New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski Injury vs other sports - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
Ditto on the volleyball. I use to play in volleyball in various leagues until I noticed many of the people I played with having back pain. I stopped playing volleyball. I have been skiing every year for the last 25 years. Assuming no collisions with other skiers, I should be able to ski into by 80s.

Show me other sports where people continue to participate for 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60+ years? I can't think of too many. Skiing happens to be one of them.
You're right about the back pain... mine started in my second year of university-level volleyball (03-04). I would be essentially stretching and icing my back during the week's practice time and running on pain killers for games. It doesn't hurt while playing anymore, but I narrowed it down to stress. Once in a while, usually around the Holidays, I'm down for a good half-day with back-pain. So much for being 23... I feel old.
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Alpine skiing is a popular sport with significant risk of injury. Since the 1970s, injury rates have dropped from approximately 5 to 8 per 1000 skier-days to about 2 to 3 per 1000 skier-days. The nature of the injuries has also been transformed over the same period. Lower leg injuries are becoming less common while the incidence of knee sprains and upper extremity injuries is becoming more common. Much of this change can be attributed to advancements in binding technology, which effectively reduces lower leg injury, but does not adequately address the issue of knee sprains. Along with design, binding adjustment and maintenance are important preventative factors. Poorly adjusted bindings have been correlated with increased injury rates. Upper extremity injuries constitute approximately one-third of skiing injuries, with ulnar collateral ligament sprains and shoulder injuries being the most common. Strategies to prevent these include proper poling technique and avoidance of non-detachable ski pole retention devices. Spinal injuries in skiers have been traditionally much less common than in snowboarders, but this disparity is likely to diminish with the recent trend of incorporating snowboarding moves into skiing. Strategies to help reduce these injuries include promoting the development of terrain parks and focussing on proper technique during such moves. Head injuries have been increasing in incidence over recent decades and account for more than half of skiing-related deaths. The issue of ski helmets remains controversial while evidence for their efficacy remains under debate. There is no evidence to demonstrate that traditional ski instruction reduces injury frequency. More specific programmes focussed on injury prevention techniques are effective. The question of pre-season conditioning to prevent injuries needs further research to demonstrate efficacy.

-- University of British Columbia - Sports Medicine Center
It comes down to a risk = reward decision, but it certainly is not a safe adventure, and most of the injuries that I have experienced personally or with friends invariably have been slow moving when you'd least expect to hurt yourself.
post #33 of 50
I used to have knee problems during my racing days. I started stretching every once in a while, not even really all that often, and they went away. Granted, I'm 21, so I'm sure they'll crop up again when I'm older, but I actually ski much harder now than I used to, and my knees feel great.

I'd think the benifits of skiing, and just being active in general far outwiegh any wear and tear on your body.

The healthiest 60 year olds aren't the ones that just took thier vitamins and ate right, but stayed on the couch thier whole life, they are the ones who have been excersizing passionatly thier whole lives.

How old is Klaus Obermeyer? He's been skiing for years and is still more graceful than the average instructor.
post #34 of 50
I love that quote from the Uni of BC... so snowboarders invented getting air and doing tricks? Dang.
post #35 of 50
Most of my friends skied regularly at one time, most of those same friends now avoid it like the plague. The number one reason, fear of injury. One of these friends happens to be a podiatrist, and he told me that knowing what he knows now, skiing is just insane and about as dangerous an activity as one can do; especially if one is relating to knee injuries. But it doesnt stop me from being the perpetually annoying ski emabassador.
post #36 of 50
Directly from my OEC (Outdoor Emergency Care) manual:

Deaths per year by accident type
(average # deaths per year in US)
--------------------------------
Skiing/Snowboarding 34
Lightning 89
Bathtub Falls 300
Auto Collisions 42,000

