the binding. Personally, I've found that backpedalling with the back foot (free foot) on the heel side of the board pointed backwards and pushing vs on the toe side and pulling keeps the front foot and board aligned properly. Your skatage may vary, but in general, the lower the stance angle you have on the front foot, the easier it is to skate by backpedalling.
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