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Boom!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I just heard my first avalanche bomb of the season.

They must be doing a little bit of preliminary snow control at Teton Village. It didn't snow THAT much up high, maybe 8-10", but there was a lot of wind associated with the storm.

They're doing a lot of on-mountain travel as they try to finish up the new restaurant at the top of the Bridger gondola. I assume they were doing a little bombing for safety.

You gotta love the sound of bombing in the morning.

Oops... there was another one.
post #2 of 13
Do I sense an OH GOODY, in your tone!?
post #3 of 13
Reading the title, I thought this might have to get moved to Food. I figured it was about chili.
post #4 of 13
Booms here too...but they are from thunderstorms.....it is about 60 degrees here...
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

They're doing a lot of on-mountain travel as they try to finish up the new restaurant at the top of the Bridger gondola. I assume they were doing a little bombing for safety.
Judging from the progress I see from the gondola web cam they need to put some boom under the construction crews if they hope to open in January.
post #6 of 13
A question about the avalanche controls...do they light off the dynamite in-bounds or is it only in the back areas that they do this?
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Do I sense an OH GOODY, in your tone!?
Definitely "OH GOODY"!

I'm smilin'.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillA View Post
Judging from the progress I see from the gondola web cam they need to put some boom under the construction crews if they hope to open in January.
As a semi-part-time-sort-of-employee of the JH Mountain Resort, I'd better not comment on that one.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
A question about the avalanche controls...do they light off the dynamite in-bounds or is it only in the back areas that they do this?
Here at JH (and at many other resorts) they do both.

They try to reduce the risk of anything that might avalanche inside the ski area boundaries. In some parts of the mountain, that means explosions on actual inbounds ski terrain. In other places, there are slide paths that are technically outside the boundaries but an avalanche could run all the way to inbounds ski terrain.

Just to clarify, however, they DON'T do snow control work outside the ski area boundary unless the slope they are controlling has the potential to slide INTO the ski area from above. Anything else out of bounds is left alone.
post #10 of 13

anywhere!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
A question about the avalanche controls...do they light off the dynamite in-bounds or is it only in the back areas that they do this?
Avalanche control here in the west is sometimes done with hand charges, sometimes with long range artillery. Obviously, it is done on closed slopes. There is a lot of inbounds terrain that is an avy risk, so those areas will get bombed, too. At some resorts you will see the howitzer or avalauncher emplacements as you ski, but they won't be firing while you are skiing! Much of the control is done early before the lifts open, but sometimes they will bomb closed areas of the mountain while the rest is open.
post #11 of 13
In regards to charge placement...

The Mammoth patroller's site is fascinating in this regards. I stumbled on earlier this year tracing back from a photo on a condo rental site. (Don't remember the exact URL, though I could probably find it again.) I don't know if they want the general public wandering around in there, but there weren't any "closed area" signs...

Anyway, that site has a complete map and photo atlas of the pitches with indications of what kind of charge to use and where to put them (a yellow dot on a photo.) Incidentally, the photos were some of the clearest and most understandable definitions of the various runs that I've ever seen. Makes sense, I suppose -- you want to make sure everyone is talking about the same piece of the mountain.

I'd imagine most mountains have something similar, just not on-line.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
More booms in store for the next few days?

Here's the latest forecast:



THE POWERFUL STORM SYSTEM THAT WILL BRING STRONG WINDS TO THE
AREA...WILL BEGIN TO BRING SNOW TO FAR WESTERN WYOMING MONDAY AND
WILL CONTINUE THROUGH TUESDAY. AT THIS POINT THE FORECAST INDICATES
10 TO 16 INCHES IN PARTS OF THE WESTERN MOUNTAINS...WITH 4 TO 7
INCHES IN THE WESTERN VALLEYS. AS THE DETAILS OF THIS FAST MOVING
STORM SYSTEM BECOME MORE CLEAR...THESE AMOUNTS WILL BE REFINED.
MOUNTAIN TOP WINDS WILL STRENGTHEN TO 40 TO 50 MPH MONDAY
NIGHT...LIMITING SURFACE VISIBILITIES TO NEAR ZERO ESPECIALLY OVER
MOUNTAIN PASSES. STAY TUNED FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT THE
UPCOMING WINTER STORMS.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp View Post
Avalanche control here in the west is sometimes done with hand charges, sometimes with long range artillery. Obviously, it is done on closed slopes. There is a lot of inbounds terrain that is an avy risk, so those areas will get bombed, too. At some resorts you will see the howitzer or avalauncher emplacements as you ski, but they won't be firing while you are skiing! Much of the control is done early before the lifts open, but sometimes they will bomb closed areas of the mountain while the rest is open.
Don't want to argue the fact but the last day I skied at ABasin they were shooting the East Wall chutes, while we were skiing and riding the lifts.

This happens pretty regular that I know of.
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