Breakdown of number of accidents by sport
(per 1000 participants)
------------------------------------------
Skiing/Snowboarding 2
Swimming 2
Tennis 2
Ice Skating 4
Snowmobiling 4
Soccer 13
Bicycle Riding 14
Football 18
Basketball 20
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
I read somewhere that the chance of a frequent skier with advanced skills to blow a knee ligament over any given three year period is about 95%. While that figure might be high, skiing IS very dangerous. I believe your doctor was correct to suggest that skiing is far more dangerous (for serious injury, not fatality) than any other recreational activity. I wouldn't blame new equipment, skiers have always experienced frequent injury. A majority of world cup racers have had knee reconstruction. NFL players don't require surgery anywhere near as often as ski racers.
Well, considering the terribly short life expectancy of NFL players*, I'll take the kneee problems!

btw 95% sounds unrealistically high

*I forget why this is...anyone?
post #38 of 50
Steroids? Obesity?

Yeah, that 95% is wierd, I have no idea where that figure came from.
post #39 of 50
Even though the football question wasn't a direct topic of the thread, it kinda ties in with other "high impact" sports. Am not quite sure a reputable source for the average life span of an NFL player (all depends on how long and what position...obviously the backup QB who only holds on kicks won't get beat up as much as a middle linebacker) but a couple folks have looked at, and are continuing to look at, sleep apnea and heart conditions. A lot can be said for quality of life too. Think of the big linemen with huge knecks...well as we're all too failiar with skiing gravity will win and whatever is on top of the airway (ie muscle, fat, excess skin) will evetually compress it during sleep (if I recall correctly, apnea is technically like 20 sec. without breathing during sleep) which is not a fun way to get a good nights sleep. People may awake many times during the night gasping for air. From the mortality aspect, many football players have a high Body Mass Index (linemen especially), even though they're in excellent shape. A paper out of the New England Journal of Medicine (and I believe UNC looked at something similar in college football) noted an average BMI for pro football players to be 31.5 with lineman averaging 36.6 (note that a BMI greater than 30 is a threshold for obesity). It's this high BMI that puts strain on the heart, which evetually goes into failure and hence death. As a side note this heart failure, however, is different than the kind causing sudden death in young athletes who are in the middle of activity. SO to have digressed a bit in addressing an above mentioned question. More on whether new equipment is causing increases in injuries at a later time.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by eblackwelder View Post
Directly from my OEC (Outdoor Emergency Care) manual:

Deaths per year by accident type
(average # deaths per year in US)
--------------------------------
Skiing/Snowboarding 34
Lightning 89
Bathtub Falls 300
Auto Collisions 42,000

Breakdown of number of accidents by sport
(per 1000 participants)
------------------------------------------
Skiing/Snowboarding 2
Swimming 2
Tennis 2
Ice Skating 4
Snowmobiling 4
Soccer 13
Bicycle Riding 14
Football 18
Basketball 20
But you must also take into account what the percentage is of the population that practices the above activities, then you might see that percentage wise, skiing is quite dangerous.
post #41 of 50
So if skiing is sooooooo friggin dangerous, how come each season less than two or three skiers I know get injured, and NOONE I have personally known has ever gotten an injury that has really changed thier life at all in the long term?

Statistics can lie. All this just seems like fearmongering doctors saying the sky is going to fall. Give me a freaking break. Stats are such bs for this sport especially, because you can go huck cliffs to hardpack, or just ski the green runs.

Even if you do choose to continually push yourself and try and do bigger and better things, if you are careful, and only do things in the right conditions, your chances of signifigant injury are miniscule, especially if you make sure to stay flexible and strong.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
But you must also take into account what the percentage is of the population that practices the above activities, then you might see that percentage wise, skiing is quite dangerous.
By definition, population is not a factor. By rating the risk per capita, only percentage is relevent.

Therefore, regardless of how many or few people participate in each sport, rate of injury is on the only factor. It's the only way to create a meaningful comparison.

2 per thousand is 2 per thousand, whether you're skiing, swimming or playing tennis.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
By definition, population is not a factor. By rating the risk per capita, only percentage is relevent.

Therefore, regardless of how many or few people participate in each sport, rate of injury is on the only factor. It's the only way to create a meaningful comparison.

2 per thousand is 2 per thousand, whether you're skiing, swimming or playing tennis.
Yup, what he said.
post #44 of 50
XjGuy was talking about % with the top half of the stats.

If the whole population drives cars and the are 42,000 deaths/year

and only 1% of the population skis, then you have to times the stated death rate by 100 to get a reference to the 42,000/year occuring from auto collisions.

Using 10% as in this example would be 100 x 34 = 3400. It is still way less than auto deaths per year. Hence less dangerous
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by course9x View Post
XjGuy was talking about % with the top half of the stats.

If the whole population drives cars and the are 42,000 deaths/year

and only 1% of the population skis, then you have to times the stated death rate by 100 to get a reference to the 42,000/year occuring from auto collisions.

Using 10% as in this example would be 100 x 34 = 3400. It is still way less than auto deaths per year. Hence less dangerous
Oh, um, duh. Hey, we're all right! Let's go skiing to celebrate and test out those numbers/statistics!
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by course9x View Post
XjGuy was talking about % with the top half of the stats.

If the whole population drives cars and the are 42,000 deaths/year

and only 1% of the population skis, then you have to times the stated death rate by 100 to get a reference to the 42,000/year occuring from auto collisions.

Using 10% as in this example would be 100 x 34 = 3400. It is still way less than auto deaths per year. Hence less dangerous
Give that man a cigar!
post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
So if skiing is sooooooo friggin dangerous, how come each season less than two or three skiers I know get injured, and NOONE I have personally known has ever gotten an injury that has really changed thier life at all in the long term?

Statistics can lie. All this just seems like fearmongering doctors saying the sky is going to fall. Give me a freaking break. Stats are such bs for this sport especially, because you can go huck cliffs to hardpack, or just ski the green runs.

Even if you do choose to continually push yourself and try and do bigger and better things, if you are careful, and only do things in the right conditions, your chances of signifigant injury are miniscule, especially if you make sure to stay flexible and strong.
I am all up for skiing, as you might guess, but I personally know 3 people whos lives have been negatively impacted as a result of skiing. Extensive multiple injuries...needless to say they no longer take part in celebrating the glory that is white gold and throwing one self down a perfectly good mountain on two slick sticks.
post #48 of 50

Two quick comments

Andy VW, you didn't go into detail, so this may be completely redundant to say, but I have a friend who was a Big 10 middle blocker. In addition to her banged up knees, she also had a stress fracture of one of her vertebrae. If you haven't had a doctor check for that specifically, you may want to.

About NFL and skiing, the 'rule of thumb' numbers I remember seeing are that injury rates in the NFL and on the World Cup tour are roughly the same, at around 125 % / year. Yes, over 100 - some people have multiple injuries in the same year, and it averages out to more than one per participant per year.

But that's the NFL, and the World Cup racers, not normal earthlings. I'll try to remember not to participate in either of those activities, and I don't for a second believe the 95% knee injury for recreational skiing.
post #49 of 50

Risk and Temperament

In a sport where you're sliding downhill on a slick surface, in the presence of trees, cliffs and other sliding beings, there's always a reasonable chance of injury.

BUT,risk is substantially a function of free will - or, testosterone.

Females can be injured as easily as men (especially with regard to ACL's - 6 times more likely on a woman). But, I'll wager their injury and death rates on the hill - per capita - are nowhere near that of men.

Why? Because they're less likely to tempt fate.

The same is true of older males. We 50'ish males break more easily than 20'ish males. But, we're less risk-prone, so we end-up in fewer meat-wagons.

I almost killed myself on skis at age 21. I can still get killed today. But, it's less likely, because I'm not the Kamikaze I once was.

Temperament has a lot to do with risk.
post #50 of 50

acl

lets take the acl as an example. did anyone ever hear of an acl injury 30 years ago.? i didnt. now you meet folks everyday who tore it. is that because it happens more? or is it because there were no mri's and no way to fix it back then? or is it higher forces with shaped skis?
also, is there any reason to use pole straps? that would avoid almost all thumb injuries.
as far as being hit from behind, how about a "deaf skier" sign on your back? would that help?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: